Yogurt & Banana Soap Recipe with Organic Flax Seed Oil

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



 

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin with real banana powder and yogurt. It's made using the cold process soapmaking method with the end product yielding a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It’s made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Banana powder, made from 100% banana, is rich in both potassium and vitamin A. It’s great for those suffering from dry skin and you can even use the leftover banana powder mixed with water or milk to create a rich, moisturizing facial mask. It’s used in place of real banana in this recipe along with skin soothing yogurt powder.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe also contains organic flax seed oil. As flax seed oil tends to have a shorter shelf life, a 5% usage rate is recommended for cold process soap. Flax seed oil is an emollient that is high in essential fatty acids, vitamin E, vitamin B and minerals.

It contains the alpha-linoleic acids believed to contribute to younger looking skin. Suitable for even sensitive skin, this soothing carrier oil is found in skin care products and cosmetics that claim to help improve skin’s elasticity and reduce the appearance of cellulite.

If you’re interested in making banana soap from ripe bananas rather than a powder, you can find my oatmeal banana soap recipe made with ripe bananas here. In addition I also have two yogurt soap recipes made using fresh yogurt. I have a homemade yogurt soap recipe with chamomile here and a simple 3-oil yogurt & avocado soap recipe here.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Yogurt & Banana Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

1.6 oz. refined coconut oil
1.6 oz. castor oil
4.8 oz. babassu oil
3.2 oz. cocoa butter
17.6 oz. olive oil
1.6 oz. refined shea butter
1.6 oz. organic flax seed oil

9.75 oz. distilled water
4.25 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)
.4 oz. yogurt powder
.6 oz. banana powder
1.9 oz. fragrance oil, optional

Soap Notes:

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

I’ve included a screenshot from SoapCalc (above) to make resizing my yogurt & banana soap recipe easier. It also gives you an idea of the overall soap bar quality. (SoapCalc is great tool for anyone wanting to create their own custom soap recipes from scratch. You can learn how to create your own custom soap recipes using a lye calculator here.)

Because my yogurt & banana soap recipe is palm free, I did a steeper water discount than normal and included sodium lactate in the soap recipe to get a harder bar.

I used a coconut milk fragrance oil to scent my yogurt & banana soaps. You can use any fragrance oil of your choosing however, or simply omit it altogether.

I used two Crafter’s Choice basic round soap molds for this recipe. My yogurt & banana soap recipe yields about nine soap bars weighing around 5 oz. each.

Instructions:

You should be familiar with making cold process soap before trying this soap recipe. If you’ve never made cold process soap before – or any kind of soap in which you’re working with lye – I strongly recommend you start with a beginner soap recipe so you get a feel for the process and know you can create a successful soap. Otherwise, you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions to create this soap. You should adhere to all basic safety precautions when working with lye.

Begin by measuring out the amount of water called for in the recipe into a heat safe container. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye.

Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area. Stir the lye until it has dissolved, then set the lye-water aside.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking fats – these are all of the carrier oils and butters called for in my yogurt & banana soap recipe.

Heat until melted then set aside.

Allow the lye-water and the melted soapmaking oils to cool to around 95°F. Once they’ve reached this temperature, you’re ready to make soap.

Weigh out the sodium lactate and stir it into the cooled lye-water.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Then weigh out the yogurt and banana powders along with the fragrance oil, if desired. Add these ingredients to the melted oils and mix to combine with a stick/hand blender.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the melted oils.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace then evenly pour the yogurt & banana soap batter into the molds’ cavities. Cover if desired with plastic film or parchment paper and set aside in a safe location.

Remove the soap from your molds the next day or the day after depending on the hardness of the soap. If your soap doesn’t gel then you may need to wait an extra day or two before unmolding to get your yogurt & banana soaps to release cleanly from the molds.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Allow your yogurt & banana soap bars to cure 4-6 weeks. Once your soaps have cured, they are ready for use. Simply wrap and label as desired for personal use or gifting. You can also bevel the edges with a potato peeler if desired.

