Pine Tar Soap Recipe for Psoriasis, Eczema and Other Skin Issues

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites.

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe.

Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites. I also found that using pine tar soap to bathe my dog calmed and soothed his flea dermatitis.

I was a little hesitant about making pine soap for the first time as I’d never worked with pine tar before and wasn’t sure what to expect. However, the pine tar was something like the consistency of real maple syrup and not at all difficult to use. I did make a small 12 oz. test batch first just to go through the process and get a feel for things. But it was absolutely not necessary. Just remember to allow your lye-water and oils to cool to around 80° F and hand stir with a spatula rather than a stick blender. It’s a pretty steady process with the soap batter gradually reaching trace in about the same amount of time a regular soap batch with a stick blender would. Nothing seized or went awry so you shouldn’t feel rushed to get the soap into the mold.

Since I created two batches of this soap – one 12 oz. batch and one 16 oz. batch – I figured I’d go ahead and share both of those recipes with you. On my test batch I threw some turquoise mica in a small amount of the soap batter and spread it on top just to see what it would do. The color held, though I don’t think the turquoise was particularly pretty against the natural brown color of the pine tar soap. However, if you’d like to color your pine tar soaps so they aren’t a drab brown, it is an option if you’re using mica.

I’ll share my 16 oz. pine tar soap recipe first followed by the smaller 12 oz. recipe. The 16 oz. recipe fits into this Ozera 6-Cavity Silicone Soap Mold quite nicely and will give you uniform bars that don’t need to be cut. The two recipes are incredibly similar. However, I like the 12 oz. recipe the best and found it hardened up much faster.

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites.

Pine Tar Soap Recipe (16 oz. batch)

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

9.6 oz. olive oil
3.2 oz. coconut oil
.8 oz. castor oil
2.4 oz. pine tar

5 oz. distilled water
1.9 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

1 Tablespoon (60% solution) sodium lactate
.15 oz. eucalyptus essential oil
.1 oz. tea tree oil

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites. I also found that using pine tar soap to bathe my dog calmed and soothed his flea dermatitis.

Soap Notes:

Here’s my pine tar soap recipe from where I ran it through a lye calculator. This recipe doesn’t have any palm oil so you really need to add the sodium lactate to firm it up. It’s rather soft without it. Also I do recommend discounting the water a little further which is why my pine tar soap recipe differs slightly from the screenshot of what I initially came up with. If you don’t discount your water further or your soap doesn’t gel, it may need an extra day or two in the mold so it comes out clean.

If you’d like to start with a harder bar right off the bat, you can use around 30% sustainable palm oil in your pine tar recipe – though keep in mind palm oil does speed up trace a bit – or you can use lard. Of course there are many many other variations of oils and butters you can experiment with, but for the sake of creating a beginner recipe, I left it simple.

I have also been considering, however, making this again and including neem oil in the recipe since it also helps with many of the same skin issues. I’d likely reduce the amount of pine tar to 10% and use 5% neem oil, although 15% pine tar and 5% neem oil could work as well.

This pine tar soap recipe, which is basically the same as my test best but with the addition of tea tree, is mild with a nice creamy lather just several days after unmolding. However, for the mildest bar possible and a harder bar that will help your soap last longer, I highly recommend resisting the urge to use these a week in and let these cure a full four to six weeks.

The essential oil of course are optional. But I added them for their skin and hair care properties. In regards to fragrance, the essential oils make very little difference in the scent of the soap. The final soaps still smelled very reminiscent of the pine tar in the can. my 16 oz. pine tar soap recipes yields six bars of soap when using the Ozera 6-Cavity Silicone Soap Mold.

Instructions:

To make your pine tar soap you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions for the most part. Begin by making your lye-water. Measure out the amount of water needed into a heat proof container.

Then, using a digital scale, weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area, stirring until the lye has dissolved completely. (You’ll want to take proper safety precautions when working with lye. Gloves and eye protection are recommended.)

