DIY Agate Slice Soaps That Anyone Can Make!

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Learn how to craft your own stunning DIY agate slice soaps! Agate slice coasters are HUGE right now. However I don’t really have a practical need for them. And I can only imagine my stemless wine glasses sliding right off of them halfway through the night. So I thought I’d recreate those coasters as soaps!

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

Not only will my gold rimmed DIY agate slice soaps look lovely in your bathroom, but they also make perfect housewarming or hostess gifts. AND you can actually use them without having to worry about breaking anything! (If you’re like me you get handsy when you combine wine and good conversation.)

During my research for this soapmaking project, I found one tutorial for crafting DIY agate slice soaps. However, it required making a soap geode that you then slice. I’ve made soap geodes before. They’re lots of fun, but somewhat time consuming. They are also insanely crazy SUPER messy. (You can check out my geode soap tutorial here.)

In addition, as soap geodes are round, when you slice them you end up with agate soap slices in varying sizes. Obviously the ends are less pretty and much smaller than the slices from the center.

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

My solution for making DIY agate slice soaps simply skipped making a round soap geode all together. Instead, I used a silicone soap mold with round cavities for consistent sizing. This also made the entire soapmaking process quicker and easier.

I hope you’ll also find my agate slice soap tutorial easy. It may seem intimidating at first, but you’ll find that if you give it a try, it’s surprising simple to make.

One of my favorite things about working with melt and pour soap is that it’s so versatile as an artistic medium. And when you start to see soap as an art medium, like paint for instance, it opens up so many new doors to be creative. This is one of those projects.

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

DIY Agate Slice Soaps

© Rebecca Dawn Dillon

Ingredients:

12 oz. Stephenson Crystal Natural HF Melt & Pour Soap Base
12 oz. Stephenson Suspension Melt & Pour Soap Base
.5 oz. skin safe fragrance oil
additional clear melt & pour soap, to suit
eco-friendly biodegradable glitter, to suit
mica powder, to suit
liquid soap colorant, to suit
99% isopropyl alcohol, as needed

Instructions:

In addition to the ingredients for my DIY agate slice soaps, you will also need a digital scale, a basic round silicone soap mold (my cavities were 3″ in diameter and 1″ deep) and six scientific glass beakers and/or glass Pyrex measuring cups.

Tip: You can also use this mold to make melt and pour loofah soaps! Find my melt and pour loofah soap tutorial here. You can purchase loofah that works with this mold here.

I specifically chose to work with Stephenson melt & pour soap bases for this project as they cool and harden rather quickly compared to some of the other bases. This allowed me to pour my different layers and colors of soap one after the other without having to wait for the bases to cool down in between pours.

Begin by cutting a small chunk of clear melt and pour soap into tiny soap shards for your agate slice soap centers. Set aside.

Using a digital scale, weigh out 12 oz. of the suspension melt and pour soap. Cut into chunks and combine in a 4 oz. glass Pyrex measuring cup. Heat in the microwave in 30 second increments until fully melted, gently stirring after each heating.

Weigh out .25 oz. of fragrance oil and mix into the melted soap base. (I used a rose quartz fragrance oil.)

Divide the melted soap into three containers as desired. (I used varying quantities in each of my containers.) Then add a bit of liquid soap colorant and/or mica and/or glitter to each container and stir to combine. (I used a combination of liquid violet soap colorant, three different shades of purple toned micas and a combination of both chunky and fine glitters of various colors. In the smallest beaker I simply used gold mica and iridescent glitter.) Mix in the colorants and glitter, then set the soap containers aside.

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

Now weigh out 12 oz. of the clear crystal melt and pour soap base. Cut the soap into chunks and heat until melted, the same as you did with the suspension soap base. Weigh out .25 oz. of fragrance oil and stir into the melted soap.

Now divide the soap into three separate containers and mix in varying colors of mica and/or soap colorant as desired.

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

You can now begin filling your soap mold. You will need to work quickly as the soap base hardens rather quickly in small quantities. However, if necessary, you can go back and reheat the soap bases as needed.

