Turmeric Ginger Apple Cider Vinegar Tonic Recipes

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



My turmeric ginger apple cider vinegar recipes treat the body to natural probiotics and can help to fight chronic inflammation. Both turmeric and ginger are known for their natural anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, turmeric contains curcumin, which is believed to have anticancer properties.

My turmeric ginger apple cider vinegar recipes provide your body with natural probiotics and contain both turmeric and ginger which can help to fight chronic inflammation.

Both turmeric and ginger are well known for their natural anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, turmeric, a powerful antioxidant, contains curcumin which is believed to have anticancer properties. There have been over 2000 studies and a phase 1 cancer trial in the UK that have shown curcumin can help to prevent several forms of cancer including breast, lung, stomach, liver, and colon cancer. As there is a history of breast cancer in my family, turmeric has become a part of my daily diet.

Since drinking my turmeric ginger apple cider vinegar tonic daily in conjunction with switching to an aluminum free natural deodorant – this is the deodorant I make and use – my symptoms from fibromyalgia have diminished quite significantly. Most days I feel 99% better than when I was first diagnosed.

My Backstory.

Originally, I began drinking kombucha on the advice of an acquaintance who indicated it might help with my fibro symptoms. And it did. But I later switched to drinking apple cider vinegar instead.

Apple cider vinegar had fewer calories and less sugar than kombucha which worked better with my body’s needs. My drink of choice was Kevita’s Turmeric Ginger Cleansing Probiotic Apple Cider Vinegar Tonic. However, drinking this everyday cost around $100 a month. Obviously, not willing to give up how much better I’ve felt since adding this turmeric ginger apple cider vinegar drink to my diet, I finally decided to make my own.

Following are two great turmeric ginger apple cider vinegar recipes for you to try out!

My turmeric ginger apple cider vinegar recipes treat the body to natural probiotics and can help to fight chronic inflammation. Both turmeric and ginger are known for their natural anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, turmeric contains curcumin, which is believed to have anticancer properties.

Turmeric Ginger Apple Cider Vinegar Tonic Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

8 fluid oz. natural 100% apple juice
12 fluid oz. filtered water
3 Tablespoons Bragg’s Organic Apple Cider Vinegar
1 Tablespoon organic unsulphured blackstrap molasses
1 teaspoon ginger root powder
1/2 teaspoon turmeric root powder

Instructions:

You’ll want to use Bragg’s Organic Apple Cider Vinegar as it contains the mother and all the good probiotics for your gut. Store it at room temperature and shake before using. You do NOT want to heat your apple cider vinegar as it will kill all the good “bugs.”

Begin my mixing the apple cider vinegar with the blackstrap molasses. Otherwise when you add your molasses it will all sink to the bottom.

I love the flavor the molasses adds to this recipe. You can substitute the molasses with local raw honey or even manuka honey if you like for a milder taste. I prefer the molasses not only for the taste, but also because it contains vitamin B6. After having shingles I can tell you that vitamin B6 can help to deter getting shingles as well as the recurrence of shingles. My patient information sheet from the doctor even instructed me to take 50mg of vitamin B6 twice a day for two months.

Once you’ve mixed the apple cider vinegar and molasses together, measure out the other ingredients and mix in a glass jar or container. (I use an ello Elsie 20 oz. BPA Free Classic Milk Jar that I bought from Target to mix mine.) If you have access to fresh ginger, you can use a microplane grater to grate fresh ginger instead of using powdered.

Feel free to use more turmeric and/or ginger as desired to suit your taste. Or to also make other variations of this recipe such as using tea instead of apple juice. You can also try adding a dash of cinnamon!

If you aren’t drinking your turmeric ginger apple cider vinegar tonic right away, be sure to keep it stored in the fridge until use!

Blueberry Turmeric Apple Cider Vinegar Tonic Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

8 fluid oz. natural blueberry juice
12 fluid oz. filtered water
3 Tablespoons Bragg’s Organic Apple Cider Vinegar
1 Tablespoon raw local honey or manuka honey
1 teaspoon ginger root powder
1/2 teaspoon turmeric root powder

Instructions:

Like my previous recipe, you’ll need to mix the apple cider vinegar with the honey to dilute the honey. Then combine all of the ingredients in a glass container and shake well to combine.