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites. I also found that using pine tar soap to bathe my dog calmed and soothed his flea dermatitis.

Next, use your digital scale to weigh out the olive, coconut and castor oils as well as the pine tar. (I specifically used the Bickmore Pine Tar which is creosote free.) Heat in a non-aluminum pot over medium to medium-low heat until your ingredients have melted completely. Alternately, you can heat this one rather quickly at 50% power in your microwave as well in a large glass Pyrex measuring cup. (Note that I did not heat my oils and pine tar in the Pyrex on the stove.)

Once your ingredients have melted, remove from heat and set aside.

Once your ingredients have melted, remove from heat and set aside.

Allow the lye-water and your oil and pine tar mixture to cool to room temperature or around 80°F.

Now measure out the sodium lactate and stir it into your lye-water.

Weigh out the essential oils, if you like to use them, and stir them into your melted oils and pine tar.

Placing your sold mold on a cutting board will make it easy to transport if needed prior to time to unmold your soaps.

Prepare you soap mold by placing it on a wooden cutting board or similar for easy transport in case it’s necessary to move your soap prior to it being ready to unmold.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the melted oils and pine tar and stir by hand until you reach a medium-heavy trace.

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites. I also found that using pine tar soap to bathe my dog calmed and soothed his flea dermatitis.

Pour the soap batter into your mold cavities.

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites. I also found that using pine tar soap to bathe my dog calmed and soothed his flea dermatitis.

If desired, level the tops of the soap you just poured with your spatula or the back of a butter knife.

Set your soap aside in safe location where it won’t be disturbed. Wait at least 24 hours before attempting to unmold your soap. If after 24 hours your pine tar soap does not seem like it will come cleaning out of the mold, simply wait another day or two.

Unmold your pine tar soap and set aside in a cool dry location to cure for four to six weeks.

Whew. That was easy. Now here’s the test batch recipe.

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites. I also found that using pine tar soap to bathe my dog calmed and soothed his flea dermatitis.

Pine Tar Soap Recipe (12 oz. batch)

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7 oz. olive oil
2.6 oz. coconut oil
.6 oz. castor oil
1.8 oz. pine tar

3.9 oz. distilled water
1.45 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

1 teaspoon (60% solution) sodium lactate
.15 oz. eucalyptus essential oil
turquoise mica, to suit

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites. I also found that using pine tar soap to bathe my dog calmed and soothed his flea dermatitis.

Instructions:

Follow the same directions as with the previous pine tar soap recipe mixing the lye-water and oils at around 80°F. My 12 oz. recipe yields four bars of pine tar soap and will fill four of the Ozera 6-Cavity Silicone Soap Mold with a bit to spare.

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites. I also found that using pine tar soap to bathe my dog calmed and soothed his flea dermatitis.

Once your soap reaches trace, pour it evenly into four of the mold cavities leaving a little room at the top if you want a colored top. Mix the mica to suit into the remaining soap batter, then fill the molds the rest of the way with the colored soap batter.

Unmold after 24 to 48 hours. Your soap is ready for use in four to six weeks.

I went a little heavy on the mica just to test the result I’d get. It did make the lather green, but it didn’t stain my skin or the tub. (This is also the version I used on my dog, Jasper, that calmed his skin. Neem oil soap also works well for this.)

Learn how to make homemade pine tar soap with this simple pine tar soap recipe. Traditionally, pine tar soap is used to treat problematic skin conditions that include psoriasis, eczema, dandruff and skin inflammation. It can also be used to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac and it helps to relieve itching caused by bug bites.

If you’re still not ready to make your own pine tar soap, you can buy it online here from The Village Soapsmith as well as from many other talented soapmakers on Etsy. For more handmade soaps and other bath and body products you can buy, be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking board as well my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Ultimate Detox Salt Bar Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This ultimate detox salt bar recipe combines pink Himalayan salt with coconut derived activated charcoal for the ultimate detox salt bath! Superfatted at 20%, this detox salt bar recipe also contains coconut oil, castor oil, safflower oil and mango butter for lather and conditioning.

