Castile Soap Recipe with Bee Pollen Powder

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This homemade Castile soap recipe is made with bee pollen powder which has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.

While a traditional, pure Castile soap recipe is made using 100% olive oil, a modern Castile soap recipe may contain additional oils so long as olive oil is part of the Castile soap recipe and it consists of all vegetable oils. However Dictionary.com offers a looser definition defining Castile soap as any hard soap made from fats and oils, often partly from olive oil. While Merriman-Webster defines it as fine hard bland soap made from olive oil and sodium hydroxide; also : any of various similar soaps. An example of a modern, non-traditional Castile soap would include Dr. Bronner’s well known liquid Castile soaps.

However some soapmakers prefer to make a distinction between a traditional Castile soap with 100% olive versus an all vegetable soap with olive oil and would call this a Bastille soap instead. Regardless of your preference, as there are discrepancies across the cottage soapmaking industry in what one considers Castile, I recommend labeling your soaps with a full ingredient list if you are selling this soap so consumers are aware that this is not a 100% Castile soap bar.

My homemade Castile soap recipe is made using 50% olive oil combined with palm oil and coconut oil to create a Castile soap that’s both harder and lathers better than a traditional Castile soap bar.

In addition I’ve also added bee pollen powder to my Castile soap recipe. Bee pollen has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties and is often used in skin care products to help calm inflammatory conditions and common skin irritations such as psoriasis or eczema. Further, the amino acids and vitamins naturally found in bee pollen are believed to help protect skin as well as aid in cell regeneration.

As my family and I tend to suffer from dry skin in the winter I also added a small amount of lanolin to this Castile soap recipe for it’s moisturizing properties. However, the lanolin is optional and can be omitted if you prefer not to use it to keep to a true to an all vegetable soap. I just thought I’d offer it as an option for those who enjoy the feel lanolin adds to soap like I do. (It’s one of those “I started out with an idea and then I had another idea I threw in a the end because I just couldn’t resist” sort of things.) Alternately you could also increase the amount of superfat in this soap and run the numbers back through a lye calculator to get the new amount of lye needed with your changes.

This homemade Castile soap recipe is made with bee pollen powder which has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.

Bee Pollen Castile Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

18 oz. pomace olive oil
10.8 oz. sustainable palm oil
7.2 oz. refined (76° melt point) coconut oil
.5 oz. lanolin, optional (for a non-Castile bar)

11.8 oz. distilled water
4.9 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

2 – 2.5 oz. fragrance oil, optional (for a non-Castile bar)
3 Tablespoon bee pollen powder

Soap Notes:

Water as % of oils = 33%
6% superfat
1 oz. fragrance oil per pound

The lanolin is not figured into the SAP value for this Castile soap recipe so omitting the lanolin or changing the amount of lanolin used will not affect the amount of lye needed for this recipe.

The oils were used at the following percentages: Olive oil=50%, Coconut oil=20% and Palm oil at 30%.

If you prefer not to use palm oil you can easily sub lard for the palm oil which has a similar SAP value and soapmaking properties without having to recalculate the lye. However, if you are resizing this soap recipe and subbing the palm oil with lard you’ll want to run it back through a lye calc just to be sure.

I used a Sandalwood Patchouli fragrance oil from Wholesale Supplies Plus for this Castile soap recipe. As this fragrance has 5% vanilla content it did turn the soap a light brown. Also as this fragrance is a bit on the stronger side I used only 2 oz. of fragrance oil. However in keeping with not having any artificial ingredients in a Castile soap recipe, you can use half the amount in essential oils instead if desired or leave it unscented.

This cold process Castile soap recipe yields 10-12 bars of soap that will weigh around 4 oz. each depending on how they are cut and fits inside my DIY wooden loaf soap mold.

Instructions:

You’ll need to follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions to make this Castile soap recipe. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s another good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, using a digital scale weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the soapmaking oils and lanolin, if desired, using a digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat over medium heat until melted then remove from heat and set a side to cool.

When both the lye-water and oils have cooled to 90°-95°F you’re ready to make soap. Begin by measuring out the bee pollen powder with a measuring spoon and add to the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until fully incorporated.

Now, pour the lye-water into the oils. Mix using a stick blender until you reach a light trace. Add fragrance oil if you’re using one and then mix again until well blended and soap is at a medium-heavy trace.

Pour the soap into your prepared mold.

How to make homemade soap with a honeycomb textured top.

If you’d like a “honeycomb” textured top on your bars of homemade soap, cut a piece of bubble wrap to fit the size of your mold and press it onto the top of the freshly poured soap. Otherwise lightly cover the soap and allow to set for 24 hours. (Discover more behind the scenes pics like this one by following me on Instagram!)