Fill five of the mold cavities with a single color in various amounts. Then dust the soap shards you set aside previously with glitter. Add about one third of the soap shards to the center of the mold cavities on top of the soap you just poured.

Follow with additional soap types and colors. You can pour the soap in various places within the cavities of your mold, or you can pour the soap in a circle around the outer edge of the mold cavities each time for a more circular pattern. Continue adding the remaining soap shards as you go occasionally dusting with glitter. You can also use a chopstick or utensil to swirl or pull colors up and into one another if desired.

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

Once the cavities of your mold are filled, dust the tops with glitter and spritz with isopropyl alcohol. Allow the soap to harden completely then gently unmold.

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

Using a sharp knife, carefully cut the top of each soap off so it’s smooth. This not only smooths out the soap tops so they are level but it also allows more of that awesome mystery design you poured to show through.

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

Then cut each soap round in half. This will give you ten beautiful agate slice soaps.

Now place the soap slices onto parchment or wax paper so you can paint the edges.

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

To paint the edges of your DIY agate slice soaps, combine a gold or copper colored mica with isopropyl alcohol. You want the paint fluid but not too thin. Just thin enough that it will glide easily with a brush leaving a solid color behind. Now use a small paint brush to paint the edges of your agate slice soaps.

If needed, you can apply a second coat of mica to your soaps once the first coat dries.

Allow your DIY agate slice soaps to fully dry, then wrap tightly in foodservice film for personal use or gifting!

If you want to craft these DIY agate slice soaps to sell, you’ll need to follow good manufacturing practices (GMP) when making your product. You’ll find that the book, Good Manufacturing Practices for Soap and Cosmetic Handcrafters by Marie Gale, is a valuable resource if you’re just getting started making your own homemade soaps, skin care products and cosmetics.

In addition to GMP, you’ll also need to follow FDA guidelines for labeling your products. If you’re unsure about the rules and regulations regarding labeling cosmetics, the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English by Marie Gale, spells out everything you need to know to legally label your products.

Learn how to create beautiful DIY agate slice soaps quickly and easily with this fun soapmaking tutorial without having to create a soap geode first!

If you make your own DIY agate slice soaps, I’d love to see how yours turn out! After all, each agate slice soap is going to be different and therefore its own little work of art! So please tag the soaps you make using the hashtag #soapdelishowoff when you share them on instagram so I can take a peek!

For more soapmaking tutorials like this one, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking board on Pinterest. You can also find and follow me on all of your favorite social media platforms including G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or subscribe to Soap Deli News via email for future updates, DIY projects and recipes.


Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Odor Neutralizing Candle DIY

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

This odor neutralizing candle DIY will teach you how to create your own beautifully scented soy and beeswax candles that neutralize odors in the air while giving off a fresh fragrance as they burn. These odor neutralizing candles are relatively easy to make and they really do work! I tested mine in the kitchen after my boyfriend made curry.

This odor neutralizing candle DIY will teach you how to create your own beautifully scented soy and beeswax candles that neutralize odors in the air while giving off a fresh fragrance as they burn. These odor neutralizing candles are relatively easy to make and they really do work! I tested mine in the kitchen after my boyfriend made curry.

Use an odor neutralizing candle anywhere in your home that you need to tackle tough odors in such as the kitchen or bathroom. These odor neutralizing candles also make wonderful housewarming gifts as well as DIY wedding favors.

This odor neutralizing candle DIY will teach you how to create your own beautifully scented soy and beeswax candles that neutralize odors in the air while giving off a fresh fragrance as they burn. These odor neutralizing candles are relatively easy to make and they really do work! I tested mine in the kitchen after my boyfriend made curry.

Odor Neutralizing Candle DIY

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7.5 oz. soy wax
3.25 oz. beeswax
1.1 oz. odor neutralizing fragrance oil, of choice

Tools & Materials:

2 – 7.75 oz. frosted candle jars
medium wood wicks
microwave (or double boiler)
4 cup glass Pyrex measuring cup
digital scale

Instructions:

This odor neutralizing candle DIY will make two candles. I used two beautiful frosted 7.75 oz. candle jars from SKS Bottle & Packaging for this project.