This ultimate detox salt bar recipe combines pink Himalayan salt with coconut derived activated charcoal for the ultimate detox salt bath! Superfatted at 20%, this detox salt bar recipe also contains coconut, castor, and safflower oils as well as mango butter for their lather and conditioning properties.

This ultimate detox salt bar recipe combines pink Himalayan salt with coconut derived activated charcoal for the ultimate detox salt bath! Superfatted at 20%, this detox salt bar recipe also contains coconut oil, castor oil, safflower oil and mango butter for lather and conditioning.

Ultimate Detox Salt Bar Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

12.8 oz. refined coconut oil
1.6 oz. mango butter
.8 oz. castor oil
.8 oz. safflower oil

5.6 oz. distilled water
2.2 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

8 oz. pink Himalayan salt, finely ground
.5 oz. activated charcoal powder
1 oz. fragrance oil or .5 oz. essential oil, if desired

Soap Notes:

This salt bar recipe follows the rule of 50% salt, 80% coconut oil, 10% butter and 10% (liquid at room temperature) oil. I chose to use finely ground pink Himalayan salt in lieu of sea salt for it’s higher mineral content. Castor oil was used at 5% to boost the bubbles, and safflower and mango butter were used for their skin conditioning and moisturizing properties in addition to the 20% superfat. (The higher superfat counteracts the cleansing effect of the coconut oil so it doesn’t over dry skin and it helps the soap to lather well in the presence of so much salt.)

The activated charcoal, should you desire to re-size my detox salt bar recipe, was used at 3.125% of the total oil weight. I specifically used the coconut activated charcoal powder from Rocky Mountain Essentials for this salt bar recipe. However, they also offer hardwood activated charcoal powder that you may also use based on your preference.

This ultimate detox salt bar recipe combines pink Himalayan salt with coconut derived activated charcoal for the ultimate detox salt bath! Superfatted at 20%, this detox salt bar recipe also contains coconut oil, castor oil, safflower oil and mango butter for lather and conditioning.

This ultimate detox salt bar recipe combines pink Himalayan salt with coconut derived activated charcoal for the ultimate detox salt bath! Superfatted at 20%, this detox salt bar recipe also contains coconut, castor, and safflower oils as well as mango butter for their lather and conditioning properties.

In addition, because salt creates such a hard bar, I discounted my water to 35% rather than 33% which is what I typically use. This will make you soap easier to cut once unmolded if you are using a loaf mold. For silicone molds – I used a combination of Wilton’s 6-Cavity Silicone Heart Mold and Crafter’s Choice Basic Guest Round Silicone Soap Mold – wait an extra day or two to unmold to ensure the soaps come cleanly out of the mold especially if your detox salt bar soaps do not gel. (My ultimate detox salt bar recipe yielded six heart shaped soaps and four mini round guest soaps.)

Following is a screenshot from SoapCalc’s lye calculator which I used to determine the amount of lye and water needed for my ultimate detox salt bar recipe. (To learn how to use a lye calculator to create your own custom cold process soap recipes, visit this blog post.)

Ultimate Detox Salt Bar Recipe - Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog!

Instructions:

You will need to follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions found here to create your own ultimate detox salt bars.  (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, using a digital scale weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved completely. Set aside to cool.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking oils and butters using a digital scale. Combine in a stainless steel pot then heat over medium heat on the stove until all the oils and butters have melted. Once melted, remove the soapmaking oils and butters from heat and set aside.

You can mix the lye/water and soapmaking oils at any point in which your lye solution and soapmaking oils have cooled to around 95°F. I chose to add my salt and activated charcoal to my soapmaking oils before I added the lye/water to ensure it was evenly distributed, along with the fragrance oil as this is such a small batch. Alternately you may also add them at a light trace. Simply weigh out the charcoal powder and salt and use a stick blender to mix them into the soapmaking oils. Now pour in the lye/water and mix until you reach trace.

