Fizzing Shamrock Bath Truffles Recipe for St. Patrick’s Day

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Learn how to make this fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe for St. Patrick's Day! This easy fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a fizzy bath truffle that adds moisturizing cocoa butter to your bath water along with bubbles. Plus it's easy to remove from a silicone mold in one piece!

Learn how to make this fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe for St. Patrick’s Day!

This easy fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a fizzy bath truffle that adds moisturizing cocoa butter to your bath water along with bubbles. While it doesn’t have the dramatic effect of a bath bomb, it’s perfect for those who prefer less flair in their bath water. You’ll also find that my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a product that’s easy to remove from a silicone mold – so your fizzy bath truffles come out all in one piece!

Made with skin nourishing cocoa butter, my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe also contain dendritic salt, which has better oil absorption, greater fragrance retention and dissolves faster in water than regular salt. Ready to get started? Follow my recipe and instructions below!

Learn how to make this fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe for St. Patrick's Day!

Fizzing Shamrock Bath Truffles Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

4 oz. citric acid
8 oz. baking soda
2 oz. cocoa butter
1 oz. dendritic salt
.3 oz. SLSA
.15 oz. lime peel essential oil
1/2 teaspoon jade green crystal mica powder

Instructions:

You will need a digital scale for my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe in order to weigh the ingredients. (I recommend this Baker’s Math Scale if you plan to make a lot of bath, body or soap recipes.) You will also need the Wilton 8-Cavity Silicone Shamrock Mold which can be found online and in most craft stores.

This easy fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a fizzy bath truffle that adds moisturizing cocoa butter to your bath water along with bubbles. While it doesn't have the dramatic effect of a bath bomb, it's perfect for those who prefer less flair in their bath water. You'll also find that my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a product that's easy to remove from a silicone mold - so your fizzy bath truffles come out all in one piece!

Being by weighing out the cocoa butter in either a double boiler or a glass Pyrex container. Heat the cocoa butter in your double boiler or in a heat safe glass container in the microwave at 50% power until melted.

Set aside to cool slightly.

This easy fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a fizzy bath truffle that adds moisturizing cocoa butter to your bath water along with bubbles. While it doesn't have the dramatic effect of a bath bomb, it's perfect for those who prefer less flair in their bath water. You'll also find that my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a product that's easy to remove from a silicone mold - so your fizzy bath truffles come out all in one piece!

Now weigh out the citric acid, baking soda, dendritic salt, and SLSA and combine in a large glass. (You may want to wear a face mask for this step. Both the SLSA and the citric acid are finer particles that can cause coughing as they are released into the air.)

This easy fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a fizzy bath truffle that adds moisturizing cocoa butter to your bath water along with bubbles. While it doesn't have the dramatic effect of a bath bomb, it's perfect for those who prefer less flair in their bath water. You'll also find that my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a product that's easy to remove from a silicone mold - so your fizzy bath truffles come out all in one piece!

Using a teaspoon measure, measure out the jade green mica and add to the other dry ingredients. Now mix the dry ingredients thoroughly together.

Next, weigh out the essential oil and stir into the melted cocoa butter.

This easy fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a fizzy bath truffle that adds moisturizing cocoa butter to your bath water along with bubbles. While it doesn't have the dramatic effect of a bath bomb, it's perfect for those who prefer less flair in their bath water. You'll also find that my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a product that's easy to remove from a silicone mold - so your fizzy bath truffles come out all in one piece!

Combine the dry ingredients with the scented cocoa butter and mix well.

You can now begin filling five of the cavities of your shamrock silicone mold. To do this, I recommend filling one cavity at a time. Loosely add the fizzing bath truffles mix to fill one cavity. Then pile more on top to form a mountain. Next, firmly press the ingredients into the mold cavity. Resist pushing so hard that the cavity bows out on the sides, but enough that the mixture is firmly packed.

Proceed with filling four additional cavities of your shamrock mold.

Once you’ve filled the mold, set the molded fizzing bath bomb truffles aside out of the way in a dry location.

Wait two days, then carefully unmold your fizzing shamrock bath truffles.

This easy fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a fizzy bath truffle that adds moisturizing cocoa butter to your bath water along with bubbles. While it doesn't have the dramatic effect of a bath bomb, it's perfect for those who prefer less flair in their bath water. You'll also find that my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a product that's easy to remove from a silicone mold - so your fizzy bath truffles come out all in one piece!

