Summer Citrus Soap Recipe with a Natural Essential Oil Blend

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

This homemade summer citrus soap recipe contains a citrus inspired natural essential oil blend of peppermint, orange and lemongrass. Formulated to be both cleansing and conditioning, this natural soap works great at tackling sweat and grime without over drying skin.

Summer Citrus Soap Recipe with a Natural Essential Oil Blend. This homemade summer citrus soap recipe contains a citrus inspired natural essential oil blend of peppermint, orange and lemongrass. Formulated to be both cleansing and conditioning, this natural soap works great at tackling sweat and grime without over drying skin.

Because I have hard water and dry skin throughout the winter months, I’ve been formulating a lot of high conditioning/low cleansing soap recipes. However with the arrival of spring and the heat of summer on the way, I thought I’d create a new soap recipe with extra cleansing power. After all, real women sweat – even if we don’t like people to know about it.

Recently I’ve been dating a guy originally from the deep South. His name is Greg. He found his way to Roanoke by way of Florida on to Georgia then South Carolina. Now he’s here. He’s a carpenter now by trade. So he tends to get dirty. As such, he was super psyched about me making a homemade soap that tackles tough grit, grime and sweat. Me? well I’m psyched he actually uses homemade soap and not some surfactant infused body wash. (If you’re a soapmaker then you understand my dilemma entirely.)

Summer Citrus Soap Recipe with a Natural Essential Oil Blend. This homemade summer citrus soap recipe contains a citrus inspired natural essential oil blend of peppermint, orange and lemongrass. Formulated to be both cleansing and conditioning, this natural soap works great at tackling sweat and grime without over drying skin.

Greg calls this homemade soap recipe the Florida Gators soap. To be quite frank, I don’t follow sports. And I have absolutely no idea what sport the Gators play. What I do know is that orange is their color. And seeing as how Florida is the sunshine state, Greg thought it fitting to scent this homemade soap with a blend of orange and citrus.

Where my sports education is lacking however, I was properly schooled on Jacksonville, where Greg attended college. The culture of which was all readily explained via a Katt Williams comedy show at the Florida Theater.

Shop for Handmade Artisan Soaps on Etsy.

But I digress. I made a sweet summer citrus soap recipe with natural essential oils – which is the point of this entire post. Greg helped me make it and rather enjoyed the process. (Hooray! It’s always nice to have a new partner in crime, isn’t it? Also my dog loves Greg and to me, that kind of says everything.)

So, as they like to say, without further ado, here is my summer citrus soap recipe for your soapmaking pleasure. I hope you enjoy it!

Summer Citrus Soap Recipe with a Natural Essential Oil Blend. This homemade summer citrus soap recipe contains a citrus inspired natural essential oil blend of peppermint, orange and lemongrass. Formulated to be both cleansing and conditioning, this natural soap works great at tackling sweat and grime without over drying skin.

Summer Citrus Soap Recipe with Natural Essential Oils

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

.8 oz. castor oil (5%)
4.8 oz. refined coconut oil (30%)
2.4 oz. jojoba oil (15%)
2.4 oz. mango butter (15%)
5.6 oz. pomace olive oil (35%)

4 fl. oz. distilled (or filtered) water
2 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1/8 teaspoon red iron oxide powder
1/8 teaspoon yellow oxide powder
.15 oz. peppermint essential oil
.15 oz. 5-fold orange essential oil
.25 oz. blood orange essential oil
.35 oz. lemongrass essential oil
Dash of petitgrain essential oil

Soap Notes:

As my summer citrus soap recipe doesn’t yield a particularly hard bar, I used a steep water discount. The water weight for this recipe is 25% of the oil weight. Additionally the super fat is 6%. While the essential oil weight is 5% of the oil weight in this recipe (based on recommended usage for these essential oils in cold process soap.)

You can use this information, if desired, to resize my summer citrus soap recipe using a lye calculator. Or to make changes to the super fat or water percentage. Learn more about using a lye calculator to adjust a homemade soap recipe or to craft your own custom homemade soap recipes with the information found in this tutorial.

Getting Started:

Begin by gathering the materials you’ll need for this soapmaking project. You will need a digital scale, a digital thermometer, an immersion blender and this 6-cavity silicone mold.  Additionally, you’ll also need aluminum free, heat safe containers and utensils for mixing your soap.