I hope you enjoy these turmeric ginger apple cider vinegar recipes! If you have a favorite apple cider vinegar drink recipe I’d love for you to share it in the comments below. Or simply tell me what your favorite flavor combinations are!

For similar health and wellness recipes, be sure to follow my Natural Home Remedies and Herbal Health Care board on Pinterest here.

Also don’t forget to find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. You can sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Geode Soap Tutorial for Valentine’s Day Gifts or Just Because

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Geode soap is a lot easier to make than you might think. Despite the number of steps involved in making geode soap, there’s no real right or wrong way to do it. It’s more about your own creativity. So think of my soap geode tutorial as an art class – one where you’re given free reign to make and create whatever your heart desires.

Learn how to make your own crystal geode soap eggs with hearts for stunning DIY Valentine's Day gifts!

And, because Valentine’s Day is right around the corner, I’ll also tell you how to fill the centers of your geode soaps with hearts to gift for Valentine’s Day!

As my geode soap tutorial is more of a guide rather than a geode soap recipe, I’m simply giving you step by step instructions with photographs rather than my usual soap recipe format. It should make following my geode soap tutorial easier than working out a recipe since there are so many different parts.

Geode Soap Tutorial

I recommend starting with a 2 lb. block of clear melt and pour soap base. If you want to scent your soap with a fragrance oil or an essential oil, I recommend cutting your soap into chunks, melting, and then adding the fragrance before you get started. Once you’re ready to begin you would then start with a solid scented soap block.

Begin by weighing out 4 oz. of clear melt and pour soap base. Cut into small chunks and shards of varying sizes.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Now sprinkle about four pinches of skin safe glitter onto your soap chunks. I evenly mixed Nurture Soap’s Twinkling Lights skin safe glitter and Intergalactic skin safe glitter onto mine.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Roll up a small piece of foil into a ball and set it inside the center of the soap shards.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Now weigh out 2 oz. of clear melt and pour soap base. Heat 15-30 seconds in the microwave, just until melted. Once it’s cool enough to handle, drizzle a small amount onto your soap chunks. Begin working the soap chunks into a ball around the foil ball.

Be patient. The chunks won’t want to stick together at first. Keep working the pieces together and pouring the melted soap onto the chunks. As the melted soap cools the soap chunks will start holding together. Once you’ve formed a solid ball that stays together, you’re ready for the next step.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Weigh out 2 oz. more of your clear melt and pour soap base and cut into chunks as you did when you first started. Then weigh out 2 oz. of clear melt and pour soap base and melt in the microwave. Add a colored mica powder of your choice to desired color and mix to combine. I use Nurture Soap’s Red Vibrance mica powder for this step.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Use the colored melted soap to adhere the new soap chunks around the ball of soap you formed previously.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Now dust the top of the soap ball with your sparkly white glitter. In this instance, I used more of the Twinkling lights glitter.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

On top of this add a complimentary colored mica powder to the one you used previously to tint your soap. In this case I used Nurture Soap’s Candy Apple Red mica powder.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Weigh out 2 oz. of clear melt and pour soap base into a large container. I used an 8 Cup Pyrex measuring cup but you could also use a large glass bowl. Cut into chunks and melt. Add a soap colorant or mica powder of choice until desired color is achieved. I used a sliver from a Crimson soap color bar. Stir until the color is well mixed.

Now dip the geode soap ball into the colored soap until it’s coated with about half of the soap – or an ounce of the melted soap – in your container.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Set the soap ball aside on a wire cooling rack to solidify further.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Now sprinkle your soap ball with black skin grade glitter.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Dip your soap ball back into the remaining melted soap. Coat the soap ball with more soap.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Allow your soap geode to solidify again by placing it back on the wire cooling rack.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Mix black skin safe glitter to suit into the remaining melted soap.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Sprinkle more black glitter onto the soap ball.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Now cover the soap geode with the remaining soap in the bowl. This is the messiest part.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Keep spooning the melted soap over the soap geode you are forming until you’ve used all of the soap left in your bowl. As the soap cools it will become gummy. As it does this, you can slowly start to smooth the outside of the ball with your hands.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Place your crystal geode soap egg onto your wire cooling rack to finish hardening. You can smooth out any rough edges while the soap is in this stage.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Once the soap has cooled and hardened, use a hot knife – you can just run it under hot water – to carefully cut your soap geode in half. Work around the foil in the center using the knife to cut around the diameter of your soap geode.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Carefully remove the foil from the center of your soap geode.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

And voila! You’ve now completed your very first soap geode!

