Coffee and Cocoa Soap Recipe

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This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it’s palm free!

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Since making homemade coffee soap in 2015, I’ve been dying to make another. My homemade coffee soap recipe was, and still is, one of my most favorite homemade soap recipes of all time. This time around I also wanted to add cocoa powder for a coffee and cocoa soap recipe. At the last minute, and probably because I was craving brownies at the time, I decided to add a whole egg to this recipe as well.

In the same year I formulated my coffee soap recipe, I also made my first egg soap! Also making my list of favorite soap recipes of all time, my homemade egg soap recipe calls for two egg yolks. So I figured I’d mix it up a bit this go round and simply used an entire egg!

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Why egg?

Well, eggs are believed to offer skin care benefits that include tightening skin, shrinking pores, and calming redness and breakouts. In cold process soap, egg yolks are treated as a fat. As such they help to give egg soap a rich, thick lather. Egg whites, on the other hand, contain no fat whatsoever. However, they do contain protein which has an astringent effect on skin.

Want to make your own? Here’s how!

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Coffee and Cocoa Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

3 oz. babassu oil
1 oz. castor oil
2 oz. unrefined cocoa butter
2 oz. refined coconut oil
10 oz. olive oil
2 oz. safflower oil

6.6 oz. strong brewed coffee
2.7 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

1 Tablespoon + 1 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder
1 egg, tempered
1 Tablespoon (60% solution) sodium lactate
1.25 oz. fragrance oil, optional

Soap Notes:

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

For my original coffee and cocoa soap recipe, as stated previously, I had not intended on using egg. As it was a last minute addition, and this recipe has a high percentage of olive oil, you may want to reduce the amount of coffee (as percentage of oil weight) to 30% (6 oz.) Definitely do this if you are preventing your soaps from going through gel phase. Otherwise you will probably need an extra day or two to unmold these cleanly. It does firm up nice once unmolding though.

In addition, if you are using a fragrance oil – I did not – definitely reduce the amount of coffee. A hot fudge brownie fragrance oil would blend nicely with this soap as would a coffee or chocolate fragrance oil. Or perhaps chocolate cappuccino or chocolate cream cupcake?

Without a fragrance oil the chocolate smell really starts to come through after about a week. It smells a little weird until then, but don’t worry. It’ll smell fantastic regardless of whether or not you choose to use a fragrance.

To make my coffee that is used in place of the water in this recipe, I brewed 4 rounded Tablespoons in just over the amount of water called for in the recipe. (As we all know, those grounds can be greedy and some of the water content stays trapped in them.) I won’t lie and say I didn’t use a mocha latte flavored coffee because I totally did. Regular coffee would work just fine though.

Also, a nice substitution for the unrefined cocoa butter in this recipe would be dark cocoa butter wafers. In this instance you could omit the cocoa powder entirely, or leave it in to make it extra chocolatey!

In addition, your egg will need to be room temperature to use in my coffee and cocoa soap recipe. So you may want to remove it from the refrigerator several hours before you intend to make this soap. You’ll also want to make your coffee ahead of time so it has time to cool to room temperature as well.

Finally, I used the Crafter’s Choice basic round silicone soap mold for this recipe. But you can adapt the recipe to fit your own mold if you like.

(For information on the properties of my coffee and cocoa soap recipe as well as percentages and superfat used, simply refer to the screenshot of this recipe from SoapCalc above.)

Instructions:

Ready? Let’s get started!

You do need to be familiar with making cold process soap for this recipe. You’ll follow my basic cold process soapmaking instructions. If you’ve never made cold process soap before – or any kind of soap in which you’re working with lye – I strongly recommend you start with a beginner soap recipe so you get a feel for the process and know you can create a successful soap.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

You’ll begin by mixing your lye-water. Or, in this case, lye-coffee.

Measure out the amount of (room temperature) coffee needed into a heat proof container.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Then, using a digital scale, weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the coffee in a well ventilated area, stirring until the lye has dissolved completely. (You’ll want to take proper safety precautions when working with lye. Gloves and eye protection are recommended.)

Set the lye-coffee aside to cool.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Next, use your digital scale to weigh out the cocoa butter and soapmaking oils. Heat in a non-aluminum pot over medium to medium-low on the stove until your ingredients have melted completely. Alternately, you can also heat them at 50% power in your microwave in a large glass Pyrex measuring cup until the cocoa butter has melted.

Once your ingredients have melted, remove from heat and set aside.

Allow the lye-coffee and your butter-oil mixture to cool to room temperature or around 76°F.

Using a measuring spoon, measure out the sodium lactate and stir it into your lye-coffee.

Now temper your egg. To do this, remove about a cup of oil from your soapmaking oils. Whisk the entire egg (no shell, of course) into the oils.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Using measuring spoons, measure out the unsweetened cocoa powder. Use a stick blender to incorporate the cocoa powder into the oils.

Return the oil with the egg mixed into it, to this container and mix again briefly.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Now pour the lye-coffee into the oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace. Please note that my coffee and cocoa soap recipe does take a while to trace.

If you’re using a fragrance oil, add it at light trace and keep mixing until the soap batter is like a light pudding.

Pour the soap batter into all six of the mold’s cavities so each is filled. Then go back and circle any remaining soap on top of the soap you just poured.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

If desired, you can add whole coffee beans or another decorative element or soap embed to the top of each of your soaps as an accent.

Allow your soap to set up for at least 48 hours before unmolding. If your soap doesn’t seem like it’s going to come out of the mold easily – especially if it didn’t gel – you can place the mold in the freezer for about a half hour or simply wait an extra day or two. (This mold is thicker than a lot of other silicone molds and therefore it can be more difficult to push the soap out cleanly.)