You should also take necessary safety precautions when working with lye. If you are unfamiliar with making cold process soap, I recommend this soapmaking tutorial to get you started. I also offer several beginner soap recipes to try before attempting this soap including this beginner soap recipe and my palm free olive & babassu soap recipe.

Instructions:

Begin by preparing the lye solution for my summer citrus soap recipe. To do this, measure out the distilled water into a heat safe container. In a separate container, weigh out the lye called for in the recipe. Then pour the lye into the water – I recommend a well ventilated area – and mix until the lye has completely dissolved. Now set the lye-water solution aside in a safe location to cool.

While the lye solution cools, weigh out the soapmaking oils and the mango butter. Combine in a stainless steel pot. Then gently heat the oils and mango butter on the stove over low heat just until the mango butter has melted.

Remove the soapmaking oils from heat and allow to cool.

In the meantime, measure out the colorants for my summer citrus soap recipe. Then weigh out the essential oils and combine in a small glass beaker.

Once the oils have reached 90°-95°F you are ready to make soap.

Check the temperature of both the soapmaking oils and the lye solution before you begin. Both of these ingredients should be within ten degrees of one another.

Now add the red iron and yellow oxide colorants to the soapmaking oils. Mix briefly with an immersion blender to incorporate the colorant throughout the oils.

Next, pour the lye solution into the soapmaking oils and mix with the immersion blender until you reach a light trace. You’ll know you’ve reached trace when you drag the blender through the soap batter and it leaves a visible trail behind. It’s a little like pudding.

Add the essential oils to the soap batter, then continue mixing until thoroughly combined.

Once you bring the soap to a medium trace, pour the soap into each of the cavities of your mold. Then gently cover the soap with plastic wrap or parchment paper.

Set the soap aside for 24-48 hours. After this time you can unmold your summer citrus soap bars.

Allow your soap to cure for four to six weeks in a cool, dry location. After that, your homemade soaps are ready to use.

Summer Citrus Soap Recipe with a Natural Essential Oil Blend. This homemade summer citrus soap recipe contains a citrus inspired natural essential oil blend of peppermint, orange and lemongrass. Formulated to be both cleansing and conditioning, this natural soap works great at tackling sweat and grime without over drying skin.

Get Creative with My Summer Citrus Soap Recipe

Once your cold process summer citrus soaps have cured, you can get creative! I was able to use one bar of my summer citrus soap to make three round orange slice soaps.

To create your own round soaps that resemble orange slices, cut one bar of the summer citrus soap in half lengthwise. Then cut each half into triangles. Set aside.

Now cut a block of clear melt and pour soap base into chunks. (The amount you use will depend on how many soaps you plan to make as well as the size of your mold’s cavities.) Combine in a Pyrex measuring cup or another heat safe container. Melt in the microwave in 20-30 second increments, stirring after each heating.

Once the clear soap base has completely melted, add a yellow liquid soap colorant to the base until you reach the desired color. (Or you could also use a liquid blue soap colorant. Go Gators!)

If desired, add a fragrance or essential oil of your choice. (I used blood orange essential oil for this step at 2% of the soap weight.) Then stir the soap to incorporate the fragrance evenly throughout the soap.

Now pour a small amount of the melt and pour soap into three cavities of a round silicone mold. Then spray the soap with isopropyl alcohol to remove any air bubbles.

Next, place the triangle soap embeds you made from the summer citrus soap into the soap you just poured. Arrange the embeds as desired.

Once the melt and pour soap base is firm – you don’t want your embeds to shift – spray the soap again with isopropyl alcohol. Then pour the remaining melt and pour soap base into the same three cavities of the mold. Fill the cavities to the top of the mold, then spray again with isopropyl alcohol to remove any air bubbles.

Once the soap has fully hardened, remove the soap slices from the mold. Then, if desired, you can bevel the edges of the soap using a potato peeler. Now simply wrap your soaps tightly in food service film to store until use.

Natural Blood Orange Soap Recipe for Summer. This blood orange soap recipe is made with orange powder and blood orange essential oil which has anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and antibacterial properties making it a great homemade soap for acne prone and combination skin.

More Homemade Soap Recipes

If you like my summer citrus soap recipe with natural essential oils, then you may also want to try my homemade blood orange soap recipe. Made using blood orange essential oil and orange powder, this summer inspired soap is painted with mica for a fun, fresh appearance.

Some of my other favorite homemade soap recipes include the following:

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin and promoting skin elasticity, apple powder also has moisturizing properties that make it suitable for even dry or mature skin.