This homemade Castile soap recipe is made with 50% olive oil and bee pollen powder which has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.

After 24 hours remove the bubble wrap from the top of your soap loaf and unmold the soap.

This homemade Castile soap recipe is made with 50% olive oil and bee pollen powder which has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.

Now cut your soap into bars and allow the soap to cure 4-6 weeks before use. Wrap and label as desired.

Now try out my traditional Castile soap recipe found here.

If you liked my Castile soap recipe be sure to also try my Neem Oil & Bee Pollen Skin Cream Recipe. This natural neem oil and bee pollen skin cream recipe combines the healing power of neem oil with the skin soothing, anti-inflammatory properties of bee pollen to help improve problem skin issues including acne, shingles, cold sores, minor cuts and abrasions, athlete’s foot, eczema and psoriasis. Feedback I’ve received via my Facebook page include the following: “I tried this recipe and it healed a cold sore in record time.” and “I shared a little jar with my co-worker who had surgery recently and she told me that it’s healing her up and softening her keloid scarring as well. That is a bonus!Learn how to make it here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes as well as bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also follow me on Pinterest for collections of not only my homemade soap recipes and beauty DIY’s but also some of my favorites from around the web.

Keep track of all my new homemade soap recipes and other DIY creations by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.

Neem Oil & Bee Pollen Skin Cream Recipe

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

This neem oil and bee pollen skin cream recipe is made from natural ingredients and harnesses the healing power of neem oil and the soothing anti-inflammatory properties of bee pollen.

This natural neem oil and bee pollen skin cream recipe combines the powerful skin care properties of neem oil with the skin soothing, anti-inflammatory properties of bee pollen.

Natural bee pollen is used topically in skin care products to help calm inflammatory conditions and common skin irritations such as psoriasis or eczema. In addition the amino acids and vitamins naturally found in bee pollen are believed to help protect skin as well as aid in cell regeneration.

Neem oil is a naturally anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and antifungal carrier oil that has shown to be an effective treatment for those who suffer from dry itchy skin, redness and skin irritation as well as psoriasis, eczema, scabies, acne, skin ulcers and even head lice. I also found that neem oil’s strong anti-viral properties can also offer some relief from the pain of shingles. This is based on my grandmother’s experience with my non-greasy lavender body butter recipe I made her for Christmas. It contained a smaller amount of neem oil, however after several applications on the first day of use her pain was diminished.

This neem oil and bee pollen skin cream recipe is made from natural ingredients and harnesses the healing power of neem oil and the soothing anti-inflammatory properties of bee pollen.

Neem Oil & Bee Pollen Skin Cream Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

1.5 oz. cocoa butter
1 oz. sesame oil
.25 oz. lanolin
.25 oz. traditional emulsifying wax
.25 oz. rosehip seed oil
.25 oz. neem oil
2 ml patchouli essential oil
1 ml lavender essential oil
1/2 Tablespoon bee pollen powder (approx. .15 oz.)
1 teaspoon arrowroot powder (approx. .1 oz.)
1 ml vitamin E oil
5 drops rosemary extract, optional
.1 oz. Optiphen Plus (paraben free preservative, optional)

Instructions:

To make this bee pollen skin cream recipe, begin by using a digital scale to weigh out the cocoa butter and emulsifying wax into a glass Pyrex measuring cup. Heat at 60% power in the microwave until the ingredients have fully melted. Remove carefully using a pot holder or tea towel as the glass will be hot. (Alternately you can use a double boiler.)

Using measuring spoons measure out the bee pollen and arrowroot powder. Stir into the melted wax and butter until the arrowroot powder has fully dissolved. You may want to use a stick blender for best results if you have one and to avoid a gritty feeling in the final product.

Weigh out the lanolin and stir into the mixture until it dissolves completely.

Now weigh out and add the sesame oil, rosehip seed oil and the neem oil. Mix to combine.

Once the mixture reaches 160°F or less use graduated transfer pipettes to measure out and add the essential oils, rosemary extract and vitamin E. Next, weigh out and add the Optiphen Plus. Mix well with a whisk or fork then pour into containers and allow to fully set up.

Notes:

This cream does take a while to fully thicken even if you place it in the refrigerator. It can take up to TWO to THREE full days before reaching its final consistency. So be patient. Also as this is a natural product it is affected by temperature more than commercial products. If you live in a warm climate or your house temperature is above 74°F this cream may liquify or lose it’s creamy consistency. (It’s a steady 70°-72°F in my house at this time of the year so I haven’t been able to see how it reacts under warmer temps.) In this case you can either increase the amount of emulsifying wax used – I’d start at additional .1 oz. – or you can swap the emulsifying wax with beeswax. However beeswax will make this product a bit stickier and lend it a more salve like consistency.

