Natural Face Luminizer Recipe

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This natural face luminizer recipe highlights and accents eyes, cheekbones and lips by giving skin a sheer glow without too much shine or sparkle.

Since signing up for Birch Box’s sampling program I’ve discovered a lot of really great bath and beauty products. The rms beauty™ Living Luminizer is just one of many products I’ve had a chance to try. This natural face luminizer is organic and gives skin a sheer glow without too much shine or sparkle. It’s organic ingredients are pretty basic – beeswax, coconut oil, castor oil, vitamin E oil, rosemary extract and mica. Because the Living Luminizer by rms beauty™ is $38 a pop for a .2 oz. container, I decided to craft my own version of this natural face luminizer at a fraction of the cost. In addition I also “dressed up” this natural face luminizer by molding it into pretty little flowers that fit perfectly inside 1/3 oz. lip balm pots. The results of my version of this product are pretty spot on making it perfect for highlighting cheekbones, eyelids – even lips!

This natural face luminizer recipe highlights and accents eyes, cheekbones and lips by giving skin a sheer glow without too much shine or sparkle.

Natural Face Luminizer Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7 grams beeswax
14 grams 76° melt point coconut oil
4 grams grapeseed oil
5 drops (non-GMO) vitamin E oil
5 drops rosemary extract
4 grams Super Sparkles mica powder

Directions:

To complete this project you’ll need one silicone chocolate flower mold, a digital kitchen scale, plastic transfer pipettes, a butter knife, a teaspoon and/or tablespoon, a microwave and a glass pyrex measuring cup.

Start by weighing the beeswax in a glass measuring cup. Melt in the microwave at reduced power. Watch carefully to ensure the beeswax does not smoke. Remove from microwave, then weigh out the coconut oil (around a Tablespoon) and stir into the beeswax using a butter knife. Next, weigh out the grape seed oil and add to the mixture. (I chose to use grape seed oil in place of castor oil as it absorbs easily, is non-greasy and is naturally non-allergenic.) Using a plastic pipette for each oil, you will then add five drops each of vitamin E oil and rosemary extract to your luminizer base. Finally, use a teaspoon to weigh out the mica of your choice – about three teaspoons – and to the beeswax and oils. Mix thoroughly with a butter knife, then pour evenly into four of the flower shaped molds and allow to harden. (For larger .3 oz. sized flowers of luminizer, fill three flower shaped molds completely. This will leave a little leftover for a fourth mold to use as a tester.) You can place the mold into the freezer to expedite this process.

This natural face luminizer recipe highlights and accents eyes, cheekbones and lips by giving skin a sheer glow without too much shine or sparkle.

Once your natural face luminizer has cooled and hardened completely, remove from molds and place into 1/3 oz. (10 grams) lip balm pots of your choice. To use, simply rub your fingertips across luminizer and apply to skin where desired.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

About Rebecca D. Dillon

Rebecca Dawn Dillon is a soapmaker, DIY-er and blogger whose life is controlled daily by a dachshund. You can find more of her natural skin care recipes at The Nourished Life blog as well as right here on Soap Deli News. Or learn more about Rebecca through her new blog at Becca Ink.

Comments

  1. Hi–I’m getting ready to make this and was wondering if you could sub something for the grape seed oil? Or illuminate it– what would be the consistency if it was illiminated? Could you use glycerine instead?

  2. Hi, can u make the luminizer in dry pressed powder like form???

  3. Is there anything that can sub for the Rosemary Extract? I think I have Rosemary EO.

  4. If I’m not talented enough to make, can I buy from you?

  5. Thanks for the recipe I’m going to try this one sounds easy