DIY Bath and Body Valentine’s Gifts with StickerYou!

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



(Disclosure: This post has been sponsored by StickerYou.)

Learn how to make beautiful DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with custom labels from StickerYou and three bath and body recipes perfect for gifting.

Learn how to make beautiful DIY bath and body Valentine’s gifts with custom labels from StickerYou!

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. And, if you’re like me, you can always use a little help with your homemade gifts. While I make and gift a lot of bath and body gifts, labeling those gifts can sometimes be a challenge. After all, products we store and use in the bathroom are subject to coming into contact with water and high humidity which can leave labels a smeared mess. StickerYou solved that problem for me without having to  spend a lot of money and without investing a lot of time designing my labels.

Learn how to make beautiful DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with custom labels from StickerYou and three bath and body recipes perfect for gifting.

StickerYou sent me some amazing vinyl labels to use for my DIY bath and body Valentine’s gifts. They not only look great, but work beautifully for bath and body applications. Even better, their stickers and labels can be customized in any size, shape or quantity you want using your own artwork or licensed clipart. Or just pick some of theirs!

I love the ease of StickerYou’s pre-designed templates for creating custom labels. (There’s even a label template for lip balm tubes – a product I have always struggled with creating labels for.) Or you can enter custom dimensions for your own container choice.

Learn how to make this natural rose bath salts recipe plus two more amazing DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with a little help from StickerYou!

In addition to the ease of creating your own designs on StickerYou, you’ll also find that there are no additional charges for die-cut stickers, bleeds, or cut-outs! Their customer service is both helpful and friendly and their pricing starts as low as $10. Plus every order comes with a 100% satisfaction guarantee. So whether you’re simply wanting to create gifts for friends and family, or if you’re a business needing product labels or promotional items, StickerYou is simply perfect!

Ready to make some awesome DIY bath and body Valentine’s gifts? Keep reading for three easy bath and body recipes that you can gift this Valentine’s Day!

Learn how to make this natural rose bath salts recipe plus two more amazing DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with a little help from StickerYou!

Rose Bath Salts Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

9 oz. Epsom salt
3.3 oz. pink Himalayan salt
.15 oz. safflower oil
.25 oz. organic dried rose petals
.35 oz. rose fragrance oil, optional

Instructions:

If you prefer to keep this rose bath salts recipe natural, you can substitute the fragrance oil with .05 oz. (3% dilution) rose damascena absolute or .1 oz. essential oil of your choice! In addition, if you’d like to keep the oils from floating on the surface of the bath water when used, you can also add .05% Polysorbate 80 to this recipe.

To create these rose bath salts, simply using a digital scale to weigh out all the ingredients. Mix your dry ingredients together first. Then weigh out the safflower oil and fragrance oil into a separate container (along with the Polysorbate 80 if desired) then combine the two. Mix until all of the ingredients are evenly distributed then spoon evenly into three 4 oz. spice jars. (You may need to tap the jars down to fit all of the bath salts into your containers.)

Apply your own custom labels from StickerYou for that finishing touch and your rose bath salts are ready for gifting! These also make lovely Mother’s Day gifts and wedding favors!

Learn how to make this natural rose soap recipe plus two more amazing DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with a little help from StickerYou!

Melt & Pour Rose Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

29.5 oz. white natural melt and pour soap base
.9 oz. rose fragrance oil
rose kaolin clay, to suit

Instructions:

To keep this melt and pour rose soap recipe natural, you can substitute the rose fragrance oil with .15 oz. of (3% dilution) rose damascena absolute or .3 oz. of an essential oil of your choice.

Weigh out the soap base and cut into chunks. Heat in a double boiler or in the microwave in 30 second increments until melted.

Add either a red liquid soap colorant or a small amount of rose kaolin clay until you achieve the shade of pink you’d like for your soap. Mix well.

Pour the soap into all six cavities of the Crafter’s Choice basic round silicone soap mold.

