Cinnamon Sugar Homemade Non-Greasy Body Butter Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

This cinnamon sugar homemade non-greasy body butter recipe combines vanilla, warm ginger, cinnamon and cardamom fragrance notes with a rich, moisturizing formula that melts into skin on contact and leaves skin feeling luxuriously soft and supple with a non-greasy feel once absorbed. These make wonderful homemade Christmas gifts.

This cinnamon sugar homemade non-greasy body butter recipe is simply perfect for the holiday season! Made from a combination of three natural butters and pumpkin seed oil, the rich moisturizing formula of this homemade non-greasy body butter recipe creates a product that melts into skin on contact. Once absorbed, this cinnamon sugar scented body butter will leave skin feeling luxuriously soft and supple – not greasy – with a warm cinnamon scent.

These cinnamon sugar homemade non-greasy body butters make wonderful homemade Christmas gifts. Plus I’ve included free printable labels for your body butters to make gifting your homemade creations even easier.

This cinnamon sugar homemade non-greasy body butter recipe makes wonderful homemade Christmas gifts and comes with free printable labels to make gifting easy!

Cinnamon Sugar Homemade Non-Greasy Body Butter Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

5 oz. shea butter
.5 oz. mango butter
.3 oz. cocoa butter
.3 oz. emulsifying wax
.5 oz. pumpkin seed oil
.3 oz. white kaolin (cosmetic) clay
.3 oz. lanolin
.15 oz. cinnamon sugar fragrance oil
1 mL rosemary extract

Instructions:

Using a digital scale, begin by weighing out the shea, mango and cocoa butters and the emulsifying wax. Heat until melted in a double boiler or at 50% power in the microwave. Remove from heat.

Weigh out the lanolin and pumpkin seed oil and stir into the melted butter and wax mixture until the lanolin has dissolved completely. (Lanolin is wonderful for locking in moisture while still allowing skin to breathe! It’s great for anyone who has dry or chapped skin or washes their hands repeatedly throughout the day.)

Weigh out the clay and whisk into the melted body butter ingredients until it’s thoroughly distributed and there are no clumps.

Now weigh out the fragrance oil and stir into the body butter. (This fragrance oil is a blend of vanilla, warm ginger, cinnamon and cardamom! For a more complex fragrance you can also blend this fragrance oil with apple, vanilla and patchouli. Or simply use your own favorite fragrance oil. If you prefer an all natural body butter, you can either omit the fragrance oil entirely or instead use 2 grams by weight of essential oil.)

Finally, using a graduated transfer pipette, measure out the rosemary extract and stir. (Pumpkin seed oil – while super nourishing for skin – tends to have a shorter shelf life than some of the other carrier oils. As rosemary extract is an antioxidant, like vitamin E, it can help to extend the shelf life of the pumpkin seed oil. Alternately you can use vitamin E oil in place of the rosemary extract. Or you can also substitute your favorite “liquid at room temperature” carrier oil for the pumpkin seed oil.)

Yes, you can make this a whipped body butter!

Place the mixture in the fridge in the fridge until it becomes evenly “goopy” looking throughout. If you’d like a whipped body butter, you should whip the body butter at this point. Otherwise, mix again then pour into your containers.

I used the eco-friendly 4 oz. paperboard jars from SKS Bottle & Packaging for my body butter. This cinnamon sugar homemade non-greasy body butter recipe will fill two of the 4 oz. jars with 3.5 oz. of product by weight.

Once the body butter has fully solidified – this may take a full 24 to 48 hours depending on the temperature of your home – you can place the lids onto the jars.

This cinnamon sugar homemade non-greasy body butter recipe combines vanilla, warm ginger, cinnamon and cardamom fragrance notes with a rich, moisturizing formula that melts into skin on contact and leaves skin feeling luxuriously soft and supple with a non-greasy feel once absorbed. These make wonderful homemade Christmas gifts.

If desired, you can print out my cinnamon sugar body butter labels here onto a full sheet label, cut them out, then apply them to the lids of your jars. (WorldLabel has great prices on bulk labels.)