Learn how to make your own crystal geode soap eggs with hearts for stunning DIY Valentine's Day gifts!

To create a heart in the center of your soap geode you can do several things. You can either use a knife to cut out a heart shape in the center of each side of your soap geode and fill with red colored clear melt and pour soap; you can place a heart embed from a small heart shaped mold into the center of your soap geodes and pour clear melt and pour soap around them; or you use a small heart cookie or knife to create a heart embed for the center of your soap geodes from a thin layer of red dyed soap.

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

Don’t forget to take your homemade soap geodes out in the sun to see how cool they look!

Try your hand at this geode soap tutorial and learn how to make homemade soaps that look like geode crystal rocks!

You can even see the sun shine through them!

Have you made your own soap geodes yet? If so be sure to share the geode soaps you’ve create on my facebook page!

Don’t have time to make your own? You can find both inspiration for making your own soap geodes as well as handmade soap geodes you can buy on Etsy here.

For more DIY Valentine’s Day gifts you can make and gift, be sure to follow my DIY Valentine’s Day Gifts board on Pinterest. Or follow my Simply Soapmaking and DIY Bath and Body boards on Pinterest for more fun homemade soap recipes and gift ideas.

Also don’t forget to find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. You can sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY with Jojoba Oil

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY with jojoba oil is made with a combination of jojoba and other oils to keep both your hair and scalp moisturized. This hair oil treatment DIY is perfect for dry or damaged hair that struggles to keep moisturized, but is also great for all hair (and scalp) types that need a little extra love in the driest parts of winter.

I’m so excited to share this natural hair oil treatment DIY with jojoba oil with all of you. It’s not my own but rather a contributed recipe from, Melissa, of NightBlooming. Melissa sells a variety of wonderful herbal alchemy, hair accessories, and other creations in her Etsy shop. After purchasing and trying out several of Melissa’s signature oil blends as well as her luxurious henna gloss bar I was hooked. I so very much wanted to share Melissa’s creations with you and asked if she’d be willing to create a hair oil treatment DIY  to share with my readers. Melissa graciously agreed.

For this post, Melissa is sharing the recipe for her signature beauty oil blend for January. It’s called Ullassa. Keep reading to learn more about this product as well as how to make it yourself!

Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY with Jojoba Oil

Ullassa is one of the many amazing words that has no direct English translation; it means “feelings of pleasantness associated with natural beauty.” Ullassa is this month’s Signature Oil from Melissa of NightBlooming, and she’s happily shared the recipe. It focuses on using essential oils, four penetrating oils, and one sealing oil, jojoba, to lock the moisturizing goodness into both hair and scalp.

This Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY with jojoba oil is made with a combination of jojoba and other oils to keep both your hair and scalp moisturized. This hair oil treatment DIY is perfect for dry or damaged hair that struggles to keep moisturized, but is also great for all hair (and scalp) types that need a little extra love in the driest parts of winter.

Ullassa is perfect for dry or damaged hair that struggles to keep moisturized, but is great for all hair (and scalp) types that need a little extra love in the driest parts of winter. You can purchase it pre-made here, as well as custom oil blends if one or two of the ingredients don’t suit you.

Why this blend of penetrative oils + jojoba for sealing?

Natural, penetrative, oils have a high amount of fatty acids such as lauric, capric, oleic, linoleic, myristic, palmitic and caprylic acids. Their small (in a molecular sense) structure allows them to easily penetrate the scalp and hair, feeding them with vital nutrients needed for healthy hair.

The sealing oil, jojoba, is considered to be the closest to the sebum naturally produced by the scalp. This makes it an effective conditioner, moisturizer, and softener for both skin and hair and a great choice for this hair oil treatment DIY.

This Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY with jojoba oil is made with a combination of jojoba and other oils to keep both your hair and scalp moisturized. This hair oil treatment DIY is perfect for dry or damaged hair that struggles to keep moisturized, but is also great for all hair (and scalp) types that need a little extra love in the driest parts of winter.

Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY

© NightBlooming

Preparation:

Be sure to either work on an oil / essential oil safe surface, or protect the surface with a silicone mat or similar.