I purchased my odor neutralizing fragrance oils from Wholesale Supplies Plus. They offer the following odor neutralizing scent options: Mango Berry Tea, Agave Nectar, Island Breeze, Seaside Cotton, Orange Guava and Country Clothesline.

To make your odor neutralizing candles you’ll begin by using a digital scale to weigh out both the soy wax and the beeswax into the glass Pyrex measuring cup. Heat the waxes in the microwave at 50% power until the wax melts. (Alternately you can melt the wax in a double boiler.) Carefully remove the container of wax from the microwave using a potholder or towel – the glass will be hot! – and set aside to cool.

Now prepare your wood wicks. Measure the height needed and cut four wooden candle wicks to fit so that they are level with the top of the frosted candle jar when placed inside. Place the wood wick(s) in the molten wax for ten minutes then carefully remove using a utensil or tongs.

Next, place the wicks into two metal anchors using two wicks for each anchor so they are doubled up. Now dip the anchors into the wax and place the wicks into the center of each of your candle jars.

Continue to allow the melted wax to cool. When it starts to become cloudy, weigh out the odor neutralizing fragrance oil in the scent you chose and stir it into the melted wax.

Now carefully pour the wax evenly into each of the frosted candle jars and allow it to cool and harden completely. (You don’t want to pour the wax too hot or the tops of your candle wax may crack as they cool. It’s also possible to warp your candle jar.)

Do not burn your odor neutralizing candles for at least 24 hours.

This odor neutralizing candle DIY will teach you how to create your own beautifully scented soy and beeswax candles that neutralize odors in the air while giving off a fresh fragrance as they burn. These odor neutralizing candles are relatively easy to make and they really do work!

If desired you can easily decorate the outside of your candle jars. I used Fragrance Garden Deco Stickers I purchased from pikwahchan on Etsy. These stickers are a 3-D clear, hard plastic that’s also waterproof so they work well on the outside of glass candle jars.

When you’re ready to burn your candle, simply cut the wick to 1/4″ using a wick trimmer, then light with a match or lighter until the flame takes.

If you’re gifting your odor neutralizing candle as a housewarming gift, you may want to consider pairing it with a Wickman Candle Accessory Gift Pack that includes a Wick Trimmer, Wick Dipper and Bell Snuffer.

If you enjoyed this candle making project, you may also like my DIY for creating a leather scented mandle – a man candle with a leather fragrance. You can find that candle making tutorial here.

Want to learn about making your own candles? Check out the book, The Candlemaker's Companion: A Complete Guide to Rolling, Pouring, Dipping, and Decorating Your Own Candles, by Betty Oppenheimer. This book contains illustrated directions, complete source lists, and plenty of practical advice for beginner candlemakers.

Want to learn about making your own candles? Check out the book, The Candlemaker’s Companion: A Complete Guide to Rolling, Pouring, Dipping, and Decorating Your Own Candles, by Betty Oppenheimer. This book contains illustrated directions, complete source lists, and plenty of practical advice for beginner candlemakers. Get it here.

For more DIY ideas and projects be sure to follow me on Pinterest. You can also find me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebookTwitterG+ and Instagram.


Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Natural Homemade Tomato Soap Recipe with Printable Labels

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

DIY Natural Homemade Tomato and Basil Cold Process Soap Recipe with Printable LabelsOver spaghetti sauce? Use up those overripe tomatoes to make this homemade tomato soap recipe!

If you’re like me and had a garden this past summer, then you know how somehow you always end up with too much of one thing and not enough of another. For me, I ended up with too many peppers as they were the only plants that fared well this year. In fact, I still have six plants that are producing and a crisper packed to the top.