Spritz the top of the soaps with isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to remove any air bubbles and allow to harden completely.

Unmold, then wrap in foodservice film and label.

Learn how to make this DIY embedded heart soap plus two more amazing DIY bath and body Valentine's gifts with a little help from StickerYou!

Embedded Heart Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

21.9 oz. clear natural melt and pour soap base
8.4 oz. white natural melt and pour soap base
.9 oz. rose fragrance oil
Crafter’s Choice crimson sparkle color bar, to suit

Instructions:

You’ll begin by making your heart embeds for this soap for which you’ll need a Wilton 6-cavity heart silicone mold.

Weigh out the clear melt and pour soap base. Cut into chunks then melt in a double boiler or in the microwave in 30 second increments. Cut off a chunk of the crimson sparkle color bar and stir into the melted base until it’s melted completely. Continue until you reach desired color. Alternately, you can also use a liquid red soap colorant.

Weigh out . 65 oz. of fragrance oil (or . 2 oz. of essential oil) and stir into the melted soap.

Pour the melted soap into all six cavities of your heart mold. Spritz the top of the soaps with isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to remove any air bubbles and allow to harden completely.

Once the heart soaps have hardened, carefully remove them from the mold.

Place a heart with the smooth side (top) down into each of the six cavities of the Crafter’s Choice basic round silicone soap mold and press firmly against the bottom of the mold.

Now weigh out 8.4 oz. of the white melt and pour soap base. Cut into chunks then melt in a double boiler or in the microwave in 30 second increments just until fully melted.

Weigh out .25 oz. of fragrance oil (or .05 oz. essential oil) and stir into the melted white soap base.

Now carefully pour the white soap base around the heart embeds in each of the mold cavities. Spritz the top of the soaps with isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to remove any air bubbles and allow to harden completely.

Once your soaps have set up, carefully remove them from the mold and wrap and label as desired.

For more DIY bath and body Valentine’s gifts visit both my DIY Bath and Body board and my DIY Valentine’s Day Gifts board on Pinterest. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Palm Free Olive and Babassu Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin!

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it’s simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

My boyfriend, James, recently wanted me to teach him to make soap. Let me begin by saying, I’m kind of a crappy teacher. The whole “instructing” thing makes me nervous which in turn makes me impatient and, as such, I come off a wee bit snippy. This is one of the primary reasons I “teach” via my blog. My friends, however, understand my quirks so it’s different with them. However, we are also kind of bad in that we let the wine flow freely while we’re crafting. So, well, um. That’s why I’m always smiling in those photos that may or may not be on instagram. Ha ha.

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

James is wonderful, and super crazy smart, so I was able to rush through all of the explanations on the chemistry of this soap and not feel like a jerk. When we got to the part where he asked when he could actually USE the soap, however, is where things fell apart. He was rather miffed he had to wait four weeks. I told him that in the meantime he could just make me cookies. Luckily he stays super busy like me. Otherwise I’d have a constant soapmaking companion encouraging me to rush unmolding my soap loaves.

Anyhow, if you’ve never ever made cold process soap before, then you should first check out my tutorial on how to make cold process soap from scratch. You may even want to watch a few YouTube videos to give you a feel for the process, but it’s not necessary. Once you’re ready, here’s the recipe!

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Palm Free Olive and Babassu Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

2.4 oz. babassu oil
12.8 oz. olive oil
.8 oz. castor oil

4.8 oz. distilled water
2.1 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 teaspoon (60% solution) sodium lactate
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8th teaspoon ultramarine blue pigment powder, optional
1 oz. Sea Salt & Driftwood fragrance oil, optional

Soap Notes:

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin.

For starters, or rather, here are some changes I would make a second time around… If you don’t let this soap recipe gel, it’s going to be soft for a bit and will take several days to unmold. I’d definitely either increase the sodium lactate to 1 Tablespoon and/or reduce the water as percent of the oil weight to 28%.