If you’re planning to sell your yogurt & banana soaps, be sure to label them according to FDA guidelines. Not sure how to label your creations? I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

For even more of my soap recipes and tutorials, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board and my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts from Soap Deli News blog to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Insect Repellent Body Butter Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



Don't let bugs ruin your summer fun! Repel mosquitoes and deer ticks with this non-greasy insect repellent body butter recipe made with natural essential oils! This insect repellent body butter is crafted with a blend of natural essential oils including lemon eucalyptus essential oil which has been shown to not only repel biting insects, but deer ticks as well.

Don’t let bugs ruin your summer fun! Repel mosquitoes and deer ticks with this non-greasy insect repellent body butter recipe made with natural essential oils! This insect repellent body butter is crafted with a blend of natural essential oils including lemon eucalyptus essential oil which have been shown to not only repel biting insects, but deer ticks as well.

With incidents of Lyme disease becoming more common, protection against ticks in wooded and rural areas where ticks prosper is super important. The Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, is spread through the bite of infected deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, causing the spread of the disease in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and north-central United States. The western blacklegged tick spreads the disease on the Pacific Coast. (Find more information on the CDC website here.)

Don't let bugs ruin your summer fun! Repel mosquitoes and deer ticks with this non-greasy insect repellent body butter recipe made with natural essential oils! This insect repellent body butter is crafted with a blend of natural essential oils including lemon eucalyptus essential oil which has been shown to not only repel biting insects, but deer ticks as well.

Lemon eucalyptus essential oil has been shown to be effective in preventing mosquito bites and is a common ingredient in some commercial mosquito repellents. According to WebMD, when applying a specific 30% lemon eucalyptus oil extract called Citriodiol three times daily you can also significantly decrease the number of tick attachments if you live in tick-infested area. (Learn what Citriodiol is here.) This extract is used in commercial products such as Mosi-guard and Repel Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus.

For my insect repellent body butter recipe, I use lemon eucalyptus essential oil at just under 5% – the maximum for a skin safe application.

Don't let bugs ruin your summer fun! Repel mosquitoes and deer ticks with this non-greasy insect repellent body butter recipe made with natural essential oils! This insect repellent body butter is crafted with a blend of natural essential oils including lemon eucalyptus essential oil which has been shown to not only repel biting insects, but deer ticks as well.

Insect Repellent Body Butter Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

.25 oz. emulsifying wax
2 oz. babassu oil
1 oz. refined shea butter
.25 oz. cocoa butter
.25 oz. camellia (tea seed) oil
.1 oz. 100% neem oil
.1 oz. isopropyl myristate
.15 oz. lemon eucalyptus essential oil
6 drops peppermint essential oil
6 drops lavender essential oil
6 drops tea tree essential oil

 Instructions:

You will need a digital scale to weigh the ingredients for my insect repellent body butter recipe. Additionally, substitutions can be made for this recipe. While I have not tested substitutions for this formula, these are my closest approximations that I believe would work.

Babassu oil and camellia oil were chosen not only for their benefits to skin, but also because they don’t feel oily or greasy when used in cosmetic applications. Babassu oil has a slightly higher melt point than regular coconut oil, however refined coconut oil can be substituted if desired. You will need to increase the amount of wax used, however, to compensate for the difference in the melt point. Fractionated coconut oil can be used in place of the camellia oil.

In addition, the shea butter can be subbed with sal butter or mango butter and the cocoa butter with another hard butter like kokum butter. The isopropyl myristate can be substituted with Cyclomethicone. Both of these products keep the end product from feeling greasy. Alternately, it can be omitted entirely.

