Indoor Gardening and DIY Sprouts

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Now that Scott and I have moved into our new home we’re already thinking ahead to some spring gardening. The back yard has to be cleaned up, obviously, and a few plots tilled before we can any sort of planting. But in the meantime we’ve taken up a little indoor gardening. Yesterday I visited our local city market, and in addition to buy some local raised meats and vegetables, I also bought a potted herb garden from Tim of Rolling Meadows Farms.
These pots are great for both growing indoors or outdoors. But I like to keep mine handy in the kitchen by a sunny window so it’s convenient for everyday cooking. Plus, Tim will refill this pot with fresh herbs every year for just $20. And many of these plants can be sectioned and transplanted outside as they grow. There’s rosemary, sage, peppermint and thyme – all of which will come up year after year. There’s also several cold sensitive herbs that could potentially survive the winter indoors – basil, parsley – though this sometimes comes back up from seed – and oregano. I’m still itching to plant an herb garden outdoors though so I can expand my selection and have herbs for teas. I have a lavender and rosemary plant that can be transplanted from my mom’s house, and I’d really like to plant more herbs like chocolate mint, pineapple mint, lemon balm, bergamot, stevia and others.

sprout_bagAt the same time I was  considering my options for growing food indoors, I received Mountain Rose Herbs‘ monthly newsletter which lists their specials for the month. One of their specials for the month of March is 15% off their sprout bags. Sprout bags are an easy solution to growing sprouts helps to prevent 1-2 day spoilage like you get from growing sprouts in jars or solid containers. The sprout bag not only provides critical root circulation, but it’s made to last year after year and is easy to use. This bag is made from 100% hemp. To grow your sprouts, you simply add the desired amount of seed, dip the bag in water and allow to sprout.

What makes this even more fun is the cool selection of organic sprouting seeds Mountain Rose Herbs offers for sale. My interest was particularly peaked by the broccoli, brown mustard, red lentil and radish sprouting seeds. (Did you know the stalks or sprouts of radishes taste similar to turnip greens?) Mountain Rose Herbs also offers these additional sprouting seed varieties: Alfalfa, Buckwheat, Crimson Clover, Fenugreek, Red Clover, Wheatgrass, and even Chia Seeds – yes! the one used on Chia pets – whose sprouts contain Essential fatty acids alpha-linolenic and linoleic acid, mucin, strontium, 30% protein, Vitamins A, B, E, and D, and minerals including calcium, phosphorus, potassium, sulphur, iron, iodine, copper, zinc, sodium, magnesium, manganese, niacin, thiamine, silicon, and anti-oxidants. You can even create a Chia Seed gel and use it in place of part of your meal to help suppress your appetite to reach weight loss goals. (Visit Mountain Rose Herbs for more ways to prepare Chia Seeds for your dietary needs and learn more about it’s nutritional and medicinal properties.)

I mentioned to Scott about growing sprouts in our home to tie in with his culinary forte and he was very interested. So this may be something we’ll be testing in our home soon. What about you? Do you like eating sprouts? Have you ever tried growing your own?


Currently on my Wish List for New Apartment:

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About Rebecca D. Dillon

Rebecca D. Dillon is a soapmaker, DIY-er and blogger whose life is controlled daily by a dachshund. You can learn more about Rebecca by checking out her bio. Or discover more great skin care & beauty recipes by subscribing to Soap Deli News blog via email.

Comments

  1. I am jealous of your indoor herb garden, that sounds delicious. Dried basil and oregano is just not the same as the fresh kind.