In addition, I have noted on the screenshot I took of my olive and babassu soap recipe (on SoapCalc) to use 1/4 teaspoon of pigment powder. I ended up using less as reflected in my recipe above. This gave my soap a nice baby blue color that I felt went will with the fragrance oil I chose.

The Sea Salt & Driftwood fragrance oil is a nice scent. James and I feel like it’s pretty unisex and it didn’t make me sneeze.

However, both the fragrance and the pigment powder are optional. The sugar is to help boost the bubbles a bit but you can omit it if you like.

You shouldn’t have any surprises with my olive and babassu soap recipe as indicated or with this specific fragrance oil even if you’re a beginner.

And then there’s the coarse sea salt on top…

This natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe is made using Australian black clay and fine sea salt for a luxurious spa like experience in the shower!

As my fragrance oil and color theme was kind of ocean-y, I figured I’d decorate the top with sea salt. I’ve done this many times in the past with cold process loaf soaps. For example, my natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe (pictured above.) However, it didn’t work so well for the type of mold I used this time and I had to get creative in the end. So you can either, a) omit the coarse sea salt on top for smooth, even bars or b) take your soap to art class. (I’ll tell you what I did to mine further down.)

I used this Ozera 6-Cavity Silicone Soap Mold for my olive and babassu soap recipe.

Instructions:

Taking all safety precautions you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking method to create my olive and babassu soap recipe.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water into a heat safe container.

Then, using a digital scale, weigh out the amount of lye needed.

Stir until the lye has dissolved completely, then set aside to cool.

Next, use your digital scale to weigh out the babassu, castor and olive oils. Heat in a non-aluminum pot over medium to medium-low heat on the stove until your ingredients have melted completely.

Once your ingredients have melted, remove from heat and set aside.

Allow the lye-water and your soapmaking oils to cool to between 90°F-100°F.

Once your ingredients have cooled, use a measuring spoon to measure out the sodium lactate as well as the sugar then stir into your lye water.

If you are using a pigment powder to color your soap, measure out the pigment and stir into the melted oils with a stick blender.

Now pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils and mix until you reach a light trace. Add your fragrance oil at this point if you have chosen to scent your soap and mix again.

Once your soap traces again, pour the soap batter into all six of the rectangle cavities of your silicone soap mold. (If you think you’ll need to move your soap, be sure to place the mold on a cutting board before you pour your soap for easy transfer.)

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Set your soap aside to complete the saponification process. You can check the soap 24-48 hours later to see if it’s ready to be unmolded. If it’s not, simply wait another day or two. There’s no rush. I mean, because James will tell you, you have to wait FOUR WEEKS too use it anyway and apparently that’s just INSANE. Ha!

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Once you’ve unmolded your soaps, set them aside in a cool, dry location to finish curing four to six weeks.

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Now, if you did a crazy experiment on the tops of your soap bars, it’s highly likely it can be fixed. My coarse salt on the tops of my bars kept falling off. And if I took the salt, off the soap just looked bizarre. So I improvised.

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

I simply sprinkled fine cosmetic glitter on top of my soap bars where the salt was. I then scented and tinted clear natural melt and pour soap base and drizzled over the tops of my bars, covering the salt. Not only does the salt now dissolve as you use the soap, but it kind of looks neat. Plus there’s no right or wrong way to do it. After all, they are YOUR art bars!

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

Plus I screwed up way less on this soaping gaffe than I did when I made my tea tree and sea mud soap recipe. You won’t believe how horrendous this soap looked before the fix. (You can check out the before and after transformation here.)

If you liked my palm free olive and babassu soap recipe then be sure to check out my other cold process soap recipes here. In addition you can also find more of my homemade soap recipes on my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board as well my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board.