This is a soft butter and may not remain in solid form in hot areas or outside of a temperature controlled environment. In this case I recommend increasing the emulsifying wax as needed – I chose to use emulsifying wax as it also keeps the insect repellent body butter from feeling greasy on skin as well – or substitute it with beeswax for an end product closer to a salve. You can also try 1/2 the amount of wax called for in the recipe with carnauba wax, which is vegan. In addition you can also keep my insect repellent body butter recipe as is and try adding .05 oz. of arrowroot powder.

To make this insect repellent body butter, begin by weighing out the emulsifying wax, babassu oil, shea butter and cocoa butter. Heat in the microwave at 40-50% power until melted or melt in a double boiler.

Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. Weigh out the carrier oils and stir into the melted wax and butters.

Next weigh out the isopropyl myristate and stir into the insect repellent body butter mixture.

Now weigh out the lemon eucalyptus essential oil and mix into your melted product. Using a dropper, follow with the remaining essential oils. Mix well.

Don't let bugs ruin your summer fun! Repel mosquitoes and deer ticks with this non-greasy insect repellent body butter recipe made with natural essential oils! This insect repellent body butter is crafted with a blend of natural essential oils including lemon eucalyptus essential oil which has been shown to not only repel biting insects, but deer ticks as well.

Evenly pour the body butter into two 2.3 oz. clear glass thick wall cosmetic jars with black lined caps. (I got my jars from SKS Bottle & Packaging here.)

Allow to cool completely, then screw on the lids. You can place your insect repellent body butter in the fridge to speed up the cooling process. As this recipe yields a soft, velvety butter it may take 24-48 hours to fully solidify and reach its final consistency.

To use apply the insect repellent body butter to exposed areas of skin and massage in. This body butter smells really strong at first, but the scent will mellow after about 5-10 minutes. Reapply every few hours as needed to aid in repelling biting insects.

Love your locks with these leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray recipes! Formulated especially for dry or damaged hair, these recipes both utilize the power of camellia seed oil and babassu oil. Both of these oils have similar properties in hair and skincare as coconut oil making them especially suited for those sensitive to or allergic to coconut oil.

To learn more about babassu oil and camellia oil and for more recipes you can use these ingredients in, be sure to check out my Leave In Coffee Hair Conditioner & Shine Spray Recipes. You can also follow my boards on Pinterest for even more great skincare recipes and beauty DIY’s.

Organic lemongrass citronella insect repellent spray from Pure Palette. This natural insect and mosquito repellent spray contains a blend of lemongrass, lavender, cedarwood, eucalyptus, citronella, patchouli and catnip essential oils. It is 100% natural, hand blended in a small batches, DEET Free and has a wonderful fresh, clean scent. It repels mosquitoes and many other bugs including No See Um.

If you’re looking to buy a natural insect repellent you may like this organic lemongrass citronella insect repellent spray from Pure Palette. This natural insect and mosquito repellent spray contains a blend of lemongrass, lavender, cedarwood, eucalyptus, citronella, patchouli and catnip essential oils. It is 100% natural, hand blended in a small batches, DEET Free and has a wonderful fresh, clean scent. It repels mosquitoes and many other bugs including No See Um. You can buy it online here.

Pure Palette also sells hand poured citronella outdoor candles to help deter biting insects when you’re enjoying time outdoors on your patio or deck. I just bought three of these for an upcoming cookout I’m hosting in May. You can purchase them here.

You may also be interested in the organic insect repellent stick with lemon eucalyptus essential oil from SunnyBrae Buzz. It’s formulated with essential oils that are known to repel mosquitoes, ticks, gnats, and flies and also comes in three formulations – for babies 6 months to 23 months, for kids 2 years to 15 years and for ages 16 to adult. You can buy it online here.

Additionally, Turtle Moon Health also sells a non-greasy, natural insect repellent spray with lemon eucalyptus essential oil called Nature’s Cloak Mosquite & Tick Repellent. It’s non-staining and kid friendly! You can buy it online here.