Once your soap has traced, pour the soap batter into your prepared mold. (If you’re using a wooden loaf mold you will need to line it.) Once poured, cover the soap to insulate. I used silicon molds so I covered the tops of them with foodservice film.  (For a wooden loaf mold, you can cover the mold with a piece of cardboard cut to fit.)

This ultimate detox salt bar recipe combines pink Himalayan salt with coconut derived activated charcoal for the ultimate detox salt bath! Superfatted at 20%, this detox salt bar recipe also contains coconut oil, castor oil, safflower oil and mango butter for lather and conditioning.

After 24 – 48 hours have passed, you can unmold your detox salt bar soaps. Set your soaps aside in a cool, dry location to cure for 4 – 6 weeks prior to use.

For even more of my homemade soap recipes as well as my bath and beauty DIY’s and other favorites from across the web, be sure to follow my boards on Pinterest. You can also find and follow me on Blog Lovin’, Tumblr, Facebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Must Have Festival Accessories & Summer Festival DIY’s

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



These must have festival accessories and summer festival DIY's are sure to make your festival experience this year even better!

These must have festival accessories and summer festival DIY’s are sure to make your festival experience this year even better!

Keep reading to discover not only a collection of my favorite must have festival accessories and clothing but also a collection of my very own summer festival DIY’s for making your own homemade festival soap, insect repellent and dry shampoo!

Must Have Festival Accessories & Clothing

Discover not only a wonderful collection of favorite must have festival accessories and clothing but also a collection of summer festival DIY's for making your own homemade festival soap, insect repellent and dry shampoo!

Made to Your Hiking Bottle Tote in Floral Tapestry / Cactus What You Preach Battery Pack in Geo / Good News Travels Vast Backpack / Boldly Buckled Belt in Cognac

Discover not only a wonderful collection of favorite must have festival accessories and clothing but also a collection of summer festival DIY's for making your own homemade festival soap, insect repellent and dry shampoo!

Creatively Connected Picnic Blanket in Geometric / Floral of the Story Flower Crown / Braid for Walkin’ Sandal in Cognac / Daisy, I Love Your Way Shorts

Discover not only a wonderful collection of favorite must have festival accessories and clothing but also a collection of summer festival DIY's for making your own homemade festival soap, insect repellent and dry shampoo!

On Cloud Divine Top / Fun-Woman Band Romper / Put Your Mind at Peace Top / May the Vest Fan Win

Discover not only a wonderful collection of favorite must have festival accessories and clothing but also a collection of summer festival DIY's for making your own homemade festival soap, insect repellent and dry shampoo!

Hands-Free to Be Me Belt Bag / Birkenstock Strappy Camper Sandal in Taupe Suede / Banjo Schmo Hat / Now Boarding Zone Fun Belt Bag

These must have festival accessories and summer festival DIY's are sure to make your festival experience this year even better!

Summer Festival DIY’s

These summer festival DIY’s are perfect for helping to maintain your comfort insect free while you’re enjoying time outdoors!

This natural summer festival soap recipe contains a blend of natural essential oils to help keep biting summer insects away!

Summer Festival Soap Recipe

This natural summer festival soap recipe contains a blend of natural essential oils to help keep biting summer insects away!

Ingredients (x2):

5.4 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
9 oz. palm oil
9 oz. rice bran oil
3.6 oz. soybean oil
1.8 oz. grapeseed oil
3.6 oz. shea butter
3.6 oz. cocoa butter

12 fluid oz. distilled water
4.8 oz. lye (sodium hydroxide)

At trace Batch A:

.85 oz. lavender essential oil
.15 oz. lemon eucalyptus essential oil
.05 oz. tea tree oil
.05 oz. lavender flowers
lavender ultramarine pigment or mica powder, to suit

At trace Batch B:

1 oz. lemongrass essential oil
.15 oz. peppermint essential oil

Directions:

You’ll need to make two batches of soap in separate pots for this summer festival soap recipe. The final festival soap recipe will fill two of my wooden soapmaking molds. Combine equal amounts of all soapmaking oils into each pot and prepare two containers of lye-water. (Each pot should have 5.4 oz. coconut oil, 9 oz. palm oil, 9 oz. rice bran oil, 3.6 oz. soybean oil, 1.8 oz. grape seed oil, 3.6 oz. shea butter and 3.6 oz. cocoa butter. Then each container of lye-water should contain 12 oz. distilled water and 4.8 oz. of lye.) Prepare according to your basic cold process soapmaking instructions.

Once each container of lye-water and oils have cooled, you are ready to mix your soap. Start by mixing one container of lye-water into one pot of soapmaking oils. At a light trace, weigh out and stir in the ingredients listed for Batch A – the lavender, eucalyptus and tea tree essential oils, lavender flowers and the pigment powder. Mix well using your immersion blender. Once it reaches a thick trace pour the soap evenly into the bottom of BOTH of your lined molds.

Now mix your second batch of soapmaking oils and lye-water together, weighing and adding the ingredients for Batch B – the lemongrass and peppermint essential oils – at trace. As lemongrass essential oil turns the soap a lovely shade of yellow, you won’t need to use a colorant for this layer. Once ready, pour the soap from this batch evenly into the two soap molds over top of the lavender fragrance/colored soap. Cover and insulate for 24 hours, then unmold and cut your festival soap into bars. Allow to cure for a minimum of three weeks before use.

This recipe will yield 20-24 bars depending on how you cut them.

Best Ever Natural Homemade Dry Shampoo Recipe

Summer Festival Dry Shampoo Recipe

My summer festival dry shampoo recipe avoids using food ingredients that may attract insects and in lieu of cornmeal instead uses a super effective and light blend of arrowroot powder, rice flour, baking soda, colloidal oatmeal and cosmetic clays. Essential oils and herbs are also added for a fresh fragrance as well as for their insect repellent properties.

Ingredients:

3 Tablespoons Bob’s Red Mill Rice Flour White
1 Tablespoon baking soda
2 Tablespoons colloidal oatmeal
3 Tablespoons arrowroot powder
1 Tablespoon Rhassoul (Red Moroccan) Clay
1 Tablespoon lavender blossoms or (lavender flower powder)
1 ml lavender essential oil
1/2 ml patchouli essential oil
1/2 ml rosemary extract

Instructions:

Because I tend to have red highlights in my hair I chose to use red Moroccan clay in this recipe. If you prefer you can substitute with Fuller’s earth clay. You can also sub the arrowroot powder with Bob’s Red Mill Tapioca Flour. (Although Bob’s Red Mill makes an all natural arrowroot starch/flour as well.) For darker hair you can also add 1/8 – 1/4 of a teaspoon of brown iron oxide.

Using a Tablespoon measuring spoon, measure out the rice flour, baking soda, colloidal oatmeal, arrowroot powder, clay and lavender flowers in a glass measuring cup. Then, using a different graduated plastic transfer pipette for each of the essential oils and rosemary extract, measure out and add these to the dry ingredients. Mix with a spoon, then slowly pour into a coffee bean grinder and mix well. This will turn your lavender blossoms into a powder and evenly distribute the essential oils and extract. Once mixed, simply pour into two 4 oz. or one 8 oz. jar or container.

To use simply apply to hair – a makeup brush actually works wonderfully for this and cuts down on spillage – and lightly massage into hair with your hands. (If you used brown iron oxide pigment, avoid your scalp area as it can stain your scalp.) Then brush through and go! I found this recipe works really well, smells heavenly, and it even added some nice volume to my fine, straight hair.

This natural insect repellent spray recipe really works and is perfect for every outdoor enthusiast! Use this insect repellent spray to deter biting insects when camping, hiking, biking and gardening this summer!