Ingredients:

This hair oil treatment DIY makes ½ ounce of finished oil in an amber dropper bottle.

This Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY with jojoba oil is made with a combination of jojoba and other oils to keep both your hair and scalp moisturized. This hair oil treatment DIY is perfect for dry or damaged hair that struggles to keep moisturized, but is also great for all hair (and scalp) types that need a little extra love in the driest parts of winter.

2 tsp Jojoba Oil
½ tsp Sunflower Oil
½ tsp Avocado Oil
½ tsp Rosehip Oil
½ tsp Hemp Seed Oil

This Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY with jojoba oil is made with a combination of jojoba and other oils to keep both your hair and scalp moisturized. This hair oil treatment DIY is perfect for dry or damaged hair that struggles to keep moisturized, but is also great for all hair (and scalp) types that need a little extra love in the driest parts of winter.

4 drops Jasmine Absolute
2 drops Ylang Ylang Essential Oil
4 drops Petitgrain Essential Oil
2 drops Vetiver Essential Oil
4 drops Vanilla Bourbon C02 extract

Instructions:

To create this hair oil treatment DIY, add the essential oils to an amber glass bottle first, followed by the penetrating oils. Then top with the jojoba oil. Be sure to leave enough headspace for shaking! Shake well. Store upright, as the rubber bulb will degrade faster if the bottle is stored on its side.

This Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY with jojoba oil is made with a combination of jojoba and other oils to keep both your hair and scalp moisturized. This hair oil treatment DIY is perfect for dry or damaged hair that struggles to keep moisturized, but is also great for all hair (and scalp) types that need a little extra love in the driest parts of winter.

Detailed Ingredient Information for this Hair Oil Treatment DIY:

All carrier oils should be organic, cold-pressed and hexane-free when possible.

Jojoba Oil – Jojoba Oil is found to be an ideal moisturizer and conditioner which is derived from a natural plant. Jojoba oil is produced from a desert plant called Simmondsia Chinensis whose oil is highly regarded as an effective conditioner, moisturizer, cleanser and softener for the skin and hair.

Sunflower Oil Organic Cold–Pressed Unrefined – An oil wealthy in Oleic acids with high amounts of Vitamins A, D, and E, also has beneficial amounts of lecithin, and unsaturated fatty acids. Deeply nourishing and conditioning for the skin and hair it is a natural emollient (meaning it corrects scaling and dryness), by helping upraised skin and hair cells lay flat, helping to increase shine and keep in moisture. Cold-pressed oil, also called cold-drawn, or virgin, oil, is purer than oil expressed with the aid of heat and retains more of its natural benefits.

Avocado Oil – This deep golden oil is an edible oil pressed from the fruit of the Persea americana (avocado). It is used for lubrication and in cosmetics where it is valued for its regenerative and moisturizing properties. Rich in nutrients, amino acids, and essential fatty acids, this nutritional oil is excellent for enhancing hair health. It supplies vitamins A, B, D, and E to nourish both hair follicles and the scalp. Vitamin E also acts as a protective antioxidant. It has natural humectant properties, adding and locking in moisture. The monounsaturated fatty acids will give hair a glossy shine and silky texture. The amino acids will promote the growth of new hair cells.

Rose Hip Oil – is extracted from the seeds contained in the intensely red berry-like fruits -or hips- of a wild rose-bush that grows in the cool, lush mountain rainy valleys of the southern Andes, in Chile. It is a superb hydrator with a high absorbing level, penetrating dry skin and hair almost instantly to restore a much needed moisture balance frequently lost by climatic and environmental conditions such as dryness and air toxicity.

Hemp seed Oil – Hemp seed oil is made up of 80% essential fatty acid, the highest amount of any other plant. Hemp seed oil prevents moisture loss on a physiological level; it does just not merely “coat” the skin or hair as do other oils. Hemp so closely matches our own skins lipids it is able to penetrate inside our cells and lubricate the surface between. Not only does Hemp seed oil contribute greatly to the barrier function and appearance it also has other skin benefits such as offering relief to acne, minor abrasions, psoriasis and eczema. Hemp is also the only plant oil containing Vitamin D, which is necessary for Calcium absorption, especially useful to vegans. Using Hemp seed oil is a great way to achieve soft, smooth and hydrated skin.