Want more? You can find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


DIY Donut Soap Made Using the Cold Process Soapmaking Method

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



If you love doughnuts but they don't love you, try making this DIY donut soap instead! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, these DIY donut soaps are formulated to be low cleansing/high conditioning bars. They're naturally colored with rose kaolin clay to mimic a "baked" pink donut and also contain watermelon fruit extract powder which is high in vitamin C and and amino acids that can help to promote rejuvenated looking skin.

If you love doughnuts but they don’t love you, try making this DIY donut soap instead! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, these DIY donut soaps are formulated to be high conditioning/low cleansing bars. They’re naturally colored with rose kaolin clay to mimic a “baked” pink donut and also contain watermelon fruit extract powder which is high in vitamin C and and amino acids that can help to promote rejuvenated looking skin.

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

In addition, this DIY donut soap recipe also contains skin conditioning camellia (tea seed) oil, babassu oil and mango seed butter. It’s then iced with a natural melt and pour soap base “donut glaze” and topped with real candy sprinkles! Keep reading to learn how to make your own DIY donut soap!

If you love doughnuts but they don't love you, try making this DIY donut soap instead! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, these DIY donut soaps are formulated to be low cleansing/high conditioning bars. They're naturally colored with rose kaolin clay to mimic a "baked" pink donut and also contain watermelon fruit extract powder which is high in vitamin C and and amino acids that can help to promote rejuvenated looking skin.

DIY Donut Soap

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

4.8 oz. mango butter
1.6 oz. castor oil
3.2 oz. babassu oil
7.35 oz. olive oil
6.4 oz. sesame oil
3.85 oz. coconut oil
4.8 oz. camellia oil

9.75 oz. distilled water
4.25 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)
.25 oz. (about 2 Tbs.) rose kaolin clay
.6 oz (about 2 Tbs.) watermelon fruit extract powder
1.7 oz. fragrance oil

Soap Notes:

DIY Donut Soap Recipe made using the cold process soapmaking method.

I’ve included a screenshot from SoapCalc (above) to make resizing the recipe for my DIY donut soap easier and so you have an idea of the overall soap bar quality. (SoapCalc is great tool for anyone wanting to create their own custom soap recipes from scratch. You can learn how to create your own custom soap recipes using a lye calculator here.)

Because my DIY donut soap is palm free, I did a steeper water discount than normal and included sodium lactate in the soap recipe to get a harder bar.

I used a sparkling limoncello fragrance oil for my donut soaps. You can use any fragrance oil of your choosing, however, be aware that if it contains vanilla, your donut soaps will turn brown.

My DIY donut soap recipe yields a baker’s dozen or 13 donut soaps.

I used this 2 pack of silicone donut molds that my boyfriend gifted me for Valentine’s Day to make these soap donuts.

Instructions:

You should be familiar with making cold process soap before trying this soap recipe. If you’ve never made cold process soap before – or any kind of soap in which you’re working with lye – I strongly recommend you start with a beginner soap recipe so you get a feel for the process and know you can create a successful soap. Otherwise, you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions to create your DIY donut soap. You should adhere to all basic safety precautions when working with lye.

Begin by measuring out the amount of water called for in the recipe into a heat safe container. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye.

Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area. Stir the lye until it has dissolved, then set the lye-water aside.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking fats – these are all of the oils and the mango butter called for in the recipe.

Heat until melted then set aside.

Allow the lye-water and the melted soapmaking oils to cool to around 95°F. Once they’ve reached this temperature, you’re ready to make soap.

Weigh out the sodium lactate and stir it into the cooled lye-water.

Then weigh out the clay, watermelon fruit powder and fragrance oil. Add these ingredients to the melted oils and mix to combine with a stick/hand blender.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the melted oils.

Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace then evenly pour the donut soap batter into the molds’ cavities. Cover if desired with plastic film or parchment paper and set aside in a safe location.