Not ready to make my olive and babassu soap recipe? Try a homemade babassu soap sample set from Elegant Rose Boutique on Etsy! Her babassu soaps are made using only babassu, castor, apricot kernel and jojoba oils. As they don’t contain any coconut, palm or olive oil, they are great for those with sensitivities. For more of my favorites on Etsy, check out my Etsy collections here.

Simple Natural Soapmaking by Jan Berry includes recipes for Blue Agave Soap, Wild Rosehips Soap, Double Mint Sage Soap and Dead Sea Mud Spa Bar. The recipes are in tune with today’s trends―such as vegan options, shampoo and shaving bars, seasonal soaps such as Pumpkin Spice Soap and soaps highlighting popular ingredients such as goat’s milk and sea salt―while still retaining a rustic, old-fashioned feel.

Also be sure to keep your eyes peeled for a new soapmaking book by Jan Berry in August! Jan, a fellow blogger, is the author of The Nerdy Farm Wife blog, as well as the book, 101 Easy Homemade Products for Your Skin, Health & Home. Her new book, Simple Natural Soapmaking, will be released August 8th, and is available for pre-order now.

Sample recipes include Blue Agave Soap, Wild Rosehips Soap, Double Mint Sage Soap and Dead Sea Mud Spa Bar. The recipes are in tune with today’s trends―such as vegan options, shampoo and shaving bars, seasonal soaps such as Pumpkin Spice Soap and soaps highlighting popular ingredients such as goat’s milk and sea salt―while still retaining a rustic, old-fashioned feel.

And don’t forget to find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. You can sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Tinted Lip Balm Recipes Three Ways

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



Learn how to make these tinted lip balm recipes three different ways! Combine them in a tri-cosmetic container or package them individually in pots, tins or tubes!

Learn how to make these tinted lip balm recipes three different ways! Combine them in a tri-cosmetic container or package them individually in pots, tins or tubes! Not only do these make great lip balms, but you can play with the color intensity and also use them as face highlighters and eyeshadow bases.

Craft night with friends! Learn how to make the same tinted lip balm recipes that we created for our craft night!

These tinted lip balms were a collaborative during a craft night with two of my very wonderful friends, Bambi (left) and Cathy (right.) Each are also talented in their own right. Bambi creates really cool beaded jewelry for her Etsy shop, Happy Tree Frog Studios, while Cathy cuts and colors fabulous looking hair and does some amazingly marvelous makeup. I’m hoping to have Cathy join me at some point this year making a video tutorial for using cosmetic recipes I create. Fingers crossed for that.

This lip plumping lip balm recipe gives lips a zing of clove essential oil to help plump lips with the added bonus of copper shimmery tint!

We actually created FOUR fantastic tinted lip balm recipes on this particular occasion but I already blogged our tinted lip plumping lip balm recipe. This particular tinted lip balm contains clove essential oil for a zing to help plump lips. Plus it’s tinted with a beautiful copper shimmery tint! You can learn how to make this tinted lip balm recipe here. Then mix and match your tri-color lip balm pots with colors to your hearts content!

Check out three fantastic tinted lip balm recipes you can make yourself including this tinted lip balm recipe for a passionately pink tinted lip balm!

This passionately pink tinted lip balm is made with an oil locking mica shimmer powder. This reflective red powder produces red, orange or soft light oranges in cosmetics depending on the recipe and application. (Keep reading for the recipe below!)

Check out three fantastic tinted lip balm recipes you can make yourself including this tinted lip balm recipe for a Smurf inspired blue tinted lip balm!

This frosty blue tinted lip balm reminded us of our childhood – watching Smurf cartoons!

Check out three fantastic tinted lip balm recipes you can make yourself including this tinted lip balm recipe for this frosty tinted lip balm that reminds me of toasted marshmallows!

And then there was this frosty tinted lip balm that reminded me of toasted marshmallows. (This one is SUPER frosty. For less frost and more tint, reduce the amount of Diamond Dust mica to a teaspoon or less.)

Following are all three of these tinted lip balm recipes.

