Lush Inspired Massage Bar Recipe

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This Lush inspired massage bar recipe is so easy to make and only requires a few simple ingredients to create your own massage bars at home! This specific massage bar recipe was inspired by Lush’s Wiccy Magic Muscles Massage Bar.

This Lush inspired massage bar recipe is so easy to make and only requires a few simple ingredients. Inspired by Lush's Wiccy Magic Muscles Massage Bar, this massage bar recipe is made using a base of shea and cocoa butters, massaging organic Adzuki beans and a combination of cinnamon and peppermint essential oils for a warm, tingly sensation that helps to ease and soothe sore muscles.

Made using a base of shea and cocoa butters, this Lush inspired massage bar recipe also includes massaging organic adzuki beans and a combination of cinnamon leaf and peppermint essential oils for a warm, tingly sensation that helps to ease and soothe sore muscles. (Psst. These would also make a great homemade Mother’s Day gift! For more homemade Mother’s Day gift ideas, go here.)

Sensitive to some of the ingredients? Make a few simple substitutions. If you’re sensitive or allergic to shea butter, simply swap it out with sal butter. In addition, mango butter can be substituted for cocoa butter. And for those who find cinnamon leaf essential oil irritating, try either chili seed or fresh ginger essential oil instead!

This Lush inspired massage bar recipe is so easy to make and only requires a few simple ingredients. Inspired by Lush's Wiccy Magic Muscles Massage Bar, this massage bar recipe is made using a base of shea and cocoa butters, massaging organic Adzuki beans and a combination of cinnamon and peppermint essential oils for a warm, tingly sensation that helps to ease and soothe sore muscles.

Lush Inspired Massage Bar Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

3.5 oz. cocoa butter OR mango butter
1 oz. shea butter OR sal butter
1 oz. organic adzuki beans
1 mL cinnamon leaf essential oil OR fresh ginger essential oil OR chili seed essential oil
1.5 mL peppermint essential oil

Instructions:

Using a digital scale, weigh out the cocoa butter and shea (or sal) butter into a double boiler. Heat until melted then remove from heat.

Weigh out the adzuki beans and set aside.

Once the butter mixture begins cooling and starts to look cloudy, measure out the essential oils using graduated transfer pipettes and stir into the butter mixture. (If you prefer a fragrance oil over essential oils, use 2.5 mL of your favorite skin safe fragrance oil for a light scent or up to double for a stronger scent.)

Now pour the cooling butters evenly into two mold cavities of this Ozera 6-Cavity Silicone Soap Mold.

Evenly divide the adzuki beans into each of the two mold cavities you just poured the melted butters into and gently mix with a utensil.

Allow your massage bars to finish solidifying. You can speed up this process by popping the mold into your fridge.

This Lush inspired massage bar recipe is so easy to make and only requires a few simple ingredients. Inspired by Lush's Wiccy Magic Muscles Massage Bar, this massage bar recipe is made using a base of shea and cocoa butters, massaging organic Adzuki beans and a combination of cinnamon and peppermint essential oils for a warm, tingly sensation that helps to ease and soothe sore muscles.

Once your massage bars have fully solidified, simply remove from the mold cavities and package or use immediately.

As this Lush inspired massage bar recipe creates a massage bar that easily melts on body contact, you will need to keep your massage bars stored in a temperature controlled location away from heat.

To use, simply massage the bars onto your skin.

For more homemade skin care recipes that contain sal butter, go here. You can also find even more homemade skin care recipes on my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest. Or simply follow me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.

Sal Butter Sugar Scrub Recipe

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

This natural sal butter sugar scrub recipe is perfect for those looking for a skin nourishing scrub but are sensitive or allergic to shea butter. It also contains healing neem oil and is naturally colored and scented.

This natural sal butter sugar scrub recipe creates a natural, nourishing scrub suited for those sensitive to or allergic to shea butter. It also contains healing neem oil and coconut oil and is naturally colored and scented.

I scented my sal butter sugar scrub recipe with lemongrass essential oil for its fresh, energizing fragrance and used a pinch of turmeric to give my scrub a lovely yellow tint.

Why sal butter?

Apparently, as I’ve discovered, people with latex allergies and sensitivities are often also allergic to shea butter. Sal butter makes a wonderful substitution. Like shea butter, sal butter is a superb moisturizer and is believed to help with various skin disorders such as acne, eczema and psoriasis. It can also help to reduce skin inflammation. And unlike shea, it stays smooth and creamy, never grainy.

Why neem oil?