Remove the soap from your molds the next day or the day after depending on the hardness of the soap donuts. If your soap doesn’t gel then you may need to wait an extra day or two before unmolding to get your DIY donut soap to release cleanly from the molds.

Allow your donut soaps to cure 4-6 weeks. Once your soaps have cured, your ready to add the icing and sprinkles!

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

To create your soap icing you’ll need a clear melt and pour soap base. I specifically used Crafter’s Choice detergent free hemp melt and pour soap base. Cut up several ounces of the soap base into squares and melt in the microwave in 30 second increments until melted.

Next add your desired colorant for the soap glaze. I used Nurture Soap’s vibrant yellow mica. Stir in desired amount – I recommend about a quarter teaspoon – and scent if desired.

Allow the soap glaze to cool slightly. Just before it starts to solidify, you’re ready to apply the glaze.

Dip your first soap donut, top down, into the soap icing donut glaze. Turn over and place onto a cutting board or other workable surface. Immediately add candy sprinkles of your choice.

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

Repeat this process with all of the donut soaps one at time, until you’ve decorated all of your donut soaps.

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

If you prefer to add soap icing rather than a glaze to your soap donuts, simply add more colorant to the clear melt and pour soap base, allow to cool but not solidify, then drizzle as desired across each of the soaps.

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

You’ve now made your own DIY donut soap! All that’s left is to wrap and label your soaps as desired for personal use or gifting. (These make fantastic party favors!) If you’re planning to sell your homemade donut soaps, be sure to label them according to FDA guidelines. Not sure how to label your creations? I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

For even more of my soap recipes and tutorials, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board and my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts from Soap Deli News blog to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


DIY After Sun Moisturizers to Soothe Sunburned Skin

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



DIY After Sun Moisturizers to help soothe sunburned skin and promote healing.

Well, spring is here and it’s in full force. I got sunburned on my neck and collarbone yesterday simply driving the car with the windows down! Luckily I had sunscreen on my face but it was an important reminder that we should be applying sunscreen to our décolletage as well. Of course, there are times we do forgot sunscreen. Or we didn’t apply it often enough. Or it wasn’t strong enough. So here are three DIY After Sun Moisturizers to help soothe sunburned skin and promote healing.

3 DIY After Sun Moisturizers

Quench parched sunburned skin with this easy spray on silky after sun moisturizer recipe. Hemp and jojoba oils naturally moisturize skin without clogging pores while cyclomethicone helps give this after sun moisturizer a silky smooth feel that's not heavy or greasy.

This Silky After Sun Moisturizer Spray Recipe quenches sunburned skin with moisturizing hemp seed and jojoba oils. The addition of cyclomethicone adds a silky smooth feel that’s not heavy or greasy while also helping to protect skin from irritating clothing. It also contains natural vitamin E to promote healing while calming lavender and chamomile essential oils round off the finished product for an after sun moisturizer that’s sure to please. Learn to make it here.

This natural After Sun Skin Soother Cream Recipe is made from natural skin nourishing oils, shea butter, essential oils and aloe vera gel. It's perfect for replenishing those stubborn spots of dry skin or for soothing and speeding up the healing process after a sunburn.

My Sun + Skin Soother After Sun Cream Recipe is made from natural skin nourishing oils, shea butter, essential oils and aloe vera gel. It’s perfect for replenishing those stubborn spots of dry skin or for soothing and helping to promote healing after a sunburn. It’s made with Mountain Rose Herbs’ Restorative Skin Oil which is also lovely all on its own. The much revered and time-tested formula is well suited for mature skin, and perfect to use when running into problems with dry and other “leathery” or “lizardy” skin appearance. Learn to make this sun + skin after sun moisturizer here.

This natural burn relief spray recipe was created for a friend with breast cancer to help soothe the pain caused by radiation treatment and promote healing. However, you'll find this burn relief spray also works great on run of the mill sunburns.