Check out three fantastic tinted lip balm recipes you can make yourself including this tinted lip balm recipe for a passionately pink tinted lip balm!

Passionately Pink Tinted Lip Balm Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

1 oz. sweet almond oil
.5 oz. refined shea butter
.5 oz. refined cocoa butter
.25 oz. white cosmetic beeswax
4 mL pink lemonade flavor oil
1 Tablespoon red orange oil locking mica shimmer (or similar)

Instructions:

See below.

Check out three fantastic tinted lip balm recipes you can make yourself!

Frosted Teal Tinted Lip Balm Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

1 oz. refined cocoa butter
.5 oz. refined shea butter
.1 oz. walnut oil
.2 oz. white cosmetic beeswax
1.5 mL lime peel essential oil
2 teaspoons tropical teal mica powder (or similar)
1 Tablespoon Diamond Dust mica (or similar)

Instructions:

See below.

Check out three fantastic tinted lip balm recipes you can make yourself including this tinted lip balm recipe for this frosty tinted lip balm that reminds me of toasted marshmallows!

Frosty Toasted Marshmallow Tinted Lip Balm Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

.3 oz white cosmetic beeswax
.3 oz. dark cocoa butter wafers
.25 oz. refined coconut oil
.15 oz. sweet almond oil
3 mL chocolate mint flavor oil
1 Tablespoon bronze brown mica (or similar)
1 Tablespoon Diamond Dust mica (or similar)

Instructions:

To make these tinted lip balm recipes you’ll need a digital scale to weigh out ingredients as well as your choice of lip balm pots, tubes or tins along with a graduated plastic transfer pipette to measure out the essential oil and flavor oils. You’ll also need measuring spoons for the mica.

For each lip balm recipe, separately weigh out the beeswax and butters and combine in a double boiler. Heat until melted. Then weigh out the carrier oils and stir into the melted beeswax and butter blend. Remove from heat. (I suggest making these one at a time and not trying to do them all at once. You might drive yourself crazy otherwise.)

Using a graduated plastic transfer pipette, measure out the essential oil or flavor oil you are using  and stir into the melted wax, butter and oils.

Then, using measuring spoons, measure out the micas and whisk into the melted lip balm base.

Allow the melted lip balm to cool slightly, then mix again.

Pour your tinted lip balms into your containers of choice, one at a time, remixing the base after each pour, then set aside to cool.

Once your lip balms have fully set up you can seal the containers.

If you’re creating these tinted lip balm recipes to sell you’ll need to be sure to label your lip balms so that they meet state and federal laws. If you’re unsure about the rules and regulations regarding labeling cosmetics, I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

If you like my tinted balm recipes then you may also like my other lip balm recipes. You can find them all here. Of for more lip balm, homemade soap and other bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to follow my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest.

For more from Soap Deli News blog you can find and follow me on PinterestG+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Tinted Lip Plumping Lip Balm Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This lip plumping lip balm recipe gives lips a zing with clove essential oil to help plump lips with the added bonus of copper shimmery tint!

This tinted lip plumping lip balm recipe gives lips a zing with clove essential oil to help plump lips with the added bonus of a beautiful copper shimmery tint! You’ll love this lip balm for everyday not just special occasions. And, because it contains lanolin, it’s perfect for dry or chapped lips!

This lip plumping lip balm recipe gives lips a zing with clove essential oil to help plump lips with the added bonus of copper shimmery tint!

Tinted Lip Plumping Lip Balm Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

.7 oz. sweet almond oil
.3 oz. castor oil
.2 oz. refined shea butter
.6 oz. white cosmetic beeswax
.1 oz. lanolin
1.5 mL clove bud essential oil
1 Tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon Copper Penny Mica Powder (or lip safe bronze mica)

 Instructions:

To make this tinted lip plumping lip balm recipe you’ll need a digital scale to weigh out ingredients as well as your choice of lip balm pots, tubes or tins along with a graduated plastic transfer pipette to measure out the essential oil and measuring spoons for the mica. For this project I used 1/4 oz. clear glass thick wall jars with lined black dome lids from Container & Packaging Supply.