Neem oil is a carrier oil that I’ve found to have significant healing properties and many applications for use in both skin care and hair care products. Used both medicinally and cosmetically for hundreds of years, neem oil is naturally anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal and possesses moisturizing and regenerative properties. In addition it also has anti-inflammatory and analgesic (pain killing) properties and contains both vitamin E and essential fatty acids.

First used in India in 2000-4000BC, neem oil is a key herb used in Ayurvedic and Unani medicine. Neem oil is commonly used topically to treat rheumatism, eczema, ringworm, athlete’s foot, cold sores, psoriasis, warts, chronic syphilitic sores, infected burn wounds, and slow-healing skin ulcers. It has also been show to help control various skin infections including scabies and candida.

Natural Sal Butter Sugar Scrub Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

2 oz. sal butter
1.5 oz. refined coconut oil
1 oz. cocoa butter
.25 oz. neem oil
10.25 oz. granulated white sugar
.05 oz. – .1 oz.  lemongrass essential oil to suit (or .15 oz. fragrance oil)
pinch of turmeric to suit

 Instructions:

Using a digital scale begin by weighing out the cocoa butter and sal butter. Heat in either a double boiler or in a large glass Pyrex measuring cup at reduced power in a microwave until melted.

Next, weigh out the coconut oil and stir into the melted butters until it melts.

Weigh out and stir in the neem oil and essential oil.

Weigh the sugar, then slowly pour the sugar into the melted oil and butters, mixing with a fork as you go, until all the sugar is completely incorporated. Add a pinch of turmeric, if desired, for color. Mix well until the color evens out.

Now simply scoop your sugar scrub into your container(s) of choice. (Mine is pictured in a an 8 oz. plastic (BPA free) low profile jar. My sal butter sugar scrub recipe will fill approximately three of these if the recipe is doubled.)

This foaming salt scrub recipe is super easy to make and can be customized with your favorite scent! Just melt, pour and mix ingredients for a foaming salt scrub that gently exfoliates as it lathers and cleanses like soap!

For even more skin care recipes that contain sal butter be sure to check out my foaming salt scrub recipe, my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe, and my simple two-ingredient body butter recipe. For recipes that contain neem oil, view my neem oil recipe archive here. For more sugar scrub recipes, go here.

Discover even more homemade skin care recipes on my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest. You can also find and follow me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.

Pink Salt and Sal Butter Soap Recipe

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

This homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains a high percentage of skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt that promotes healing aids in detoxing and nourishing skin.

This homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains a high percentage of skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt that promotes healing and aids in detoxing and nourishing skin.

As people with latex allergies and sensitivities are often also allergic to shea butter, I wanted to create an alternative to a homemade shea butter soap. Sal butter, like shea butter, is a superb moisturizer and is believed to help with various skin disorders such as acne, eczema and psoriasis. It can also help to reduce skin inflammation.

Sal butter makes up 11.11% of this sal butter soap recipe. Coconut oil was used at 30.56%. I used a higher percentage of sal butter and a 10% superfat in my homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe to counteract both the higher percentage of coconut oil used (for lather) as well as to add moisturizing properties to the soap. The pink Himalayan salt, used at 22.22% of this soap recipe, aids skin in eliminating toxins, balancing the body’s pH, and increasing circulation.

In addition, my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe is palm free. (Learn more about the use of palm oil in soapmaking and discover more of my palm free homemade soap recipes here.)

This pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt to detox, promote healing and nourish skin.

Pink Salt and Sal Butter Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

2 oz. sal butter
4.5 oz. safflower oil
5.5 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
1 oz. castor oil
5 oz. olive oil

5.9 oz. distilled water
2.4 oz. lye (sodium hydroxide)

1 oz. fragrance oil, of choice
4 oz. pink Himalayan salt

This pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt to detox, promote healing and nourish skin.

Instructions:

My pink salt and sal butter soap recipe is half the size of my usual homemade soap recipes. I used this 6-cavity silicone soap mold for this recipe. This soap recipe will require two of these silicone molds and will yield approximately seven bars of soap. If you prefer to use the DIY wooden loaf soap mold I typically use for my recipes, simply double the recipe’s ingredients and run it back through a lye calculator. (Amounts and percentages are pictured above in my screenshot from SoapCalc so you can re-size this soap recipe as needed.) Should you choose not to include salt when you make this soap, then you will likely want to either reduce the % of water used in the recipe to about 30% and/or add .25 oz. of sodium lactate to the recipe for a harder bar.