On the other hand, I had almost no tomatoes as we got way too much rain this year. Seriously, we were averaging more rain than Seattle at one point. So our tomatoes sort of bit the dust. Since the peppers keep I’m still trying to figure out what to do with them all. But tomatoes, they don’t keep for nearly as long. And while my tomato plants bit the dust, my co-worker’s plants did not and I ended up with a lot of his extras. Some of which were too ripe to slice without water exploding everywhere. And since I’m far from being a chef I didn’t think spaghetti sauce or salsa. I thought soap. So I created a homemade tomato soap recipe that used a few of the ripe tomatoes I had and didn’t know what to do with. (Plus I think Scott was over eating tomato sandwiches everyday. I’m not the biggest fan.)

I’ve made homemade soaps in the past that incorporated ripe bananas in the recipe and they turned out way better than my banana bread ever did. So I figured why not throw some tomatoes into a batch. As it turns out, you can actually sub tomatoes for your entire water content in a tomato soap recipe. I wasn’t sure how to mix the lye into an entire mess of tomatoes though. Nor was I sure exactly how it would react. So instead I used a little bit of distilled water to dissolve the lye and smashed up tomatoes separately for the rest of the liquid. I also used some basil powder and basil essential oil for a natural scent. Here’s the tomato soap recipe I came up with. (And the printable labels too!)

DIY Natural Homemade Tomato and Basil Cold Process Soap Recipe with Printable Labels

Natural Basil and Tomato Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

1.8 oz. cocoa butter
2.6 oz. shea butter
9 oz. palm oil
7.2 oz. 76 degree melt point coconut oil
11.8 oz. pomace olive oil
3.6 oz. castor oil

4.9 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide
6 fluid oz. distilled water

1 Tablespoon basil powder
.75 oz. basil essential oil
8.5 oz. pureed ripe tomatoes
1 Tablespoon walnut shell powder

Instructions:

You’ll need to follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions for this homemade tomato recipe. This soap will fit into one of my DIY wood loaf soap molds and will yield approximately 10-11 4.5 oz. soap bars. Take all necessary safety precautions.

Start by measuring out the distilled water, then weigh out the lye using a digital kitchen scale and stir into the distilled water. Set aside to cool in a well ventilated area.

Now weigh out all of the soapmaking oils – cocoa butter, shea butter, palm oil, coconut oil, olive oil and castor oil – and place in large non-aluminum pot. Heat over medium heat on the stove until all of the oils have melted, then remove from heat and set aside to cool.

While the soapmaking oils and lye-water are cooling, line your soap mold and prepare the other ingredients. Weight out the ripe tomatoes and remove stems and leaves, then mash with a fork or similar utensil. If your tomatoes are super ripe you won’t need to use anything else. Set aside. Using separate containers for each ingredient, weigh out the basil essential oil, and measure out the basil and walnut shell powders. Set aside.

Once your ingredients have cooled to between 95 and 110 degrees, pour the pureed tomatoes into the soapmaking oils and mix well with an immersion/stick hand blender. Then slowly pour the lye-water into the soap oils and tomato puree and mix until you reach trace.

Now pour 1/3 of the soap into your mold and tap to level. Evenly sprinkle the walnut shell powder across the poured soap.

Now add the basil powder and basil essential oil to the remaining soap in the pot and mix well with the blender. Once thoroughly combined, slowly pour the remaining soap on top of the first layer of soap and the walnut shell powder. Level the soap as much as possible so the final size of your bars will be consistent. I generally level out the top of my soap using a butter knife. I run a butter knife back and forth along the width of the mold to evenly distribute the soap, then run it back and forth along the length.

Now cover and insulate your mold for twenty-four hours. After the inuslation period your soap is ready to unmold. Remove your soap from the mold and cut into bars. You can use soap cutter as a guide for evenly sized bars. Set the cut bar onto a wax or parchment paper covered surface – or a cooling rack – and allow to cure for at least three weeks before use.