Wrap and label your completed fizzing bath truffles as desired for personal use or for gifting.

To use, simply add to warm, running bath water and enjoy!

My fizzing shamrock bath truffles don’t have the same flair as bath bombs however they do create bubbles and fill your bath with nourishing cocoa butter. These are perfect for people that don’t want super colored bathwater and strong fragrances.

If you plan to sell your fizzing shamrock bath truffles, you’ll need to follow FDA guidelines for labeling your product. If you’re unsure about the rules and regulations regarding labeling cosmetics, I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

It is important to note that, as this product contains SLSA, it is considered a foaming detergent bath product. As such labeling requires an additional caution to be printed on the label unless it states that the product is for adult use only. This is in addition to the ingredient list and directions for use and other information required for cosmetic labeling.

FDA information on labeling foaming detergent bath products ie. bath bombs and/or bubble bar with SLSA.

Above is a screenshot of this requirement from the FDA website for cosmetic labeling regulations regarding this product.

This easy fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a fizzy bath truffle that adds moisturizing cocoa butter to your bath water along with bubbles. While it doesn't have the dramatic effect of a bath bomb, it's perfect for those who prefer less flair in their bath water. You'll also find that my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe creates a product that's easy to remove from a silicone mold - so your fizzy bath truffles come out all in one piece!

Notes:

Be sure to use your fizzy bath truffles within a few months for best results as citric acid begins to lose it’s potency once exposed to air.

In addition I also received some helpful tips for making bath bombs on one of my instagram posts!

The Bubbling Mermaid suggests when formulating your own bath bombs or bath fizzies for use in a silicone mold that you add kaolin clay for ease of removal. While The Chequered Lily also recommends curing your bath fizzies in a silicone mold for at least 48 hours.

Handmade Magic Shamrock Bath Bombs from SpaGlo

If you don’t have the time to create my fizzing shamrock bath truffles recipe you can find similar handmade products on Etsy like this set of two magic bath bomb shamrocks from SpaGlo. Or you can browse for more shamrock bath bombs here.

For more recipes like my fizzing bath truffles recipe as well as other homemade bath and body and soap recipes, be sure to check out my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest. You can also find me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


DIY Solid Sugar Scrub Snowballs

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

These sparkling DIY solid sugar scrub snowballs are not only a fun way to pamper yourself this winter, but they also make unique DIY Christmas gift ideas for any bath and body lover!

These sparkling DIY solid sugar scrub snowballs are not only a fun way to pamper yourself this winter, but they also make unique DIY Christmas gift ideas for any bath and body lover! These DIY solid sugar scrub snowballs are are pretty straight forward and easy to make. Just give yourself a few hours and you’ve got the perfect pampering Christmas gift!

These sparkling DIY solid sugar scrub snowballs are not only a fun way to pamper yourself this winter, but they also make unique DIY Christmas gift ideas for any bath and body lover!

DIY Solid Sugar Scrub Snowballs

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

.6 oz. shea butter
1 oz. cocoa butter
.25 oz. emulsifying wax
1.5 oz. refined coconut oil
.35 oz. grapeseed oil
.1 oz. fragrance oil, optional
11.4 oz. white granulated sugar
pinch to 1/4 teaspoon blue ultramarine pigment powder

“Snow Sparkle” Ingredients:

2 oz. white granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon white, pearl or Diamond dust mica powder

Instructions:

To make these DIY solid sugar scrub snowballs, begin by using a digital scale to weigh out the shea butter, cocoa butter and emulsifying wax. Combine in a double boiler or a large glass Pyrex measuring cup then heat in the double boiler or in the microwave at 50% power until all the ingredients have melted. Remove from heat.

Weigh out the grapeseed oil – or another carrier oil like hemp seed oil, rosehip seed oil, pumpkin seed oil, or jojoba oil – the coconut oil and, if desired, the fragrance oil you’ve chosen to use. (You can also use half the amount in an essential oil or essential oil blend of your choice.) Stir into the melted butter and wax mixture until they are completely melted.

In a separate container, weigh out 11.4 oz. of sugar. Depending on how blue you want your snowballs, add a pinch to 1/4 teaspoon of the blue ultramarine pigment powder. (You can use other colors as well or omit the color all together.) Whisk the pigment powder into the sugar until it is evenly distributed throughout and there are no clumps.

