Spicy Pepper & Patchouli Palm Free Cold Process Soap Recipe

This palm free cold process soap recipe is scented with spicy pepper and patchouli, clove and cinnamon essential oils. Learn how to make this homemade soap using the cold process soapmaking method.

This palm free cold process soap recipe is scented with a pepper fragrance oil that’s been blended with patchouli, clove and cinnamon essential oils. The spicy fragrance blend of this palm free cold process soap recipe makes it suitable for either sex due to it’s unisex scent. However, as both pepper fragrance oils and pepper essential oil do accelerate trace and can quickly cause cold process soap to seize, this palm free cold process soap recipe is recommended for soapmakers with some experience under their belt. If you’re new to soapmaking but still want to give this homemade palm free cold process soap recipe a try, simply omit the pepper fragrance oil from the recipe.

In addition to the other ingredients in this palm free cold process soap recipe, I also included calendula flower powder. Calendula flowers are traditionally used in skin care products to help support healthy skin and assist with minor wounds. It is a common ingredient in many herbal oils, salves and lip balm recipes. Alternately you can also infuse the olive oil in this palm free cold process soap recipe with whole calendula flowers prior to creating this homemade soap.

This palm free cold process soap recipe is scented with a pepper fragrance oil that's also blended with patchouli, clove and cinnamon essential oils. The spicy fragrance blend of this palm free cold process soap recipe makes it suitable for either sex due to it's unisex scent.

Spicy Pepper & Patchouli Palm Free Cold Process Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7.2 oz. lard (pig tallow)
11.52 oz. pomace olive oil
5.4 oz. rice bran oil
7.2 oz. 76° melt point (refined) coconut oil
1.8 oz. castor oil
2.88 oz. sunflower oil

11.8 fluid oz. distilled water
4.8 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

.5 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)
1 oz. patchouli essential oil
.3 oz. Madagascar pepper fragrance oil (or .15 oz. black pepper essential oil)
.15 oz. cinnamon leaf essential oil
.05 oz. clove bud essential oil
.5 oz. calendula flower powder
whole black peppercorns, to suit (optional)

Soap Notes:

Water as % of oils = 33%
8% superfat

This palm free cold process soap recipe yields 10-12 bars of soap that will weigh around 4 oz. each depending on how they are cut and fits inside my DIY wooden loaf soap mold.

If you do not want to use tallow, palm oil is the closet alternative. You won’t need to recalculate the lye for this substitution unless you are changing the batch size or superfat for this palm free cold process soap recipe. However, by using palm, this homemade soap recipe will obviously no longer be palm free. Rice bran oil can easily be substituted with olive oil or grape seed oil and sunflower oil with safflower oil. However you will want to run the numbers back through a lye calculator just to be safe.

If you like this palm free cold process soap recipe but prefer a different scent, simply substitute the fragrance oil and essential oils with up to 2-2.25 oz. of your fragrance oil of choice. (Or up to 1 oz. per pound of oils.) To substitute essential oils for this homemade soap recipe use 1-3% of the total oil weight in your choice of essential oil(s). However, defer to manufacturer’s usage recommendations if they vary from typical rates of usage.

Instructions:

To create this spicy pepper & patchouli palm free cold process soap recipe, you’ll need to follow your basic cold process soapmaking method instructions. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, using a digital scale weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the lard along with the olive, rice bran, coconut, castor and sunflower oils using a digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until all the ingredients have melted, then remove from heat. Prepare your fragrance and essential oils by weighing them out into a glass Pyrex measuring cup and set aside. Do the same with the sodium lactate and calendula flower powder.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to around 85°-90°F you’re ready to make soap.

Add the sodium lactate to the cooled lye-water and stir.

Add the calendula flower powder to the soapmaking oils and mix with a stick blender until evenly distributed.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach a very light trace. Add the fragrance and essential oils and continue mixing either with the stick blender on the lowest setting or by hand. The soap will will thicken very quickly. It will also very likely seize. Don’t panic. Simply pour or spoon the soap into your prepared mold. If it solidifies on you simply put on gloves and press the soap into the mold. As it begins to gel – this also happens very quickly – it will mush into place for you. Push the soap evenly down into the mold.