Weigh out the beeswax and shea butter into a double boiler. Heat until melted. Then weigh out the lanolin and stir into the melted wax and butter until melted. Do the same with the sweet almond and castor oil, then remove from heat.

Using a graduated plastic transfer pipette, measure out the clove bud essential oil and stir into the melted wax, butter and oils.

Then, using measuring spoons, measure out the mica and whisk into the melted lip balm base.

Allow the melted lip balm to cool slightly, then mix again.

Pour the liquid plumping lip balm into your lip balm containers one at a time, remixing the base after each pour, then set aside to cool.

Once your lip balms have fully set up, screw on the caps and label as desired.

Like this recipe but don’t want to use clove bud essential oil? You can substitute the clove bud essential oil with another essential oil of your choice. Alternately you can add 3 mL of flavor oil.

If you don’t want to use lanolin, there’s not really a like substitute that will perform or feel exactly the same. However, you can substitute the lanolin with either shea butter or coconut oil or a heavy oil like avocado, olive or shea nut oil without having to change the amounts needed for my lip plumping lip balm recipe.

If you’re creating this tinted lip plumping lip balm recipe to sell you’ll need to be sure to label your lip balms so that they meet state and federal laws. If you’re unsure about the rules and regulations regarding labeling cosmetics, I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

This lip plumping lip balm recipe gives lips a zing with clove essential oil to help plump lips with the added bonus of copper shimmery tint!

If you like my tinted lip plumping lip balm recipe then you may also like my other lip balm recipes. You can find them all here. Or for more lip balm, homemade soap and other bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to follow my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest.

For more from Soap Deli News blog you can find and follow me on PinterestG+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Strawberry & Chocolate Fudge Solid Sugar Scrub Bars Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This strawberry and chocolate fudge solid sugar scrub bars recipe makes fantastic treats for your skin! Indulge in sugar and chocolate with none of the calories. These make great homemade gifts plus they're perfect for dry winter skin.

This strawberry & chocolate fudge solid sugar scrub bars recipe makes fantastic treats for your skin! Indulge in all of the sugar and chocolate your heart desires with none of the calories. Not only do my fudge solid sugar scrub bars make great homemade gifts – think Valentine’s Day! – they’re absolutely perfect for dry winter skin!

My fudge solid sugar scrub bars are incredibly easy to make and can be customized with every “flavor” combination you can dream up. Simply switch up the fragrance oils you choose to use – a chocolate fragrance oil combined with lavender essential oil is also an amazing combination! – and try different color variations. Following is the recipe. I hope you love these as much as I do! (I gave mine as homemade Christmas gifts this year.)

This strawberry and chocolate fudge solid sugar scrub bars recipe makes fantastic treats for your skin! Indulge in all of the sugar and chocolate your heart desires with none of the calories. Not only do my fudge solid sugar scrub bars make great homemade gifts - think Valentine's Day! - they're absolutely perfect for dry winter skin!

Strawberry & Chocolate Fudge Solid Sugar Scrub Bars Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients (fudge bottom):

2.5 oz. detergent free baby buttermilk melt & pour soap base
.35 oz. dark cocoa butter wafers
3.65 oz. refined shea butter
.5 oz. avocado oil
.7 oz. sweet almond oil
.5 oz. chocolate fragrance oil, or similar
16.5 oz. granulated white sugar

Ingredients: (strawberry icing):

1.25 oz. detergent free baby buttermilk melt & pour base
2 oz. refined shea butter
.6 oz. sweet almond oil
.25 oz. strawberries & champagne fragrance oil, or similar
8.25 oz. granulated white sugar
liquid red soap colorant, to suit

Instructions:

To create my strawberry and chocolate fudge solid sugar scrub bars, you’ll begin by making the fudge bottom and using those ingredients first. You’ll need a digital scale to weigh out the ingredients as well as an Ozera 6-Cavity Rectangle Silicone Soap Mold or similar.