Jasmine Essential Oil – This oil helps to bust stress- which can drain nutrients from the body. Using jasmine oil along with coconut oil has Shown to encourage hair growth. Along with adding to the volume and length, it gives dry hair a radiant lustre.

Ylang–Ylang Essential Oil – The extract of lilies, this oil is a scalp soother and follicle stimulator. Indonesians spread the luxuriant flowers on the marriage bed of the newly weeded couples. Ylang means “flowers of flowers,” sometimes called “the perfume tree.”

Petitgrain (Citrus aurantium) – Made from the leaves and twigs of this amazing tree, it is antiseptic, antispasmodic, a natural deodorant, and nervine. Use in a hair oil will leave hair and scalp fragrant (petitgrain has woody, citrus and floral notes all in one!), while soothing and preventing bacterial and fungal growth. Blends well with lavender, rose, and sandlawood.

Vetiver Essential Oil – An oil with a sweet, heavy, earthy and woody aroma, it is a cicatrisant which speeds up new tissue growth and can speed up the disappearance of scars or other marks from the skin. An anti-inflammatory, vulenerary, and antiseptic, it promotes scalp health. Is aroma has long been lauded for being relaxing and soothing.

Vanilla Burbon CO2 Extract – Vanilla is not produced as pure essential oil. It is well advised to question the authenticity of Vanilla labeled pure essential oil. This soothing scent is perfect for relaxing and meditation.

This Ullassa Hair Oil Treatment DIY with jojoba oil is made with a combination of jojoba and other oils to keep both your hair and scalp moisturized. This hair oil treatment DIY is perfect for dry or damaged hair that struggles to keep moisturized, but is also great for all hair (and scalp) types that need a little extra love in the driest parts of winter.

Application:

How to oil your hair (excerpted from Rehabilitating Damaged Hair Naturally: A Guide)

The idea of putting oil on your hair might seem strange after years of shampoo commercials pretending that oil is the enemy and must be eradicated at all costs. Some people are adverse to the idea of oiling as they think their hair will appear greasy and dirty. Proper oiling does not make the hair look greasy; instead, it uses only a few drops of oil to keep essential moisture inside of the hair and protect it from day-to-day wear. If you oil your hair and it does appear greasy, use less oil and dry oiling on damp hair rather than dry the next time.

1. Make sure your hair is clean, damp, and tangle-free. Oiling is best done after a shower, where the hair has just been conditioned and is full of moisture.

2. Put 3–5 drops of oil in the palm of one hand. Rub your hands together for a few seconds until the oil is warm, and spread over your palms in a glossy sheen.

3. Pat your hands over your ends to put the most oil there, and then, starting at the ears, smooth your hands down the length of your hair. Do not oil the hair above your ears, as the natural sebum produced by your scalp will be enough.

4. If oiling damp hair, spread the oil through your hair with only your fingers or a wooden or horn comb. If your hair is dry, you can use a boar bristle brush to smooth the oil through the hair and give you lots of shine. If you have curly, kinky, or very damaged hair, use only your hands and fingers, as styling tools will either ruin the curl pattern or be too abrasive on delicate strands.

5. To oil your scalp, put a single drop of oil in your palm and work your fingertips into it, then spread the oil to the fingertips of the other hand. Massage the scalp with your fingertips.

Want to learn more about Melissa from NightBlooming?

Melissa of NightBlooming on EtsyMelissa grew up with a love of fantasy novels, nature, and animals. After her quest for red hair led to disaster, she doubled down on her passion for reading and experimentation, for nature and science, and set out on a journey to heal the damage and get the color she wanted, naturally. Her herbal alchemy did the trick and, once the methods and products had proven successful for others, she launched NightBlooming–a virtual garden in which to grow her brand and share it with the world.

Her husband is her lodestar, and they live together in a sweeping river valley with their mutinous cats and garden dotted with honeybees.

A professional technical writer and interactive learning designer, Melissa’s prose blends clarity and purpose with vivid description honed in her fiction writing. Her nonfiction works include Rehabilitating Damaged Hair Naturally: A Guide and Coloring Hair Naturally with Henna & other Herbs: A Guide.

The line of natural hair care products she developed, additional information, and inspiration are available at NightBlooming on Etsy here.

You can follow Melissa on her blog here as well as on instagram, twitter and pinterest.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


DIY Bath and Body Valentine’s Gifts with StickerYou!