If desired add whole black peppercorns to the top of the soap and gently press into the top of the soap using gloved hands.

Leave the soap uncovered and set aside for 24 hours.

After 24 hours your can unmold your homemade soap loaf and cut it into bars. Allow bars to cure 4-6 weeks before use, then wrap and label as desired.

For more of my homemade soap recipes as well as bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also follow me on Pinterest for collections of not only my homemade soap recipes and beauty DIY’s but also some of my favorites from around the web. Or, for more palm free cold process soap recipes go here.

Keep track of all my new homemade soap recipes and other DIY creations by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Traditional Castile Soap Recipe

This traditional Castile soap recipe is made using 100% olive oil and is scented with natural basil, lemongrass and rosemary essential oils.

This traditional Castile soap recipe is scented for spring with natural basil, lemongrass and rosemary essential oils. Unlike my Castile soap recipe with bee pollen powder I shared recently, this traditional Castile soap recipe is made using 100% olive oil. However, as 100% olive oil soaps tend to be a softer soap that takes months to harden, I added a small amount of sodium lactate to this traditional Castile soap recipe. I also used a steeper water discount than normal. This allows you to unmold this Castile soap after a day and cut it into bars within 24-48 hours. You can, however, omit the sodium lactate. Just keep in mind it may take a bit longer to harden up.

This traditional Castile soap recipe is made using 100% olive oil and is scented with natural basil, lemongrass and rosemary essential oils.

Traditional Castile Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

36 oz. pomace olive oil

4.5 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide
11 fluid oz. distilled water

.5 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)
.35 oz. basil essential oil
.35 oz. rosemary essential oil
.35 oz. lemongrass essential oil

Soap Notes:

water as % of oils = 30.5%
6% superfat
+/- .5 oz. essential oil per pound of oils

This cold process Castile soap recipe yields 10-12 bars of soap that will weigh around 4 oz. each depending on how they are cut and fits inside my DIY wooden loaf soap mold.

Instructions:

You’ll need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking instructions for this traditional Castile soap recipe. You can substitute virgin olive oil for the pomace olive, however keep in mind it’s likely to take longer to reach trace.

(If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s another good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, using a digital scale weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the olive oil using a digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat to about 90°-95°F then remove from heat. Prepare you essential oils by weighing them out into a glass Pyrex measuring cup and set aside.

When the lye-water has cooled to around 90°-95°F – you want the olive oil and lye-water to be about the same temperature – you’re ready to make soap.

Weigh out the sodium lactate and stir into the cooled lye-water. Now slowly pour the lye-water into the olive oil. Mix with a stick blender until you reach a light trace. Add the essential oils and combine with the stick blender until you reach a full trace.

Pour the soap into your prepared mold.

Level the top of the poured soap with needed. Leave uncovered so the soap doesn’t overheat. Set aside for 24 hours.

After 24 hours your can unmold your Castile soap loaf. If it’s hard enough, cut it into bars when you unmold it. If it’s still a bit soft, wait an additional day then cut into bars. Allow bars to cure anywhere from 4 weeks to 6 months before use. The longer the cure the better the bar. Typically soaps created using a traditional Castile soap recipe are cured for 4 to 6 months for best results.

This traditional Castile soap recipe is made using 100% olive oil and is scented with natural basil, lemongrass and rosemary essential oils.

Once your Castile soaps have cured, wrap and label as desired. I added butterfly stickers to mine that I found here and simply printed onto blank sticker paper.

For more of my homemade soap recipes as well as bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also follow me on Pinterest for collections of not only my homemade soap recipes and beauty DIY’s but also some of my favorites from around the web.

Keep track of all my new homemade soap recipes and other DIY creations by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.




Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

DIY Natural Fresh Breath Gel for Dogs

This DIY natural fresh breath gel for dogs really works at freshening breath and helping to prevent tarter on dog's teeth. Plus it's completely natural!

Does your dog’s breath kill trees from a hundred paces? Then perhaps consider this DIY natural fresh breath gel for dogs.

Let me begin by stating I have a miniature dachshund. His name is Jasper. And like most dachshunds he has some of the worst breath ever. No, seriously. Ever. That said I’ve tried all kinds of things to freshen his breathe including all those silly tooth brushing bones and minty dog treats. And while they might help keep tarter and plaque at bay, they seem to do absolutely nothing for the state of his breath.