DIY Natural Homemade Tomato and Basil Cold Process Soap Recipe with Printable Labels

Once your tomato soaps have cured, you can use them immediately or package them. For my soaps, I wrapped them in professional plastic food wrap film– this stuff works GREAT for wrapping soaps and is MUCH cheaper than buying small containers of cling wrap – and then label. I printed out my labels onto blank full page Kraft sticker label sheets and then colored in select areas with permanent color markers. However, they look great in black and white too! {Download my Natural Tomato & Basil Soap Recipe and Printable Soap Labels here.}

For more of my homemade soap recipes be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also more of my favorite homemade soap recipes from around the web along with bath and beauty DIY’s by following my boards on Pinterest. Or simply keep up with all of my new blog posts and recipes by following me on Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr as well as on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and G+.


Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


DIY Pumpkin Scented Massage Candle with Printable Labels

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Homemade Gift Idea - DIY Pumpkin Scented Massage Candle with Wood Wick

Create the perfect homemade gift for fall with this easy Perfect Pumpkin Massage Candle DIY! Not only does it scent the room with the mouth watering fragrance of pumpkin pie with a touch of cinnamon and clove spice and just a hint of maple syrup, but you can massage the melted wax onto your skin just like a lotion! Printable pumpkin labels tie it all together and make it perfect for gifting!

How to Make Massage Candles - DIY Pumpkin Massage Candle - Handmade Gift Idea

DIY Perfect Pumpkin Massage Candles

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

65 grams soy wax
10 grams refined shea butter
7 grams Perfect Pumpkin fragrance oil

Supplies:

Small soft wooden wicks
4 oz. deep round tin with lid
blank full page Kraft sticker label sheets (I used the ones from WorldLabel.com)

Tools:

digital kitchen scale
metal utensil for stirring
glass pyrex measuring cup
plastic transfer pipette
permanent color markers (optional)
pot holder or kitchen towel
Printable Perfect Pumpkin Massage Candle Labels
microwave
scissors
printer

Instructions:

This recipe yields one 4 oz. candle. However, with the minimum purchase of materials you purchase – 1 lb. soy wax, 2 oz. fragrance oil, 12 oz. shea butter, 10 wooden wicks, and 10 metal tins – you can make about seven candles. If you prefer to use essential oil rather than a fragrance oil, use half the amount of a skin safe essential oil. (Also be sure to try these candles in Frosted Cranberry!)

Start by placing the wooden wick inside the metal tin then use scissors to cut the wick so it’s just a hair shorter than the tin. Place the wick inside the metal base and set inside the middle of the metal tin.

Now, using a digital kitchen scale, weigh out the soy wax and shea butter inside the glass pyrex measuring cup. Heat in the microwave until the wax and shea butter have melted, approximately 2 minutes. Carefully remove from the microwave using a pot holder or kitchen towel as the measuring cup will be hot.

Place the container of wax and shea butter onto the digital kitchen scale and press tare. Using a plastic transfer pipette to slowly add the fragrance oil to the wax base, weigh out 7 grams of fragrance oil. Then stir with a metal utensil. I generally use a butter knife.

Now slowly pour all of the scented wax into the metal tin. If your wick shifts, don’t worry. You can easily reposition it after you’ve poured the wax.

Handmade Pumpkin Scented Massage Candle for Fall - Made with Natural Soy Wax and a Perfect Pumpkin Fragrance Oil

Finally, allow the wax to cool completely then label, use or gift! The safety and caution label should go on the bottom of each candle. If desired, you can color in the labels with markers to give your candles a handmade touch or to express your own creativity. Be sure to trim your wick to 1/4″ high before every use and blow out the candle before dipping your fingers into the wax to avoid accidental burns from the flame. {Download the Printable Perfect Pumpkin Massage Candle Labels here.}

Just can’t get enough of the fabulous seasonal scent of pumpkin pie? Then be sure to also try out this recipe for crafting Homemade Perfect Pumpkin Salt Scrubs! These exfoliating salt scrubs are hand crafted with nutrient rich pumpkin seed oil and real pumpkin seed flakes for a fabulous bath time treat!