Or simply explore all my cold process soap recipes here. Alternately, you can find my melt and pour soap recipes here.

You can also find more homemade soap recipes by way of my DIY Bath & Body Pinterest board and my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board. Or, if you’d rather purchase handmade soaps, you can discover a collection of my favorite handmade artisan soaps on Etsy here.

Don’t forget to stay in touch!

For more homemade bath, body, beauty and soap recipes, be sure to  find and follow Soap Deli News across all of your favorite social media platforms including G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram as well as subscribe to Soap Deli News via email for future updates, DIY projects and recipes.

Plantain Soap Recipe with Date Sugar & Frankincense

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

Nourish dry skin and promote skin health with this natural plantain soap recipe with date sugar and frankincense.

Plantain Soap Recipe with Date Sugar & Frankincense! This natural soap recipe is handmade using the cold process soapmaking method. Perfect for dry or problem skin, this homemade plantain soap recipe produces low cleansing, super nourishing soap bars with an exceptional lather. Discover the recipe for this palm free plantain soap recipe now at Soap Deli News blog. #soap #plantainsoap #soaprecipe #soapmaking #diy #crafts

Last summer I made a wonderful plantain herbal oil infusion with dried wild harvested plantain leaves and olive oil. As I still had some of my plantain infused olive oil leftover from my last project for vegan solid lotion bars, I decided to put the rest of it to good use!

What’s the Story with Plantain?

Plantain is often times considered a weed. However, in actuality, this plant is a powerful medicinal herb with strong anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-microbial properties. As such plantain is commonly used as a topical home remedy to promote healing, soothe insect bites and reduce the appearance of scars. You can learn more about plantain here

My homemade plantain soap recipe produces a low cleansing, super nourishing soap with a wonderful lather that your entire family will love. Made with a few fun ingredients like date sugar and French green clay, this palm free soap is formulated specifically for dry skin and scented with frankincense essential oil.

Learn about the different types of frankincense essential oil here.

You will need to make your own plantain infused olive oil for this plantain soap recipe. If you aren’t able to harvest wild plantain in your area, you can purchase plantain leaves online. Alternately you can also purchase solar infused plantain herbal oil. I highly recommend shopping with Mountain Rose Herbs for quality organic options.

How to Make Herbal Infused Oils using both the solar infusion method and the quick method for heat infusing oils via Mountain Rose Herbs. Plus a fantastic palm free, natural plantain soap recipe made with plantain infused olive oil that's perfect for dry skin!

How to Make Plantain Infused Olive Oil

To make your plantain infused olive oil, you’ll first need to harvest and dry your plantain leaves. Once dry, fill a small mason jar three-fourths of the way full with plantain leaves. Then cover the leaves with olive oil. You want the oil to come about an inch higher than the plantain leaves. (You can use either pomace olive oil or virgin olive oil for this plantain soap recipe.)

Now place the mason jar in a sunny window for 2-3 weeks. You’ll also want to shake the herbal infusion at least once a day. After 2-3 weeks have passed, use cheesecloth or a mesh strainer to drain the oil from the plantain leaves. For a more detailed explanation on creating herbal infused oils, be sure to check out this blog post for making DIY herbal infused oils from Mountain Rose Herbs. You’ll also find a quick method for infusing herbs in oils using heat.

Plantain Soap Recipe with Date Sugar & Frankincense! This natural soap recipe is handmade using the cold process soapmaking method. Perfect for dry or problem skin, this homemade plantain soap recipe produces low cleansing, super nourishing soap bars with an exceptional lather. Discover the recipe for this palm free plantain soap recipe now at Soap Deli News blog. #soap #plantainsoap #soaprecipe #soapmaking #diy #crafts

Natural Plantain Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

6.4 oz. plantain infused olive oil (40%)
.8 oz. castor oil (5%)
4 oz. refined coconut oil (25%)
.8 oz. refined shea butter (5%)
4 oz. safflower oil (25%)

4.8 fl. oz. distilled water
2.2 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 Tablespoon French green clay
2 Tablespoons natural date sugar
.25 oz. frankincense essential oil

Instructions:

Before you begin, you’ll need to make sure you take all necessary safety precautions when working with lye. This includes wearing eye protection and gloves as well as ensuring none of your containers or utensils are made from aluminum.

You will follow my cold process soapmaking tutorial in order to make this soap. (If you’ve never made homemade soap, I recommend starting with a beginner’s soap recipe which you can find here.)