Over Christmas my brother told me about a tarter control and fresh breath gel for dogs that he had been using. Not only did it work great on his dogs, but it also had neem oil as one of the ingredients. As neem oil was one of my favorite discoveries of the past year I decided I had to try this out. But instead of buying a gel tarter control and breath freshener I decided to try making something similar with ingredients I already have in my stash of soapmaking ingredients.

I looked at two popular products when trying to decide which natural ingredients to use. Tropiclean Fresh Breath Plaque Remover Pet Clean Teeth Gel is one such popular product. It’s made with Purified Water, Natural Derived Alcohol, Natural Mint, Glycerin, Natural Cleanser, Carbopol, Chlorophyllin, and Green Tea Leaf Extract. The other is Nutri-Vet’s Tartar-Defense Spray for Dogs which is made with Water, Grain Alcohol, Peppermint Oil, Grapefruit Seed Extract, Rosemary Oil, Thyme Oil, and Neem Oil.

This DIY natural fresh breath gel for dogs really works at freshening breath and helping to prevent tarter on dog's teeth. Plus it's completely natural!

For my DIY fresh breath gel for dogs I sort of combined select ingredients from both of these products. I was leery about using grain alcohol – aka moonshine – and water in my recipe as this was basically an “edible” product and I wasn’t entirely sure what to use an emulsifier to keep the oil and glycerin mixed with the alcohol without using propylene glycol. (I also wasn’t entirely sure about rubbing alcohol on my dog’s teeth.) So instead I simply used natural vegetable glycerin as the main base. This still encourages dogs to lick their teeth like the commercial brands to help prevent tarter. But as my main concern was fresh breath and getting my dog not to run and hide when I went to rub it on his teeth, I chose to use glycerin which makes for a sweet alcohol free base that can be easily administered.

I also used neem oil for it’s awesome anti-bacterial properties and essential oils for their anti-bacterial and breath freshening properties. Additionally my DIY fresh breath gel for dogs also incorporates liquid grapefruit seed extract for its anti-oxidant properties – an ingredient that Nutri-Vet states on their product helps to reduce inflammation – and grape seed oil. There are a few easy substitutions you can make, however, if you don’t have a product on hand or for specific properties you’re after. For example, you could easily sub the grape seed oil – an edible oil which I chose for the pleasant flavor – with coconut oil which is used in the oil pulling method to remineralize and strengthen teeth. (I used refined coconut oil as it has a lower melt point than unrefined coconut oil.) You could also easily play around with the essential oils to see which ones work best for your dog’s breath and/or his taste buds.

This DIY natural fresh breath gel for dogs really works at freshening breath and helping to prevent tarter on dog's teeth. Plus it's completely natural!

Fresh Breath Gel for Dogs Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

.8 oz. organic vegetable glycerin
.1 oz. liquid grapefruit seed extract
.1 oz. grape seed oil (or refined coconut oil, melted)
6 drops 100% pure neem oil
6 drops rosemary essential oil
6 drops spearmint (or peppermint) essential oil

Instructions:

If you don’t have grapefruit seed extract you can substitute it with more of the grape seed oil or with refined coconut oil. You can also try using 4 drops rosemary eo, 4 drops peppermint eo and 2 drops thyme eo in lieu of 6 drops each of the rosemary and spearmint essential oils.

Using a digital kitchen scale weigh out the glycerin, grapefruit seed extract and grape seed oil into a small glass jar or bowl. Use a plastic transfer pipette or glass dropper to add the drops of neem oil and essential oils. (If your neem oil has solidified due to cold temperatures simply place the bottle into a bowl of hot water until it liquifies.) Mix with a utensil to combine.

Now use a funnel to combine in a 1 oz. amber glass bottle with a dropper. Shake well once more for final measure.

To use add a few drops of this fresh breath gel for dogs to your finger or a toothbrush and rub onto your dogs teeth.

Click here for more recipes that use neem oil including homemade soaps, salves and creams. Or, for more home remedies and DIY ideas like this one be sure to follow my boards on Pinterest. You can also keep up with all of my new posts and recipes by following on Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr as well as on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and G+.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.