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



(Disclosure: This post has been sponsored by StickerYou.)

Learn how to make beautiful DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with custom labels from StickerYou and three bath and body recipes perfect for gifting.

Learn how to make beautiful DIY bath and body Valentine’s gifts with custom labels from StickerYou!

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. And, if you’re like me, you can always use a little help with your homemade gifts. While I make and gift a lot of bath and body gifts, labeling those gifts can sometimes be a challenge. After all, products we store and use in the bathroom are subject to coming into contact with water and high humidity which can leave labels a smeared mess. StickerYou solved that problem for me without having to  spend a lot of money and without investing a lot of time designing my labels.

Learn how to make beautiful DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with custom labels from StickerYou and three bath and body recipes perfect for gifting.

StickerYou sent me some amazing vinyl labels to use for my DIY bath and body Valentine’s gifts. They not only look great, but work beautifully for bath and body applications. Even better, their stickers and labels can be customized in any size, shape or quantity you want using your own artwork or licensed clipart. Or just pick some of theirs!

I love the ease of StickerYou’s pre-designed templates for creating custom labels. (There’s even a label template for lip balm tubes – a product I have always struggled with creating labels for.) Or you can enter custom dimensions for your own container choice.

Learn how to make this natural rose bath salts recipe plus two more amazing DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with a little help from StickerYou!

In addition to the ease of creating your own designs on StickerYou, you’ll also find that there are no additional charges for die-cut stickers, bleeds, or cut-outs! Their customer service is both helpful and friendly and their pricing starts as low as $10. Plus every order comes with a 100% satisfaction guarantee. So whether you’re simply wanting to create gifts for friends and family, or if you’re a business needing product labels or promotional items, StickerYou is simply perfect!

Ready to make some awesome DIY bath and body Valentine’s gifts? Keep reading for three easy bath and body recipes that you can gift this Valentine’s Day!

Learn how to make this natural rose bath salts recipe plus two more amazing DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with a little help from StickerYou!

Rose Bath Salts Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

9 oz. Epsom salt
3.3 oz. pink Himalayan salt
.15 oz. safflower oil
.25 oz. organic dried rose petals
.35 oz. rose fragrance oil, optional

Instructions:

If you prefer to keep this rose bath salts recipe natural, you can substitute the fragrance oil with .05 oz. (3% dilution) rose damascena absolute or .1 oz. essential oil of your choice! In addition, if you’d like to keep the oils from floating on the surface of the bath water when used, you can also add .05% Polysorbate 80 to this recipe.

To create these rose bath salts, simply using a digital scale to weigh out all the ingredients. Mix your dry ingredients together first. Then weigh out the safflower oil and fragrance oil into a separate container (along with the Polysorbate 80 if desired) then combine the two. Mix until all of the ingredients are evenly distributed then spoon evenly into three 4 oz. spice jars. (You may need to tap the jars down to fit all of the bath salts into your containers.)

Apply your own custom labels from StickerYou for that finishing touch and your rose bath salts are ready for gifting! These also make lovely Mother’s Day gifts and wedding favors!

Learn how to make this natural rose soap recipe plus two more amazing DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with a little help from StickerYou!

Melt & Pour Rose Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

29.5 oz. white natural melt and pour soap base
.9 oz. rose fragrance oil
rose kaolin clay, to suit

Instructions:

To keep this melt and pour rose soap recipe natural, you can substitute the rose fragrance oil with .15 oz. of (3% dilution) rose damascena absolute or .3 oz. of an essential oil of your choice.

Weigh out the soap base and cut into chunks. Heat in a double boiler or in the microwave in 30 second increments until melted.

Add either a red liquid soap colorant or a small amount of rose kaolin clay until you achieve the shade of pink you’d like for your soap. Mix well.

Pour the soap into all six cavities of the Crafter’s Choice basic round silicone soap mold.

Spritz the top of the soaps with isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to remove any air bubbles and allow to harden completely.

Unmold, then wrap in foodservice film and label.

Learn how to make this DIY embedded heart soap plus two more amazing DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with a little help from StickerYou!

Embedded Heart Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

21.9 oz. clear natural melt and pour soap base
8.4 oz. white natural melt and pour soap base
.9 oz. rose fragrance oil
Crafter’s Choice crimson sparkle color bar, to suit

Instructions:

You’ll begin by making your heart embeds for this soap for which you’ll need a Wilton 6-cavity heart silicone mold.