My plantain soap recipe has a 30.5% water discount and 6% superfat. It will yield six homemade soap bars when using this rectangle silicone mold.

Begin my measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces into a heat safe container. Then using a digital scale (I recommend this Bakers Math Scale) weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water and stir until it has completely dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking oils and combine in a stainless steel pot or heat safe container. Heat on the stove top or at reduced power in a microwave or crock pot until melted. Remove from heat, then set aside to cool.

Once the lye-water and soapmaking oils reach about 90°-95°F, you’re ready to make soap!

Measure out the French green clay and date sugar, then mix them into the soapmaking oils using an immersion or stick blender.

Plantain Soap Recipe with Date Sugar & Frankincense! This natural soap recipe is handmade using the cold process soapmaking method. Perfect for dry or problem skin, this homemade plantain soap recipe produces low cleansing, super nourishing soap bars with an exceptional lather. Discover the recipe for this palm free plantain soap recipe now at Soap Deli News blog. #soap #plantainsoap #soaprecipe #soapmaking #diy #crafts

Then slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils and mix with your stick blender until you reach a light trace.

Weigh out the frankincense essential oil and add to the soap batter. Then continue mixing to fully incorporate the scent. Once you reach a medium to heavy trace, pour the soap batter into your soap mold.

Cover the mold with plastic cling wrap if desired, then set aside in a safe location where it won’t be disturbed.

Your plantain soaps should be ready to unmold 24-48 hours later.

Once you’ve unmolded your homemade soaps, set them aside in a cool location for a minimum of four weeks to cure. These soaps do smell a little funky at first, but after curing the scent of the frankincense does come back out in the soap.

Plantain Soap Recipe with Date Sugar & Frankincense! This natural soap recipe is handmade using the cold process soapmaking method. Perfect for dry or problem skin, this homemade plantain soap recipe produces low cleansing, super nourishing soap bars with an exceptional lather. Discover the recipe for this palm free plantain soap recipe now at Soap Deli News blog. #soap #plantainsoap #soaprecipe #soapmaking #diy #crafts

Now all that’s left is to wrap and label as desired for personal use or gifting.

Want to Sell Your Homemade Soaps?

If you’re planning to sell your plantain soaps, you’ll need to label them according to FDA guidelines. The book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale instructs you in layman’s terms on how to properly label your homemade soaps for sale.

Love my plantain soap recipe with date sugar and frankincense? Then you may also like my other recent palm free soap recipes for making ginger mint soap and orange spice tea soap. Or check out my entire collection of both melt and pour and cold process homemade soap recipes here.

Don’t Miss A Single Post!

Be sure to follow me across all of your favorite social media platforms! You can find me on PinterestG+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram as well as subscribe to Soap Deli News via email for future updates, DIY projects and recipes.

Also, don’t forget. If you make homemade soaps or bath & body products I’d love to see them! Simply add the hashtag #soapdelishowoff to your instagram posts!

Natural Homemade Raspberry Cold Process Soap Recipe

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

This natural homemade raspberry cold process soap recipe is made with real ripe raspberries which are naturally rich in antioxidants which help to prevent and repair skin damage.

This natural homemade raspberry cold process soap recipe is made with ripe raspberries which are naturally rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants have been shown to help to prevent and repair skin damage caused by free radicals. In addition because antioxidants protect cells and encourage cell growth they are also believed to be helpful in an in fighting fine lines and wrinkles.

This natural homemade raspberry cold process soap recipe is made with ripe raspberries which are naturally rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants have been shown to help to prevent and repair skin damage caused by free radicals. In addition because antioxidants protect cells and encourage cell growth they are also believed to be helpful in an in fighting fine lines and wrinkles.

Natural Raspberry Cold Process Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

3.6 oz. refined (76° melt point) coconut oil
1.1 oz. castor oil
22.3 oz. pomace olive oil
5.4 oz. lard (pig tallow)
3.6 oz. palm kernel flakes

8 fluid oz. distilled water
4.9 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

3 oz. ripe raspberries
.5 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)

Soap Notes:

The water discount was figured at around 30.6% as this raspberry cold process soap recipe has a high amount of olive oil which typically makes for a softer soap. (The steeper water discount and sodium lactate will help your soap harden faster so you can unmold the loaf and cut it into bars the next day.) The water then was again discounted by 3 oz. to account for the 3 oz. of raspberries used.