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Because it’s winter and much colder in my house right now, I got soda ash on the tops of my soaps. However, I loved the contrast between the color of the soda ash and the color of the soap and the coffee beans so I left it on my soaps. If you don’t like the way it looks, you can simply steam or wash it off.

Allow to cure four to six weeks before using.

Don’t have time to make my coffee and cocoa soap recipe? Be sure to check out my check out my favorite coffee and chocolate themed artisan products on Etsy for homemade coffee and cocoa soaps you can buy! Or try Starboard Soap Co.’s Farm Fresh Egg Soap.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking board as well my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe

This post may contain affiliate links. Please see my disclosure policy.

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

My son, like me, suffers from dry skin in the winter and asked if I could make him a really moisturizing soap for his skin. In the end I settled on a high conditioning/low cleansing double butter soap recipe made with 20% cocoa butter, 10% shea butter, and an 8% superfat. I also added corn silk powder to my recipe for it’s gentle exfoliating properties and a silky feel. And, to help curb potential skin issues, I also included a small amount of neem oil in the recipe as well.

My son’s other request for this homemade soap was that it make him “smell like a man.” So I scented it with a mahogany teakwood fragrance oil. Fragrance however, is optional, and you can either leave this double butter soap recipe unscented when you make yours or use a fragrance oil of your choice instead.

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

Before you get started on my luxury double butter soap recipe, there are a few things you should know. One, this soap recipe is NOT recommended for beginners. This soap moves really quickly and there’s a good chance it can and will seize up on you. Therefore you should soap at as low a temperature as possible and you may want to mix this one by hand. Should you use a stick blender, be prepared for this soap to basically act like you’re making it using the hot process soapmaking method should it seize.

If and when it does seize on you, simply wait for it to gel. (It will look translucent when it does this.) Then continue mixing if needed and pour (spoon) into your mold at this point. You can also wait for it to hit gel stage if you like before adding your fragrance. Unlike hot process soap however, you won’t need to add heat once you mix the oils, butter and lye-water as it’s going to heat up on its own and do all the work for you.

Two, I’m providing two separate soap recipe options for this double butter soap recipe – one with palm oil and one without – so that the final bars are as similar in properties as possible. I made mine with palm oil as I still have leftover palm oil I’m trying to use up. Palm oil can and will speed up trace and can contribute to the soap seizing. However, should you decide not to use palm oil, it may slow things down a bit for you. (Learn more about using palm oil and find more of my palm free cold process soap recipes here.)

Three, the neem oil in my double butter soap recipe is completely optional but I do highly recommend it. Probably my favorite carrier oil, neem oil is a common ingredient in skin and hair care products and is often used to treat problematic skin conditions including eczema and rosacea. It’s a moisturizing oil with regenerative properties and its naturally rich in vitamin E and essential fatty acids. It is also anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-fungal. While neem oil, as a stand alone product, has a strong odor, this scent is easily masked with natural essential oils or fragrance oils. (Click here to find more of my skin care recipes that contain neem oil.)

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (with Palm Oil)

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7.2 oz. cocoa butter
3.6 oz. shea butter
5.4 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
10.8 oz. olive oil
1.8 oz. castor oil
5.4 oz. palm oil
1.8 oz. palm kernel flakes
.25 oz. 100% neem oil, optional

 11.5 oz. distilled water
4.8 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

2 oz. – 2.5 oz. fragrance oil, optional
1 Tablespoon (60% solution) sodium lactate, optional
1 Tablespoon corn silk powder, optional

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (with Palm Oil)

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (Palm Free)

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7.2 oz. cocoa butter
3.6 oz. shea butter
7.2 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
10.8 oz. olive oil
1.8 oz. castor oil
5.4 oz. lard
.25 oz. 100% neem oil, optional

 11.5 oz. distilled water
4.8 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

2 oz. – 2.5 oz. fragrance oil, optional
1 Tablespoon (60% solution) sodium lactate, optional
1 Tablespoon corn silk powder, optional

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (Palm Free)

Instructions:

Both of these luxury double butter soap recipes will fit into one of my DIY wooden loaf soap molds and will yield approximately 10-12 bars depending on how thick you cut them.

You’ll need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking method instructions when making this homemade soap. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe to get you started. This is not a good soap recipe for beginner soapmakers.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Choose the double butter soap recipe you’d like to make, then begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the soapmaking oils using your digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until all the oils have melted, then remove from heat and set aside to cool.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to 85°F to 90°F – or room temp if it’s within your experience and comfort level – you’re ready to make soap.

Start by measuring out the corn silk powder with a measuring spoon and add to your melted soapmaking oils. Use a stick blender to combine until the soapmaking oils are free of clumps and the corn silk powder has been evenly distributed. As there’s the likelihood this soap may potentially seize, you may want to weigh out the fragrance oil and add it at this time as well rather than waiting til trace. Alternately, it can be added after the soap gels.

Now measure out the liquid sodium lactate and stir it into the lye-water. (Sodium lactate is used to make a harder bar of soap.)

Next, slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace. If the soap seizes, be patient. Wait for the soap to gel, then mix again and pour (or spoon) into your mold. Leave the soap uncovered overnight.

You should be able to unmold your soap the next day.

Once you’ve removed your soap from the mold, cut into bars then allow to cure 4-6 weeks before use.

Want to learn how to create your own custom cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator? See my tutorial on creating cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking and DIY Bath and Body boards on Pinterest. Or keep up with all of my new homemade soap, bath and beauty recipes by following me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.