Summer Festival Insect Repellent Spray

This natural insect repellent spray recipe really works and is perfect for every outdoor enthusiast! Use this insect repellent spray to deter biting insects at summer festivals and during other outdoor activities! Simply mist this spray on your skin after showering and as needed throughout the day.

Adapted from The Mountain Rose Herbs Blog

Ingredients:

2 oz. witch hazel extract
2 oz. catnip or peppermint hydrosol
2 oz. distilled water
1 mL (20 drops) lemon eucalyptus essential oil
1 mL (20 drops) lavender essential oil
1/2 mL (10 drops) lemongrass essential oil
1/2 mL (10 drops) Virginia cedarwood essential oil

Instructions:

To make this natural insect repellent spray recipe you’ll need to begin by using a digital scale to weigh out the witch hazel, catnip hydrosol and distilled water. Combine into a 6 – 8 oz. spray bottle using a funnel. (I used this Boston round bottle with mini spray trigger from SKS Bottle & Packaging.) Using a graduated transfer pipette or dropper, add the essential oils to the bottle then screw on the trigger sprayer. Shake well to combine the ingredients and again before each use.

To extend the shelf life of this natural insect repellent spray and to help you and your loved ones cool down on a hot summer day, store this in the refrigerator between uses. And don’t forget to pack it for your next hiking or camping trip!

In addition to these summer festival DIY’s you may also be interested in my nine natural foot care recipes to keep your feet looking great all summer long. (Find them here.) And you may also want to try my natural deodorizing foot powder recipe for stinky sweat or rain soaked shoes. (Find that recipe here.)

For more of my natural summer bath and body recipes, be sure to visit and follow my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest. In addition you can also find me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook,TwitterG+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Pink Salt and Sal Butter Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains a high percentage of skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt that promotes healing aids in detoxing and nourishing skin.

This homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains a high percentage of skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt that promotes healing and aids in detoxing and nourishing skin.

As people with latex allergies and sensitivities are often also allergic to shea butter, I wanted to create an alternative to a homemade shea butter soap. Sal butter, like shea butter, is a superb moisturizer and is believed to help with various skin disorders such as acne, eczema and psoriasis. It can also help to reduce skin inflammation.

Sal butter makes up 11.11% of this sal butter soap recipe. Coconut oil was used at 30.56%. I used a higher percentage of sal butter and a 10% superfat in my homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe to counteract both the higher percentage of coconut oil used (for lather) as well as to add moisturizing properties to the soap. The pink Himalayan salt, used at 22.22% of this soap recipe, aids skin in eliminating toxins, balancing the body’s pH, and increasing circulation.

In addition, my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe is palm free. (Learn more about the use of palm oil in soapmaking and discover more of my palm free homemade soap recipes here.)

This pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt to detox, promote healing and nourish skin.

Pink Salt and Sal Butter Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

2 oz. sal butter
4.5 oz. safflower oil
5.5 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
1 oz. castor oil
5 oz. olive oil

5.9 oz. distilled water
2.4 oz. lye (sodium hydroxide)

1 oz. fragrance oil, of choice
4 oz. pink Himalayan salt

This pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt to detox, promote healing and nourish skin.

Instructions:

My pink salt and sal butter soap recipe is half the size of my usual homemade soap recipes. I used this 6-cavity silicone soap mold for this recipe. This soap recipe will require two of these silicone molds and will yield approximately seven bars of soap. If you prefer to use the DIY wooden loaf soap mold I typically use for my recipes, simply double the recipe’s ingredients and run it back through a lye calculator. (Amounts and percentages are pictured above in my screenshot from SoapCalc so you can re-size this soap recipe as needed.) Should you choose not to include salt when you make this soap, then you will likely want to either reduce the % of water used in the recipe to about 30% and/or add .25 oz. of sodium lactate to the recipe for a harder bar.