You will need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking method instructions when making this homemade soap. This soapmaking tutorial also contains information on how to resize a soap recipe as well as how to determine the amount of soap needed for your mold. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe to get you started.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the soapmaking oils and sal butter using your digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until all the oils have melted, then remove from heat and set aside to cool.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to 90°F to 100°F you’re ready to make soap. (If you’re using a fragrance oil known to accelerate trace, then you will want to soap at a cooler temperature.)

Slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach a light trace, then weigh out and add the pink Himalayan salt and fragrance oil. (I used a lemon verbena fragrance oil for my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe since it’s so spring-y!) Use the stick blender to thoroughly combine the new additions with your soap batter and continue mixing until the soap reaches a medium to full trace. Now pour your soap into your mold(s) or mold cavities.

If you want your soap to gel, cover and insulate your soap. (I mixed my soap at cooler temps and lightly covered my soap mold with plastic wrap. My soap did not gel.)

Wait 24 hours, then unmold your soap. If your soap did not gel or is still soft, you may need to wait 2-3 days to cleanly unmold your soap from the silicone mold(s). Or, you can freeze your soap to remove it from the mold early if needed. Your soap should harden up in a few days.

If you used a loaf mold, you can now cut your soap into bars. If you used the 6-cavity silicone soap molds, your soap bars only need to cure as no cutting is needed unless you want to make smaller guest sized soaps.

Allow your soaps to cure 4-6 weeks before use. Then package and label as desired. If you are planning to sell your pink salt and sal butter soaps, be sure to include the weight of your soaps on each bar and avoid making any medical claims about your soaps to meet FDA guidelines.

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

If you like my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe, then you may also like my luxury double butter soap recipe. My luxury double butter soap recipe contains high percentages of both cocoa and shea butters making it perfect for anyone who suffers from dry skin. The recipe comes in both palm and palm free versions. You can find both of my luxury double butter soap recipes here.

Want to learn how to create your own custom cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator? See my tutorial on creating cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking and DIY Bath and Body boards on Pinterest. Or keep up with all of my new homemade soap, bath and beauty recipes by following me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

My son, like me, suffers from dry skin in the winter and asked if I could make him a really moisturizing soap for his skin. In the end I settled on a high conditioning/low cleansing double butter soap recipe made with 20% cocoa butter, 10% shea butter, and an 8% superfat. I also added corn silk powder to my recipe for it’s gentle exfoliating properties and a silky feel. And, to help curb potential skin issues, I also included a small amount of neem oil in the recipe as well.

My son’s other request for this homemade soap was that it make him “smell like a man.” So I scented it with a mahogany teakwood fragrance oil. Fragrance however, is optional, and you can either leave this double butter soap recipe unscented when you make yours or use a fragrance oil of your choice instead.

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

Before you get started on my luxury double butter soap recipe, there are a few things you should know. One, this soap recipe is NOT recommended for beginners. This soap moves really quickly and there’s a good chance it can and will seize up on you. Therefore you should soap at as low a temperature as possible and you may want to mix this one by hand. Should you use a stick blender, be prepared for this soap to basically act like you’re making it using the hot process soapmaking method should it seize.

If and when it does seize on you, simply wait for it to gel. (It will look translucent when it does this.) Then continue mixing if needed and pour (spoon) into your mold at this point. You can also wait for it to hit gel stage if you like before adding your fragrance. Unlike hot process soap however, you won’t need to add heat once you mix the oils, butter and lye-water as it’s going to heat up on its own and do all the work for you.

Two, I’m providing two separate soap recipe options for this double butter soap recipe – one with palm oil and one without – so that the final bars are as similar in properties as possible. I made mine with palm oil as I still have leftover palm oil I’m trying to use up. Palm oil can and will speed up trace and can contribute to the soap seizing. However, should you decide not to use palm oil, it may slow things down a bit for you. (Learn more about using palm oil and find more of my palm free cold process soap recipes here.)

Three, the neem oil in my double butter soap recipe is completely optional but I do highly recommend it. Probably my favorite carrier oil, neem oil is a common ingredient in skin and hair care products and is often used to treat problematic skin conditions including eczema and rosacea. It’s a moisturizing oil with regenerative properties and its naturally rich in vitamin E and essential fatty acids. It is also anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-fungal. While neem oil, as a stand alone product, has a strong odor, this scent is easily masked with natural essential oils or fragrance oils. (Click here to find more of my skin care recipes that contain neem oil.)