To use, simply scoop out a small amount – a little goes a long way! – and massage into skin. This absorbs rather quickly assuming you don’t use too much product. Once absorbed you’ll have no greasy feeling and, more importantly, you won’t be leaving little grease prints on everything.

However, as the fragrance oil used for this cinnamon sugar homemade non-greasy body butter recipe contains what I can only assume is cinnamon oil, this body butter does warm the skin slightly and therefore should not be used on sensitive areas of the body.

If you like my cinnamon sugar homemade non-greasy body butter recipe, then you may also enjoy my vanilla & fig homemade non-greasy body butter recipe, my DIY lemon verbena candle and body butter gift set and my non-greasy lavender body butter recipe.

For more of my homemade bath and body recipes as well as favorites from around the web, be sure to check out and follow my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest. If you’re looking more homemade Christmas gift ideas, you’ll also enjoy my Christmas gift idea boards on PinterestUnique DIY Christmas Gift Ideas and DIY Stocking Stuffer Sized Christmas Gifts. You can also find and follow me via Blog Lovin’ and TumblrFacebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

About Rebecca D. Dillon

Rebecca Dawn Dillon is a soapmaker, DIY-er and blogger whose life is controlled daily by a dachshund. You can find more of her natural skin care recipes at The Nourished Life blog as well as right here on Soap Deli News. Or learn more about Rebecca through her new blog at Becca Ink.

Comments

  1. Hello Rebecca,
    Just found your site and am really excited to make soap. I can’t wait to try your recipes and appreciate you sharing with everyone.
    My question is that I’ve never seen any recipes anywhere on the net with one ingredients that I seem to have plenty of for food recipes but don’t see recipes for soap. The ingredient is Coconut BUTTER. Not the oil but Butter. Is there a reason that no one uses it? Can it be substituted for Cocoa butter or Mango butter? I’m allergic to cooca (I know, it’s a drag) but it makes my heart race and sends me into hyperventilation. Sure appreciate your input on it.
    Thanks again,
    Jennie

    • I’m not familiar with coconut butter so I looked it up. You could likely substitute shea butter with coconut butter in skin care recipes as they have the closest melting point, however, this is assuming it dissolves completely when applied to skin and soaks in the same way the oil does. Cocoa butter and mango butter have a much higher melting point and it would change the final consistency of your product without compensating for the harder oils. Mango butter is a great sub for cocoa butter though. However, in soap, you couldn’t just swap without running it through a lye calc. However, I’ve never seen it on a lye calc so … I’d have to assume you’d need to experiment or use a higher superfat to be safe.

      • I refer to Coconut “butter” when Coconut Oil (76) is solid, during colder months of Fall & Winter, and it stays that way in my recipes like for body butter and scrubs and such. Obviously the coconut “butter” turns to oil during warmer months, then I refer to it as Coconut Oil and I use far less if at all as I prefer Sunflower Oil. I read up on the differences and there is a Coconut Butter made from coconut flesh ground into a paste whereas Coconut Oil is extracted from the meat. Also, coconut oil becomes clear when melted at 76 degrees, while coconut butter remains white.
        Since I don’t have a plethora of oils and butters in my stockpile, may I assume in place of Pumpkin Seed Oil I may use another, Grapeseed or EVOO, Sunflower etc?
        Also, I can’t tolerate the smell of Cocoa Butter, I wish I could! There is refined which removes the inherent scent. I use Mango in place of it, but I wonder about other hard butters like Kokum and/or illipe in place of Cocoa – would they be too hard? Thanks!

        • Coconut oil and coconut butter are two different things. Coconut oil, whether in a solid state or not, is always an oil. You can use any liquid at room temp carrier oil is lieu of the pumpkin seed oil. For cocoa butter I typically used refined especially if adding a fragrance, but you can sub with kokum, mango or illipe which are all solid at room temp.

  2. Natasha says:

    Good morning. Wanting to give this a try but don’t have the lanolin. Is it necessary? Can I sub it with something else? Thanks.

    • There’s not really a sub for lanolin. You can omit it but the final product will have a different consistency and not protect skin from the elements nearly as well.