Weigh out the clear melt and pour soap base. Cut into chunks then melt in a double boiler or in the microwave in 30 second increments. Cut off a chunk of the crimson sparkle color bar and stir into the melted base until it’s melted completely. Continue until you reach desired color. Alternately, you can also use a liquid red soap colorant.

Weigh out . 65 oz. of fragrance oil (or . 2 oz. of essential oil) and stir into the melted soap.

Pour the melted soap into all six cavities of your heart mold. Spritz the top of the soaps with isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to remove any air bubbles and allow to harden completely.

Once the heart soaps have hardened, carefully remove them from the mold.

Place a heart with the smooth side (top) down into each of the six cavities of the Crafter’s Choice basic round silicone soap mold and press firmly against the bottom of the mold.

Now weigh out 8.4 oz. of the white melt and pour soap base. Cut into chunks then melt in a double boiler or in the microwave in 30 second increments just until fully melted.

Weigh out .25 oz. of fragrance oil (or .05 oz. essential oil) and stir into the melted white soap base.

Now carefully pour the white soap base around the heart embeds in each of the mold cavities. Spritz the top of the soaps with isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to remove any air bubbles and allow to harden completely.

Once your soaps have set up, carefully remove them from the mold and wrap and label as desired.

For more DIY bath and body Valentine’s gifts visit both my DIY Bath and Body board and my DIY Valentine’s Day Gifts board on Pinterest. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Palm Free Olive and Babassu Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin!

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it’s simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

My boyfriend, James, recently wanted me to teach him to make soap. Let me begin by saying, I’m kind of a crappy teacher. The whole “instructing” thing makes me nervous which in turn makes me impatient and, as such, I come off a wee bit snippy. This is one of the primary reasons I “teach” via my blog. My friends, however, understand my quirks so it’s different with them. However, we are also kind of bad in that we let the wine flow freely while we’re crafting. So, well, um. That’s why I’m always smiling in those photos that may or may not be on instagram. Ha ha.

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

James is wonderful, and super crazy smart, so I was able to rush through all of the explanations on the chemistry of this soap and not feel like a jerk. When we got to the part where he asked when he could actually USE the soap, however, is where things fell apart. He was rather miffed he had to wait four weeks. I told him that in the meantime he could just make me cookies. Luckily he stays super busy like me. Otherwise I’d have a constant soapmaking companion encouraging me to rush unmolding my soap loaves.

Anyhow, if you’ve never ever made cold process soap before, then you should first check out my tutorial on how to make cold process soap from scratch. You may even want to watch a few YouTube videos to give you a feel for the process, but it’s not necessary. Once you’re ready, here’s the recipe!

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Palm Free Olive and Babassu Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

2.4 oz. babassu oil
12.8 oz. olive oil
.8 oz. castor oil

4.8 oz. distilled water
2.1 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 teaspoon (60% solution) sodium lactate
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8th teaspoon ultramarine blue pigment powder, optional
1 oz. Sea Salt & Driftwood fragrance oil, optional

Soap Notes:

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin.

For starters, or rather, here are some changes I would make a second time around… If you don’t let this soap recipe gel, it’s going to be soft for a bit and will take several days to unmold. I’d definitely either increase the sodium lactate to 1 Tablespoon and/or reduce the water as percent of the oil weight to 28%.

In addition, I have noted on the screenshot I took of my olive and babassu soap recipe (on SoapCalc) to use 1/4 teaspoon of pigment powder. I ended up using less as reflected in my recipe above. This gave my soap a nice baby blue color that I felt went will with the fragrance oil I chose.

The Sea Salt & Driftwood fragrance oil is a nice scent. James and I feel like it’s pretty unisex and it didn’t make me sneeze.

However, both the fragrance and the pigment powder are optional. The sugar is to help boost the bubbles a bit but you can omit it if you like.

You shouldn’t have any surprises with my olive and babassu soap recipe as indicated or with this specific fragrance oil even if you’re a beginner.

And then there’s the coarse sea salt on top…

This natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe is made using Australian black clay and fine sea salt for a luxurious spa like experience in the shower!