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (with Palm Oil)

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7.2 oz. cocoa butter
3.6 oz. shea butter
5.4 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
10.8 oz. olive oil
1.8 oz. castor oil
5.4 oz. palm oil
1.8 oz. palm kernel flakes
.25 oz. 100% neem oil, optional

 11.5 oz. distilled water
4.8 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

2 oz. – 2.5 oz. fragrance oil, optional
1 Tablespoon (60% solution) sodium lactate, optional
1 Tablespoon corn silk powder, optional

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (with Palm Oil)

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (Palm Free)

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7.2 oz. cocoa butter
3.6 oz. shea butter
7.2 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
10.8 oz. olive oil
1.8 oz. castor oil
5.4 oz. lard
.25 oz. 100% neem oil, optional

 11.5 oz. distilled water
4.8 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

2 oz. – 2.5 oz. fragrance oil, optional
1 Tablespoon (60% solution) sodium lactate, optional
1 Tablespoon corn silk powder, optional

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (Palm Free)

Instructions:

Both of these luxury double butter soap recipes will fit into one of my DIY wooden loaf soap molds and will yield approximately 10-12 bars depending on how thick you cut them.

You’ll need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking method instructions when making this homemade soap. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe to get you started. This is not a good soap recipe for beginner soapmakers.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Choose the double butter soap recipe you’d like to make, then begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the soapmaking oils using your digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until all the oils have melted, then remove from heat and set aside to cool.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to 85°F to 90°F – or room temp if it’s within your experience and comfort level – you’re ready to make soap.

Start by measuring out the corn silk powder with a measuring spoon and add to your melted soapmaking oils. Use a stick blender to combine until the soapmaking oils are free of clumps and the corn silk powder has been evenly distributed. As there’s the likelihood this soap may potentially seize, you may want to weigh out the fragrance oil and add it at this time as well rather than waiting til trace. Alternately, it can be added after the soap gels.

Now measure out the liquid sodium lactate and stir it into the lye-water. (Sodium lactate is used to make a harder bar of soap.)

Next, slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace. If the soap seizes, be patient. Wait for the soap to gel, then mix again and pour (or spoon) into your mold. Leave the soap uncovered overnight.

You should be able to unmold your soap the next day.

Once you’ve removed your soap from the mold, cut into bars then allow to cure 4-6 weeks before use.

Want to learn how to create your own custom cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator? See my tutorial on creating cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking and DIY Bath and Body boards on Pinterest. Or keep up with all of my new homemade soap, bath and beauty recipes by following me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.

Yummy Raspberry Lemonade Sugar Scrub Recipe

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

Yummy Raspberry Lemonade Sugar Scrub Recipe with Coconut Oil - So easy to make and a wonderful natural moisturizer!

What’s better on a hot summer day than a glass of lemonade? Why this yummy homemade raspberry lemonade sugar scrub recipe of course! It’s so easy to make and and contains nature’s natural moisturizer, coconut oil!

Yummy Scented Raspberry Lemonade Sugar Scrub Recipe with Coconut Oil

Raspberry Lemonade Sugar Scrub Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

4 oz. 76° melt point refined coconut oil
.5 oz. sesame oil
6 oz. white sugar
.3 oz. raspberry lemonade fragrance oil
pinch iron yellow oxide pigment powder, optional

Directions:

Weigh out the ingredients using a digital scale and combine in large glass bowl. Whip with a fork until all ingredients are combined then spoon into an 8 oz. container of your choice.

If you live in a colder climate you may need to melt or soften the coconut oil before mixing. Simply weigh it first and heat until partially melted in the microwave, then weigh and add the other ingredients.

If you choose to use 92° melt point coconut oil – what they sell for cooking in grocery stores – you may need to decrease the amount of coconut oil slightly and increase the amount of sesame oil. You may also have some of the natural coconut smell come through in the end product as it’s generally unrefined so it still has it’s natural scent.

Why sesame and coconut oils?

Both sesame oil and coconut oil are two of nature’s great moisturizers. In addition to their moisturizing properties, they also offer a protective layer in products to help skin retain moisture. This makes them a great choice for dry skin. Coconut oil is also suitable for those who have skin sensitivities and is widely used throughout the soapmaking and cosmetics industry for this reason.

To learn more about the benefits of coconut oil I recommend the book, Coconut Oil: For Health and Beauty by Cynthia Holzapfel and Laura Holzapfel.

For more homemade skin care, bath, body and beauty recipes be sure to follow my DIY Bath & Body Board on Pinterest. You can also find more of my bath and beauty recipes by following me on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Blog Lovin’ and Instagram!