The raspberries account for approximately 8.3% of the total oil weight.

You can use virgin olive oil in lieu of pomace olive oil in this soap recipe, however you’ll find that pomace is not only less expensive, it also traces faster.

This raspberry cold process soap recipe was calculated using 6% super fat.

You can substitute palm kernel oil for the palm kernel flakes in this soap recipe without having to change the amount of lye needed. However, if you are resizing the recipe you should run the numbers back through a lye calculator.

You can use a fragrance for this cold process soap recipe. If desired use up to 2.25 oz. of your favorite body safe fragrance oil; half for essential oils.

This raspberry cold process soap recipe was formulated to be extra conditioning. Adding 1/2 Cup of powdered goat milk or coconut milk powder to the soapmaking oils just before adding the lye-water will add further skin conditioning benefits. Another fun alternative would be to add a small amount of coconut flakes to the batch when you add the raspberries.

This raspberry cold process soap recipe will yield 10-12 bars of soap approximately 4 oz. each depending on how they are cut and fits inside my DIY wooden loaf soap mold.

Instructions:

To make this raspberry cold process soap recipe, you’ll need to follow your basic cold process soapmaking method instructions. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, using a digital scale weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the coconut, castor, and olive oils along with the palm kernel flakes and lard using a digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until melted, then remove from heat and set aside.

Next, weigh out the sodium lactate and raspberries separately and set aside.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to around 90°-95°F you’re ready to make soap.

You can puree your raspberries prior to making soap if desired using a food processor. However, I simply added my raspberries directly to the melted soapmaking oils and pureed them in the pot using my stick blender. Once the raspberries were fully incorporated in the oils with no chunks, I then added the sodium lactate to the cooled lye-water and stirred.

Now slowly pour the lye-water mixture with the sodium lactate into the soapmaking oils with the pureed raspberries. Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace. If you are using a fragrance add the fragrance at a light trace then mix fully until the fragrance is fully incorporated and you get a medium trace on the soap.

Pour the soap into your prepared soap mold and leave uncovered. (This soap gets very hot during saponification and the top will crack if you over insulate it.) Set aside for 24 hours.

This natural homemade raspberry cold process soap recipe is made with ripe raspberries which are naturally rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants have been shown to help to prevent and repair skin damage caused by free radicals. In addition because antioxidants protect cells and encourage cell growth they are also believed to be helpful in an in fighting fine lines and wrinkles.

After 24 hours your can unmold your homemade soap loaf and cut it into bars. Allow bars to cure 4-6 weeks before use, then wrap and label as desired.

For more of my homemade soap recipes as well as bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to follow me on Pinterest for collections of not only my homemade soap recipes and beauty DIY’s but also some of my favorites from around the web.

Keep track of all my new homemade soap recipes and other DIY creations by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.

Castile Soap Recipe with Bee Pollen Powder

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

This homemade Castile soap recipe is made with bee pollen powder which has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.

While a traditional, pure Castile soap recipe is made using 100% olive oil, a modern Castile soap recipe may contain additional oils so long as olive oil is part of the Castile soap recipe and it consists of all vegetable oils. However Dictionary.com offers a looser definition defining Castile soap as any hard soap made from fats and oils, often partly from olive oil. While Merriman-Webster defines it as fine hard bland soap made from olive oil and sodium hydroxide; also : any of various similar soaps. An example of a modern, non-traditional Castile soap would include Dr. Bronner’s well known liquid Castile soaps.

However some soapmakers prefer to make a distinction between a traditional Castile soap with 100% olive versus an all vegetable soap with olive oil and would call this a Bastille soap instead. Regardless of your preference, as there are discrepancies across the cottage soapmaking industry in what one considers Castile, I recommend labeling your soaps with a full ingredient list if you are selling this soap so consumers are aware that this is not a 100% Castile soap bar.

My homemade Castile soap recipe is made using 50% olive oil combined with palm oil and coconut oil to create a Castile soap that’s both harder and lathers better than a traditional Castile soap bar.

In addition I’ve also added bee pollen powder to my Castile soap recipe. Bee pollen has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties and is often used in skin care products to help calm inflammatory conditions and common skin irritations such as psoriasis or eczema. Further, the amino acids and vitamins naturally found in bee pollen are believed to help protect skin as well as aid in cell regeneration.