Begin by weighing out the dark cocoa butter wafers, shea butter and soap base in the amounts called for in the ingredients for the fudge bottom. Combine in a double boiler and gently heat until melted.

If you do not have a double boiler, you can use a microwave. You’ll need to combine and melt the dark cocoa butter and shea butter first at 40-50% power until mostly melted then melt the soap base with the butters the rest of the way. You do not want to overheat your ingredients so stopping and melting the ingredients as you go is also helpful.

Once melted remove from heat.

Now weigh out the avocado and sweet almonds oils along with the fragrance oil of your choice and stir into the melted butters and soap base.

Next you’ll want to weigh out the sugar into a large Pyrex measuring cup.

Pour the sugar into the liquid mixture of oils, butters, soap and fragrance mixing as you go. Once thoroughly combined use a spatula to pour/spoon the mixture evenly into all six of the mold cavities. Flatten with the spatula. (Hint. Place your mold on a cutting board for easy transfer to another location later.)

The mixture will almost fill each cavity. This is what you want so you can build up an icing top.

While the bottom of your fudge solid sugar scrub bars are setting up, you’ll need to mix up the ingredients for the icing top!

Using a digital scale to weigh out all of the ingredients, heat and melt the shea butter and baby buttermilk soap base. Add the sweet almond oil and fragrance along with 2-4 drops of the liquid soap colorant. Then, just as you did with the fudge bottom, mix in the sugar.

Once the sugar is thoroughly combined you can begin spooning the strawberry “icing” top onto the tops of the fudge bottoms in your mold. Evenly add the mixture to the tops of all the mold cavities and then go back and spread the tops with a spatula or butter knife until the you reach your desired look.

(Hint. For a truer pink avoid using carrier oils that have a deep yellow or green tint to them if making substitutions for the sweet almond oil. You’ll also want to avoid fragrance oils with vanilla in them if you don’t want your tops to turn tan to brown over time.)

This strawberry and chocolate fudge solid sugar scrub bars recipe makes fantastic treats for your skin! Indulge in all of the sugar and chocolate your heart desires with none of the calories. Not only do my fudge solid sugar scrub bars make great homemade gifts they're absolutely perfect for dry winter skin!

Sprinkle the tops with fine ground pink Himalayan salt and fine ground sea salt as desired. This is optional but I think it looks nice!

Now place your fudge solid sugar scrub bars in the fridge until they harden completely.

This strawberry and chocolate fudge solid sugar scrub bars recipe makes fantastic treats for your skin! Indulge in all of the sugar and chocolate your heart desires with none of the calories. Not only do my fudge solid sugar scrub bars make great homemade gifts they're absolutely perfect for dry winter skin!

Once your strawberry and chocolate fudge solid sugar scrub bars have set up, carefully unmold them. Using a Chef’s knife, cut each scrub bar in half.

This strawberry and chocolate fudge solid sugar scrub bars recipe makes fantastic treats for your skin! Indulge in all of the sugar and chocolate your heart desires with none of the calories. Not only do my fudge solid sugar scrub bars make great homemade gifts they're absolutely perfect for dry winter skin!

Then wrap each of the two halves in Kabnet wax – or similar grease resistant deli wrap – and tie off them off with baker’s twine. (Hint. Places like Sam’s Club sell Kabnet Wax.)

If you are making my fudge solid sugar scrub bars to sell rather than to gift or for personal use, then you’ll need to be sure to label the bottoms of these to meet state and federal laws. If you’re unsure about the rules and regulations regarding labeling cosmetics, I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

Love my strawberry & chocolate fudge solid sugar scrub bars recipe? Discover more of my body scrub recipes here. Or follow my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board for even more great ideas.

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