You will need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking method instructions when making this homemade soap. This soapmaking tutorial also contains information on how to resize a soap recipe as well as how to determine the amount of soap needed for your mold. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe to get you started.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the soapmaking oils and sal butter using your digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until all the oils have melted, then remove from heat and set aside to cool.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to 90°F to 100°F you’re ready to make soap. (If you’re using a fragrance oil known to accelerate trace, then you will want to soap at a cooler temperature.)

Slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach a light trace, then weigh out and add the pink Himalayan salt and fragrance oil. (I used a lemon verbena fragrance oil for my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe since it’s so spring-y!) Use the stick blender to thoroughly combine the new additions with your soap batter and continue mixing until the soap reaches a medium to full trace. Now pour your soap into your mold(s) or mold cavities.

If you want your soap to gel, cover and insulate your soap. (I mixed my soap at cooler temps and lightly covered my soap mold with plastic wrap. My soap did not gel.)

Wait 24 hours, then unmold your soap. If your soap did not gel or is still soft, you may need to wait 2-3 days to cleanly unmold your soap from the silicone mold(s). Or, you can freeze your soap to remove it from the mold early if needed. Your soap should harden up in a few days.

If you used a loaf mold, you can now cut your soap into bars. If you used the 6-cavity silicone soap molds, your soap bars only need to cure as no cutting is needed unless you want to make smaller guest sized soaps.

Allow your soaps to cure 4-6 weeks before use. Then package and label as desired. If you are planning to sell your pink salt and sal butter soaps, be sure to include the weight of your soaps on each bar and avoid making any medical claims about your soaps to meet FDA guidelines.

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

If you like my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe, then you may also like my luxury double butter soap recipe. My luxury double butter soap recipe contains high percentages of both cocoa and shea butters making it perfect for anyone who suffers from dry skin. The recipe comes in both palm and palm free versions. You can find both of my luxury double butter soap recipes here.

Want to learn how to create your own custom cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator? See my tutorial on creating cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking and DIY Bath and Body boards on Pinterest. Or keep up with all of my new homemade soap, bath and beauty recipes by following me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Reader Submission: Shea Butter and Witch Hazel Soap

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



I LOVE these homemade soap photographs sent in by Marilyn, one of much appreciated and amazing blog readers. Marilyn created the homemade soap pictured using my Homemade Shea Butter & Witch Hazel Soap Recipe. Aren't they just beautiful? They remind me of Van Gogh's Starry Night.

I LOVE these homemade soap photographs sent in by Marilyn, one of much appreciated and amazing blog readers. Marilyn created the homemade soap pictured using my Homemade Shea Butter & Witch Hazel Soap Recipe. Aren’t they just beautiful? They remind me of Van Gogh’s Starry Night.

Following are Marilyn’s comments on my shea butter & witch hazel soap recipe.

“Oh my, I’m so impatient. I couldn’t wait to check the soap qualities. What a luxurious stable lather! …I haven’t soaped with Witch Hazel, or sesame oil before. Wow, this Is a keeper, for sure. I’ve made other recipes with a similar fatty acid profile but what makes this so incredibly luxurious? Do you think it’s really the witch hazel? Or the high percentage of Shea butter? Or I’ve never soaped with sesame oil?  Would love to try the exact same recipe without the witch hazel, because if that’s the secret, then mountain rose has something pretty special.”

To answer her question I feel like it’s simply a combination of the ingredients chosen that made this one a keeper, even if it’s a bit tough to make. But the witch hazel does add a unique feel I haven’t ever quite achieved with other homemade soap recipes. The witch hazel that both Marilyn and I used for this particular homemade soap recipe can be found at Mountain Rose Herbs here. Or learn how to make your own homemade shea butter and witch hazel soap now with homemade recipe here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, including my new favorite luxury double butter soap recipe, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking board on Pinterest. Or, if you’re interested in making palm free cold process soap, you can find my collection of palm free cold process soap recipes here. And, if you’re a first timer, you can learn how to make cold process soap from scratch here.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.