My natural burn relief spray recipe is also a wonderful after sun moisturizer that you can spray on. It contains a special blend of natural ingredients to soothe the pain caused by sunburns. It’s ingredients include arnica infused oil and neem oil. Arnica, like neem oil, not only has analgesic (meaning it relieves pain) properties, but it also helps with inflammation. Learn to make it here.

What are your favorite ingredients to include in DIY after sun moisturizers? Leave your thoughts in the comments!

For even more great skincare recipes and beauty DIY’s, be sure to follow my boards on Pinterest.

You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Leave In Coffee Hair Conditioner & Shine Spray Recipes

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



Love your locks with these leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray recipes! Formulated especially for dry or damaged hair, these recipes both utilize the power of camellia seed oil and babassu oil. Both of these oils have similar properties in hair and skincare as coconut oil making them especially suited for those sensitive to or allergic to coconut oil.

Love your locks with these leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray recipes! Formulated for dry or damaged hair, these recipes both utilize the power of camellia seed oil and babassu oil. Both of these oils have similar properties in hair and skin care as coconut oil making them especially suited for those sensitive to or allergic to coconut oil.

Like fractionated coconut oil, camellia seed oil is liquid at room temperature and has a long shelf life – two years! One of the best kept secrets in the cosmetic and hair care industry, this carrier oil has been shown to improve the tone and texture of skin as well as reduce the appearance of aging. It’s a highly hydrating oil, however, it’s quickly and easily absorbed by the skin – much in the same way fractionated coconut oil is – and leaves skin feeling silky smooth, not greasy. In addition, it’s been traditionally used as both a hair conditioner as well as a treatment to strengthen brittle nails for centuries.

Love your locks with these leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray recipes! Formulated especially for dry or damaged hair, these recipes both utilize the power of camellia seed oil and babassu oil. Both of these oils have similar properties in hair and skincare as coconut oil making them especially suited for those sensitive to or allergic to coconut oil.

Camellia seed oil won’t dry out skin or clog pores, yet it contains more oleic acid than olive oil. It also contains vitamins, A, B, and E, various minerals and Squalene. As it’s been shown that a deficiency of squalene can lead to dry skin and premature aging, this constituent makes camellia seed oil a valuable ingredient in anti-aging skin care recipes. Suitable for all skin types, including sensitive skin, this oil soothes and calms easily irritated skin and helps to smooth dry, flaky skin. Regular use of camellia oil can help to protect skin from age spots as well as soften wrinkles and fine lines around your eyes and mouth. It also offers some protection from UV rays.

Babassu oil also has similar properties to regular coconut oil. It is a semi-solid at room temperature with a melting point around body temperature – slightly higher than coconut oil’s 76°F. It’s increasingly being used as a substitute for coconut oil and is liked for it’s benefits for both oily and dry skin. It won’t leave skin feeling oily or greasy when used in skin and hair care products and it’s a gentle natural moisturizer that won’t strip hair’s natural oils.

In addition babassu oil contains a high amount of skin beneficial fatty acids including lauric, stearic, myristic, palmitic and oleic acid. It’s also rich in vitamin E, a natural antioxidant, and has anti-inflammatory properties. It’s great for an itchy scalp, dry skin and hair. In hair care, it conditions and helps restore hair’s elasticity and health. The shelf life for babassu oil, properly stored, is also two years.

Love your locks with these leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray recipes! Formulated especially for dry or damaged hair, these recipes both utilize the power of camellia seed oil and babassu oil. Both of these oils have similar properties in hair and skincare as coconut oil making them especially suited for those sensitive to or allergic to coconut oil.

Got it? Awesome! So I know everyone has their own preferences for the hair and skin care products they make, so I created two versions of my leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray. One contains cyclomethicone – a popular synthetic silicone used in hair and skin care products to make them sprayable as well as to improve oil absorption – and one does not. Cyclomethicone is often used in skin care formulations so they feel smooth and silky whereas without this ingredient they may feel greasy.