Allow the melted butters, wax and oils to cool slightly. You want to be able to handle the oil without being burned.

While this cools, prepare your snow sparkle ingredients. Weigh out 2 oz. of sugar into a container. Now measure out the mica and whisk into the sugar until it’s evenly incorporated.

Now slowly pour the sugar into the melted butters, wax and oils whisking with a fork as you go.

You’re now ready to form your snowballs! I used my hands for this part, however you could also use a bath bomb mold or a meat baller for uniform sugar scrub snowballs.

Lay a piece of wax or parchment paper onto a flat working surface and pour about half of the snow sparkle ingredients on the paper. Now form the sugar scrub mixture into balls the desired size. These will feel like they aren’t very solid and a little like they won’t stay together, but they will. Pack the balls as tightly as you can then roll them into the snow sparkle ingredients one at a time, adding more of the sugar and mica mixture as needed. Sprinkle additional sugar and mica onto the balls as desired.

Arrange the snowballs you’ve just made gently onto a plate, the place the plate in the refrigerator for about an hour or until the snowballs have hardened completely.

These sparkling DIY solid sugar scrub snowballs are not only a fun way to pamper yourself this winter, but they also make unique DIY Christmas gift ideas for any bath and body lover! These DIY solid sugar scrub snowballs are pretty straight forward and easy to make. Just give yourself a few hours and you've got the perfect pampering Christmas gift!

Now remove the solid sugar scrub snowballs from the refrigerator and package as desired in a large mason jar or in plastic containers. Your completed DIY solid sugar scrub snowballs not only crush easily in the tub or shower for use, but also offer nourishing moisture and exfoliation for dry skin without feeling oily. And they sparkle just like real snow!

(Your final quantity of sparking snowball sugar scrubs will depend on the size you choose to make your solid sugar scrubs. The combined weight of all your ingredients will tell you the total amount of your final product. If you live in a warm climate, I recommend decreasing the amount of grapeseed oil to .25 oz. and increasing the emulsifying wax to .35 oz. as a starting point.)

Now simply label or decorate your packaging as desired for gifting!

For more of my homemade bath and body recipes as well as favorites from around the web, be sure to check out and follow my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest. If you’re looking more homemade Christmas gift ideas, you’ll also enjoy my Christmas gift idea boards on PinterestUnique DIY Christmas Gift Ideas and DIY Stocking Stuffer Sized Christmas Gifts. You can also find and follow me via Blog Lovin’ and TumblrFacebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Homemade Cranberry Body Butter Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

This homemade cranberry body butter recipe makes a wonderful homemade Christmas gift idea! Plus you'll love the less greasy formula!

This homemade cranberry body butter recipe is easy to craft and makes a wonderful homemade Christmas gift idea. Not only does it smell delectable – and seasonally suited! – but it’s not as greasy as many traditional body butters.

This homemade cranberry body butter recipe makes a wonderful homemade Christmas gift idea!

Cranberry Body Butter Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

3 oz. refined shea butter
.25 oz. refined/deodorized cocoa butter
.2 oz. grapeseed oil
.1 oz. Cyclomethicone
.05 oz. pure tapioca starch
.1 oz. cranberry fragrance oil of choice
pinch coral oil locking mica shimmer, optional

Instructions:

Using a digital kitchen scale weigh out the cocoa and shea butter into a large glass Pyrex measuring cup. Heat at reduced power until the butters have melted. Carefully remove the butters from the microwave – use a pot holder as the glass will be hot! – then weigh and add the remaining ingredients.

I used both the Cyclomethicone and the tapioca starch to make this cranberry body butter recipe less greasy. You can omit one or either however it will alter the feel of the final product. For the fragrance I used a Frosted Cranberry fragrance oil but you can choose your favorite or omit it for an unscented body butter. (You can also use Cyclomethicone in this awesome dry body oil spray recipe.)

Stir well and use a stick blender if needed to fully incorporate the color. It will want to settle onto the bottom if not mixed thoroughly. Allow to harden overnight then stir once more before use. (You can speed this up by placing your cranberry body butter in the fridge.)

This cranberry body butter recipe yields enough body butter to fit into one 4 oz. jar. I used a small Ball 4 oz. jelly mason jar from the grocery store for this particular recipe.

To use simply scoop out a small amount and rub onto skin as desired. Keep in mind that a little goes a long way!