To use simply apply to skin as desired on problem areas affected by acne, shingles, cold sores, minor cuts and abrasions, athlete’s foot as well as any other minor skin irritations including eczema and psoriasis.

Here’s some feedback I’ve received on this bee pollen skin cream recipe via my Facebook page: “I tried this recipe and it healed a cold sore in record time.” and “I shared a little jar with my co-worker who had surgery recently and she told me that it’s healing her up and softening her keloid scarring as well. That is a bonus!”

For more care recipes as well as natural alternatives to commercial products follow my boards on Pinterest. You can keep up with all of my new skin care recipes and homemade soap recipes by simply following me on Blog Lovin’ or Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus and Instagram.

Homemade Honeycomb Soap Recipe

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

This homemade honeycomb soap recipe is so easy to make and includes bee pollen praised for its soothing skin properties. Makes a thoughtful homemade gift idea for the holidays.

This homemade honeycomb soap recipe is so easy to make and is formulated with natural bee pollen praised for it’s natural skin soothing properties. Used in topical products, bee pollen is shown to calm inflammatory conditions and common skin irritations like psoriasis or eczema. In addition the amino acids and vitamins naturally found in bee pollen help to protect the skin and aid in cell regeneration. I scented mine with a sandalwood patchouli fragrance oil, however you can scent them with a honey fragrance oil or nothing at all to suit your tastes or skin care needs.

I created these homemade honeycomb soaps using a round guest sized soap mold so you can make a lot of these without a lot of raw materials. This makes them perfectly suited as homemade stocking stuffer gifts or  even DIY wedding favors.

This homemade honeycomb soap recipe is so easy to make and is formulated with natural bee pollen praised for it's natural skin soothing properties. Used in topical products, bee pollen is shown to calm inflammatory conditions and common skin irritations like psoriasis or eczema.

Homemade Honeycomb Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

3.7 oz. natural white melt and pour soap base
.1 oz. fragrance oil (or .05 oz. essential oil)
1/2 teaspoon bee pollen powder
1/2 teaspoon 24k Gold Sparkle Loose Mica Pigment Powder, optional

Supplies you’ll need:

digital kitchen scale
basic guest round silicone soap mold
glass Pyrex measuring cup
large kitchen or Chef’s knife
spray bottle with rubbing alcohol
measuring spoons
stirring utensil
bubble wrap
scissors
microwave

Instructions:

This homemade honeycomb soap recipe yields three guest soaps. Increase the recipe as needed for additional soaps. The mold has six cavities so this recipe is easily doubled to fill the entire mold.

Begin by using a pair of scissors to cut the bubble wrap into circles to fit into three of the mold cavities. Place one piece of bubble wrap into a mold cavity with the “bubble” side up.

Using your digital scale weigh out the melt and pour soap base. Cut into chunks and place into a glass Pyrex measuring cup. Heat in short bursts until the soap is completely melted. Melting times will vary depending on the base you use.

Carefully remove the cup of soap from the microwave using a pot holder or towel. Using a measuring spoon measure out the mica and bee pollen and stir into the melted soap base. (I like to use a fork so I can whisk the ingredients in sort of like making scrambled eggs.)

Now weigh out the fragrance oil or essential oil you’re using (if any) and stir into the soap.

Before pouring the soap into the mold sprinkle a bit of gold mica onto the top of the bubble wrap. This will give the soap extra definition and sparkle. Directly follow with the soap base pouring the melted base evenly into each of the three mold cavities you have prepared.

Allow the soap to cool and harden completely. You can speed this up a bit by placing the mold in the refrigerator however abstain from placing the mold in the freezer as it can damage it.

This homemade honeycomb soap recipe is so easy to make and includes bee pollen praised for its soothing skin properties. Makes a thoughtful homemade gift idea for the holidays.

Once the soaps have fully set gently unmold then wrap as desired. I place each of my soaps into Make ‘n Mold Clear 6″ x 3.75″ Treat Bags then tied each one with baker’s twine.

This homemade vanilla fig scented non-greasy body butter recipe yields rich moisture with the natural skin protection of lanolin that doesn't feel greasy and absorbs quickly. Makes a lovely homemade gift idea paired with homemade soaps.

For a larger homemade gift idea pair your homemade honeycomb soaps with my delectable vanilla fig scented non-greasy body butter. You can find the recipe for my non-greasy body butter here. You may also like my stocking stuffer sized festive holiday homemade cranberry orange soap recipe.

For more homemade bath and body recipes be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also find more skin care recipes and homemade Christmas gift ideas by following my Pinterest boards. If you’d like to read more from Soap Deli News be sure to follow me on Tumblr, Blog Lovin’, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.