As my fragrance oil and color theme was kind of ocean-y, I figured I’d decorate the top with sea salt. I’ve done this many times in the past with cold process loaf soaps. For example, my natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe (pictured above.) However, it didn’t work so well for the type of mold I used this time and I had to get creative in the end. So you can either, a) omit the coarse sea salt on top for smooth, even bars or b) take your soap to art class. (I’ll tell you what I did to mine further down.)

I used this Ozera 6-Cavity Silicone Soap Mold for my olive and babassu soap recipe.

Instructions:

Taking all safety precautions you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking method to create my olive and babassu soap recipe.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water into a heat safe container.

Then, using a digital scale, weigh out the amount of lye needed.

Stir until the lye has dissolved completely, then set aside to cool.

Next, use your digital scale to weigh out the babassu, castor and olive oils. Heat in a non-aluminum pot over medium to medium-low heat on the stove until your ingredients have melted completely.

Once your ingredients have melted, remove from heat and set aside.

Allow the lye-water and your soapmaking oils to cool to between 90°F-100°F.

Once your ingredients have cooled, use a measuring spoon to measure out the sodium lactate as well as the sugar then stir into your lye water.

If you are using a pigment powder to color your soap, measure out the pigment and stir into the melted oils with a stick blender.

Now pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils and mix until you reach a light trace. Add your fragrance oil at this point if you have chosen to scent your soap and mix again.

Once your soap traces again, pour the soap batter into all six of the rectangle cavities of your silicone soap mold. (If you think you’ll need to move your soap, be sure to place the mold on a cutting board before you pour your soap for easy transfer.)

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Set your soap aside to complete the saponification process. You can check the soap 24-48 hours later to see if it’s ready to be unmolded. If it’s not, simply wait another day or two. There’s no rush. I mean, because James will tell you, you have to wait FOUR WEEKS too use it anyway and apparently that’s just INSANE. Ha!

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Once you’ve unmolded your soaps, set them aside in a cool, dry location to finish curing four to six weeks.

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Now, if you did a crazy experiment on the tops of your soap bars, it’s highly likely it can be fixed. My coarse salt on the tops of my bars kept falling off. And if I took the salt, off the soap just looked bizarre. So I improvised.

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

I simply sprinkled fine cosmetic glitter on top of my soap bars where the salt was. I then scented and tinted clear natural melt and pour soap base and drizzled over the tops of my bars, covering the salt. Not only does the salt now dissolve as you use the soap, but it kind of looks neat. Plus there’s no right or wrong way to do it. After all, they are YOUR art bars!

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

Plus I screwed up way less on this soaping gaffe than I did when I made my tea tree and sea mud soap recipe. You won’t believe how horrendous this soap looked before the fix. (You can check out the before and after transformation here.)

If you liked my palm free olive and babassu soap recipe then be sure to check out my other cold process soap recipes here. In addition you can also find more of my homemade soap recipes on my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board as well my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board.

Not ready to make my olive and babassu soap recipe? Try a homemade babassu soap sample set from Elegant Rose Boutique on Etsy! Her babassu soaps are made using only babassu, castor, apricot kernel and jojoba oils. As they don’t contain any coconut, palm or olive oil, they are great for those with sensitivities. For more of my favorites on Etsy, check out my Etsy collections here.

Simple Natural Soapmaking by Jan Berry includes recipes for Blue Agave Soap, Wild Rosehips Soap, Double Mint Sage Soap and Dead Sea Mud Spa Bar. The recipes are in tune with today’s trends―such as vegan options, shampoo and shaving bars, seasonal soaps such as Pumpkin Spice Soap and soaps highlighting popular ingredients such as goat’s milk and sea salt―while still retaining a rustic, old-fashioned feel.

Also be sure to keep your eyes peeled for a new soapmaking book by Jan Berry in August! Jan, a fellow blogger, is the author of The Nerdy Farm Wife blog, as well as the book, 101 Easy Homemade Products for Your Skin, Health & Home. Her new book, Simple Natural Soapmaking, will be released August 8th, and is available for pre-order now.

Sample recipes include Blue Agave Soap, Wild Rosehips Soap, Double Mint Sage Soap and Dead Sea Mud Spa Bar. The recipes are in tune with today’s trends―such as vegan options, shampoo and shaving bars, seasonal soaps such as Pumpkin Spice Soap and soaps highlighting popular ingredients such as goat’s milk and sea salt―while still retaining a rustic, old-fashioned feel.

And don’t forget to find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. You can sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.