 This homemade cranberry body butter recipe makes a wonderful homemade Christmas gift idea!

To create labels for the tops of your jars of body butter you will need a full size sheet of sticker paper, a marker, a stamp you like and a stamp pad. I used a StazOn Multi-Surface Inkpad to prevent smudging. Turn your sticker paper upside down so you are drawing on the portion you peel off and then trace around the inside of the mason jar ring.

Now cut around the line you just drew with scissors.

Next, place the stamp you are using firmly on the ink pad to ensure even coverage then stamp the front of the sticker paper circle you just cut out. Remove the backing from the sticker paper and place the stamped sticker onto the top of the lid. It’s that easy!

For more homemade bath and body recipes be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also find more skin care recipes and homemade Christmas gift ideas by following my Pinterest boards. If you’d like to read more from Soap Deli News be sure to follow me on Tumblr, Blog Lovin’, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Free Shea Body Butter Recipes eBook

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Free Holiday Body Butter Recipes Ebook with a DIY Homemade Pumpkin Body Butter Recipe

The ebook, Holiday Body Butter Recipes: Simple Body Butter to Make and Give: Homemade Body Butters for Every Occasion, is free today from Amazon! Includes a recipe for a seasonal DIY Pumpkin Pie Body Butter Recipe! So how can you resist? Download this kindle ebook free for a limited time here.

Also available today at no cost is a similar title, Homemade Shea Body Butter Recipes for Beginners: All-Natural Quick & Easy Recipes to Eliminate Eczema, Acne, Dry Skin, Stretch Marks, Sunburn & More. You can get that book here.

The Soap Making Bible is an invaluable resource for beginning soapmakers and is free today from Amazon!

If you also love soapmaking, be sure to get The Soap Making Bible, also free today. It includes beautiful, print friendly PDF’s with soap recipes, instructions, troubleshooting tips and more. Add your own notes to the prints to personalise your soap making bible even further. It also includes invaluable tips like the most common mistakes that many soap makers encounter so you can avoid them. This ebook includes troubleshooting tips and easy to follow instructions designed for beginners along with a great collection of homemade soap recipes. Download The Soapmaking Bible here.

If you don’t own a kindle you can still get these kindle titles. Simply download Amazon’s free kindle reading app here. It works on most computers, tablets and smartphones.

(If you missed out on these free ebooks – these free kindle ebook offers come and go rather quickly generally lasting only a day or two – no worries. Simply visit Amazon’s best sellers in Crafts, Hobbies and Home here for a list of all current free ebooks in this category and click on the Top 100 Free tab.)


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Cooking and Baking with Mace – The Vintage Spice You’ve Never Tried But Should

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Recently I read what I thought to be a rather interesting article on Etsy’s blog titled The Historic Spice Cupboard. It contained some really neat information on vintage spices – rather the spices our great and great great grandparents probably used – in cooking and baking. Some of the spices are still used today, while others are a lot less common. For example, mace, is not a spice I had ever heard of.
Cooking with spices - Mace(Photo Source: theKitchn)

I’ve always thought of mace as pepper spray so I was a little confused at first. But as it turns out, mace is a very close relative of nutmeg. Mace is actually the red membrane that surrounds the nutmeg seed. It’s very similar to the taste of nutmeg, but rather has a more red pepper reminiscent heat. It was very common in the 18th and 19th centuries, but has since fallen by the way side. Like nutmeg, it can be used in baking. However it is also served well in savory dishes for flavoring meats, stews, curries, savory sauces, and even homemade pickles. You can also use it in teas, tinctures and beverages.

Additionally, it’s believed that mace has an antioxidant effect in the liver, helping it conserve glutathione and increasing protection against free radicals. theKitchn has additional information on this amazing vintage spice. You can also find out more information on mace from Mountain Rose Herbs including both contemporary and folklore info.

If you want to try mace, be sure to buy it from a reputable source that guarantees that the powder is not made from previously BWP (broken-wormy-punky) nuts. It’s also better not to use an irradiated product which breaks down the fatty acids that contain the essential oils that give it aroma and flavor. Mountain Rose Herbs is great place to buy both whole and ground organic mace. In fact, I have it on my next shopping list of things to buy from them since it’s so versatile and can be used in so many different types of recipes. I’ve also found it to be a common ingredient in many Indian dishes.

Following are just a few of the many recipes I’ve found that can be made with mace:

Have you ever cooked with mace?


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.