The alternate recipe is slightly different. It doesn’t contain cyclomethicone, so it’s completely natural, but does contain a slightly different ratio of ingredients so it will still work in a spray bottle if desired. Alternately, you can also use the non-cyclomethicone version in a glass amber bottle with a dropper. Ready to get started? Just pick your favorite leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray recipe below.

Love your locks with these leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray recipes! Formulated especially for dry or damaged hair, these recipes both utilize the power of camellia seed oil and babassu oil. Both of these oils have similar properties in hair and skincare as coconut oil making them especially suited for those sensitive to or allergic to coconut oil.

Leave in Coffee Hair Conditioner & Shine Spray Recipe (with Cyclomethicone)

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

.25 oz. babassu oil
.75 oz. camellia seed oil
.35 oz. jojoba oil
.15 oz. castor oil
.5 oz. Cyclomethicone
24 drops coffee essential oil

Instructions:

If necessary, place your container of babassu oil into a bowl of hot water to melt.

Then, using a digital scale, weigh out the oils and cyclomethicone and combine in a glass Pyrex measuring cup or similar.

Add 24 drops of coffee essential oil (or less if desired) and mix well.

Use a small funnel to pour into a 2 oz. bottle. I used a 2 oz. amber PET Boston round bottle with a smooth black fine mist sprayer. You can find the same bottles with sprayers that I used at SKS Bottle & Packaging.

Add a label if desired – you can download and print the “coffee hair conditioner & shine spray” labels I used here – and print onto a full page label sheet. (I got my labels in bulk from WorldLabel. They have great prices!) Then simply cut out the labels and apply to your container(s.)

To use lightly spray one or two pumps of your leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray onto wet hair depending on length and massage into hair, scalp, and ends. Alternately you can spray one or two pumps into your palm and apply to hair, ends first, working your up.

To add shine to a completed style, lightly mist onto dry, styled hair.

This product will hydrate dry hair, add shine and smooth frizz for healthy looking hair.

If your hair isn’t dry or damaged and you instead want to control light frizz or add shine, I recommend storing this conditioner in a bottle with a dropper instead. Rub one to two drops onto the palms of your hands then scrunch the ends of your hair before then lightly smoothing your hands over the rest of your hair.

And, yes! Your hair will smell like coffee. If you want to smell less like coffee – which increases circulation and therefore believed to stimulate hair growth – then use less coffee essential oil. Alternately try combining 12 drops of coffee essential oil with 6-12 drops of cocoa absolute or even a cocoa vanilla absolute blend for a little bit of heaven.

Love your locks with these leave in coffee hair conditioner & shine spray recipes! Formulated especially for dry or damaged hair, these recipes both utilize the power of camellia seed oil and babassu oil. Both of these oils have similar properties in hair and skincare as coconut oil making them especially suited for those sensitive to or allergic to coconut oil.

Leave in Coffee Hair Conditioner & Shine Serum Recipe (without Cyclomethicone)

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

.25 oz. babassu oil
1.3 oz. camellia seed oil
.35 oz. jojoba oil
.1 oz. castor oil
24 drops coffee essential oil

Instructions:

If necessary, place your container of babassu oil into a bowl of hot water to melt.

Then, using a digital scale, weigh out the oils and and combine in a glass Pyrex measuring cup or similar.

Add 24 drops of coffee essential oil (or less if desired) and mix well.

Use a small funnel to pour into a 2 oz. amber PET Boston round bottle with a smooth black fine mist sprayer.

Add a label if desired – you can download and print the “coffee hair conditioner & shine serum” labels I used here – and print onto a full page label sheet. Then simply cut out the labels and apply to your container(s.)

Follow the same useage guidelines as the above recipe. And, also be sure to try this as a body oil as well! It’s to die for!

For even more great skincare recipes and beauty DIY’s, be sure to follow my boards on Pinterest.

You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.