For more DIY projects like this one as well as seasonal holiday homemade gift ideas, be sure to follow my boards on Pinterest!


Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


How to Make Homemade Massage Candles

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

How to Make Homemade Massage Candles - DIY Festive Holiday Gift Idea - Frosted Cranberry Massage Candle DIY with Printable Labels

Since around 2006 massage candles, also known as lotion candles, have risen in popularity. These nifty 2-in-1 candles not only make your home smell great, but the melted, liquified wax can also be used to massage onto skin to moisturize and add a lovely fragrance to your skin.

Most massage candles I’ve come across are simply make from natural soy wax, which has a low melt point of about 102 degrees F, and fragrance. However, when I was at Floyd Fest over the summer, there was a vendor there selling massage candles made wth not only soy wax, but also with shea butter and essential oils. As prospective customers would approach her booth, she would offer them a “hand job” and massage the melted wax from these candles onto each recipients’ hand. She would then give each customer a sticker that stated, “I got a hand job from” her company name.

How to Make Homemade Massage Candles for Handmade Gifts or DIY Wedding Favors

I really loved the addition of the shea butter, so I decided to try my own. These are super simple to make – definitely easier than making homemade soap from scratch – and you can scent with them your choice of essential oils or with a fragrance oil like I did for mine. I’ve created this massage candle recipe to make one single 4 oz. candle at a time, but you can make multiples at once by simply doubling the recipe as needed. I also chose to use wooden wicks for these candles as not only do I love the burn of a wood wick, but they are a lot easier to work with for beginners.

I LOVE these for handmade Christmas gift ideas, stocking stuffers, housewarming gifts or even DIY winter wedding favors! You’ll really be surprised by how amazingly easy these are to craft. Plus, I’ve included printable labels to make packaging your candles a snap! Dress them up further with your favorite patterned washi tape.

DIY Handmade Frosted Cranberry Massage Candles with Printable Labels - Lovely Homemade Christmas Gift Idea

DIY Frosted Cranberry Massage Candles

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

65 grams soy wax
10 grams refined shea butter
7 grams Frosted Cranberry fragrance oil

Supplies:

Small soft wooden wicks
4 oz. deep round tin with lid
blank white sticker label sheets

Tools:

digital kitchen scale
metal utensil for stirring
glass pyrex measuring cup
plastic transfer pipette
permanent color markers
pot holder or kitchen towel
microwave
scissors
printer

Instructions:

This recipe yields one 4 oz. candle. However, with the minimum purchase of materials you purchase – 1 lb. soy wax, 2 oz. fragrance oil, 12 oz. shea butter, 10 wooden wicks, and 10 metal tins – you can make about seven candles. If you prefer to use essential oil rather than a fragrance oil, use half the amount of a skin safe essential oil.

Start by placing the wooden wick inside the metal tin then use scissors to cut the wick so it’s just a hair shorter than the tin. Place the wick inside the metal base and set inside the middle of the metal tin.

Now, using a digital kitchen scale, weigh out the soy wax and shea butter inside the glass pyrex measuring cup. Heat in the microwave until the wax and shea butter have melted, approximately 2 minutes. Carefully remove from the microwave using a pot holder or kitchen towel as the measuring cup will be hot.

Place the container of wax and shea butter onto the digital kitchen scale and press tare. Using a plastic transfer pipette to slowly add the fragrance oil to the wax base, weigh out 7 grams of fragrance oil. Then stir with a metal utensil. I generally use a butter knife.

Now slowly pour all of the scented wax into the metal tin. If your wick shifts, don’t worry. You can easily reposition it after you’ve poured the wax.

Finally, allow the wax to cool completely then label, use or gift! The safety and caution label should go on the bottom of each candle. If desired, you can color in the labels with markers to give your candles a handmade touch or to express your own creativity. Be sure to trim your wick to 1/4″ high before every use and blow out the candle before dipping your fingers into the wax to avoid accidental burns from the flame. {Download the Printable Frosted Cranberry Massage Candle Labels and Candle Safety Labels here.}


Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.