As my family and I tend to suffer from dry skin in the winter I also added a small amount of lanolin to this Castile soap recipe for it’s moisturizing properties. However, the lanolin is optional and can be omitted if you prefer not to use it to keep to a true to an all vegetable soap. I just thought I’d offer it as an option for those who enjoy the feel lanolin adds to soap like I do. (It’s one of those “I started out with an idea and then I had another idea I threw in a the end because I just couldn’t resist” sort of things.) Alternately you could also increase the amount of superfat in this soap and run the numbers back through a lye calculator to get the new amount of lye needed with your changes.

This homemade Castile soap recipe is made with bee pollen powder which has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.

Bee Pollen Castile Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

18 oz. pomace olive oil
10.8 oz. sustainable palm oil
7.2 oz. refined (76° melt point) coconut oil
.5 oz. lanolin, optional (for a non-Castile bar)

11.8 oz. distilled water
4.9 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

2 – 2.5 oz. fragrance oil, optional (for a non-Castile bar)
3 Tablespoon bee pollen powder

Soap Notes:

Water as % of oils = 33%
6% superfat
1 oz. fragrance oil per pound

The lanolin is not figured into the SAP value for this Castile soap recipe so omitting the lanolin or changing the amount of lanolin used will not affect the amount of lye needed for this recipe.

The oils were used at the following percentages: Olive oil=50%, Coconut oil=20% and Palm oil at 30%.

If you prefer not to use palm oil you can easily sub lard for the palm oil which has a similar SAP value and soapmaking properties without having to recalculate the lye. However, if you are resizing this soap recipe and subbing the palm oil with lard you’ll want to run it back through a lye calc just to be sure.

I used a Sandalwood Patchouli fragrance oil from Wholesale Supplies Plus for this Castile soap recipe. As this fragrance has 5% vanilla content it did turn the soap a light brown. Also as this fragrance is a bit on the stronger side I used only 2 oz. of fragrance oil. However in keeping with not having any artificial ingredients in a Castile soap recipe, you can use half the amount in essential oils instead if desired or leave it unscented.

This cold process Castile soap recipe yields 10-12 bars of soap that will weigh around 4 oz. each depending on how they are cut and fits inside my DIY wooden loaf soap mold.

Instructions:

You’ll need to follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions to make this Castile soap recipe. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s another good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, using a digital scale weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the soapmaking oils and lanolin, if desired, using a digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat over medium heat until melted then remove from heat and set a side to cool.

When both the lye-water and oils have cooled to 90°-95°F you’re ready to make soap. Begin by measuring out the bee pollen powder with a measuring spoon and add to the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until fully incorporated.

Now, pour the lye-water into the oils. Mix using a stick blender until you reach a light trace. Add fragrance oil if you’re using one and then mix again until well blended and soap is at a medium-heavy trace.

Pour the soap into your prepared mold.

How to make homemade soap with a honeycomb textured top.

If you’d like a “honeycomb” textured top on your bars of homemade soap, cut a piece of bubble wrap to fit the size of your mold and press it onto the top of the freshly poured soap. Otherwise lightly cover the soap and allow to set for 24 hours. (Discover more behind the scenes pics like this one by following me on Instagram!)

This homemade Castile soap recipe is made with 50% olive oil and bee pollen powder which has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.

After 24 hours remove the bubble wrap from the top of your soap loaf and unmold the soap.

This homemade Castile soap recipe is made with 50% olive oil and bee pollen powder which has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.

Now cut your soap into bars and allow the soap to cure 4-6 weeks before use. Wrap and label as desired.

Now try out my traditional Castile soap recipe found here.

If you liked my Castile soap recipe be sure to also try my Neem Oil & Bee Pollen Skin Cream Recipe. This natural neem oil and bee pollen skin cream recipe combines the healing power of neem oil with the skin soothing, anti-inflammatory properties of bee pollen to help improve problem skin issues including acne, shingles, cold sores, minor cuts and abrasions, athlete’s foot, eczema and psoriasis. Feedback I’ve received via my Facebook page include the following: “I tried this recipe and it healed a cold sore in record time.” and “I shared a little jar with my co-worker who had surgery recently and she told me that it’s healing her up and softening her keloid scarring as well. That is a bonus!Learn how to make it here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes as well as bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also follow me on Pinterest for collections of not only my homemade soap recipes and beauty DIY’s but also some of my favorites from around the web.

Keep track of all my new homemade soap recipes and other DIY creations by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.