Yogurt & Banana Soap Recipe with Organic Flax Seed Oil

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



 

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin with real banana powder and yogurt. It's made using the cold process soapmaking method with the end product yielding a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It’s made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Banana powder, made from 100% banana, is rich in both potassium and vitamin A. It’s great for those suffering from dry skin and you can even use the leftover banana powder mixed with water or milk to create a rich, moisturizing facial mask. It’s used in place of real banana in this recipe along with skin soothing yogurt powder.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe also contains organic flax seed oil. As flax seed oil tends to have a shorter shelf life, a 5% usage rate is recommended for cold process soap. Flax seed oil is an emollient that is high in essential fatty acids, vitamin E, vitamin B and minerals.

It contains the alpha-linoleic acids believed to contribute to younger looking skin. Suitable for even sensitive skin, this soothing carrier oil is found in skin care products and cosmetics that claim to help improve skin’s elasticity and reduce the appearance of cellulite.

If you’re interested in making banana soap from ripe bananas rather than a powder, you can find my oatmeal banana soap recipe made with ripe bananas here. In addition I also have two yogurt soap recipes made using fresh yogurt. I have a homemade yogurt soap recipe with chamomile here and a simple 3-oil yogurt & avocado soap recipe here.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Yogurt & Banana Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

1.6 oz. refined coconut oil
1.6 oz. castor oil
4.8 oz. babassu oil
3.2 oz. cocoa butter
17.6 oz. olive oil
1.6 oz. refined shea butter
1.6 oz. organic flax seed oil

9.75 oz. distilled water
4.25 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)
.4 oz. yogurt powder
.6 oz. banana powder
1.9 oz. fragrance oil, optional

Soap Notes:

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

I’ve included a screenshot from SoapCalc (above) to make resizing my yogurt & banana soap recipe easier. It also gives you an idea of the overall soap bar quality. (SoapCalc is great tool for anyone wanting to create their own custom soap recipes from scratch. You can learn how to create your own custom soap recipes using a lye calculator here.)

Because my yogurt & banana soap recipe is palm free, I did a steeper water discount than normal and included sodium lactate in the soap recipe to get a harder bar.

I used a coconut milk fragrance oil to scent my yogurt & banana soaps. You can use any fragrance oil of your choosing however, or simply omit it altogether.

I used two Crafter’s Choice basic round soap molds for this recipe. My yogurt & banana soap recipe yields about nine soap bars weighing around 5 oz. each.

Instructions:

You should be familiar with making cold process soap before trying this soap recipe. If you’ve never made cold process soap before – or any kind of soap in which you’re working with lye – I strongly recommend you start with a beginner soap recipe so you get a feel for the process and know you can create a successful soap. Otherwise, you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions to create this soap. You should adhere to all basic safety precautions when working with lye.

Begin by measuring out the amount of water called for in the recipe into a heat safe container. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye.

Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area. Stir the lye until it has dissolved, then set the lye-water aside.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking fats – these are all of the carrier oils and butters called for in my yogurt & banana soap recipe.

Heat until melted then set aside.

Allow the lye-water and the melted soapmaking oils to cool to around 95°F. Once they’ve reached this temperature, you’re ready to make soap.

Weigh out the sodium lactate and stir it into the cooled lye-water.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Then weigh out the yogurt and banana powders along with the fragrance oil, if desired. Add these ingredients to the melted oils and mix to combine with a stick/hand blender.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the melted oils.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace then evenly pour the yogurt & banana soap batter into the molds’ cavities. Cover if desired with plastic film or parchment paper and set aside in a safe location.

Remove the soap from your molds the next day or the day after depending on the hardness of the soap. If your soap doesn’t gel then you may need to wait an extra day or two before unmolding to get your yogurt & banana soaps to release cleanly from the molds.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin. It's made using real banana powder, yogurt powder and organic flax seed oil. Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, my yogurt & banana soap recipe yields a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

Allow your yogurt & banana soap bars to cure 4-6 weeks. Once your soaps have cured, they are ready for use. Simply wrap and label as desired for personal use or gifting. You can also bevel the edges with a potato peeler if desired.

If you’re planning to sell your yogurt & banana soaps, be sure to label them according to FDA guidelines. Not sure how to label your creations? I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

For even more of my soap recipes and tutorials, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board and my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts from Soap Deli News blog to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


DIY Donut Soap Made Using the Cold Process Soapmaking Method

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



If you love doughnuts but they don't love you, try making this DIY donut soap instead! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, these DIY donut soaps are formulated to be low cleansing/high conditioning bars. They're naturally colored with rose kaolin clay to mimic a "baked" pink donut and also contain watermelon fruit extract powder which is high in vitamin C and and amino acids that can help to promote rejuvenated looking skin.

If you love doughnuts but they don’t love you, try making this DIY donut soap instead! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, these DIY donut soaps are formulated to be high conditioning/low cleansing bars. They’re naturally colored with rose kaolin clay to mimic a “baked” pink donut and also contain watermelon fruit extract powder which is high in vitamin C and and amino acids that can help to promote rejuvenated looking skin.

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

In addition, this DIY donut soap recipe also contains skin conditioning camellia (tea seed) oil, babassu oil and mango seed butter. It’s then iced with a natural melt and pour soap base “donut glaze” and topped with real candy sprinkles! Keep reading to learn how to make your own DIY donut soap!

If you love doughnuts but they don't love you, try making this DIY donut soap instead! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, these DIY donut soaps are formulated to be low cleansing/high conditioning bars. They're naturally colored with rose kaolin clay to mimic a "baked" pink donut and also contain watermelon fruit extract powder which is high in vitamin C and and amino acids that can help to promote rejuvenated looking skin.

DIY Donut Soap

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

4.8 oz. mango butter
1.6 oz. castor oil
3.2 oz. babassu oil
7.35 oz. olive oil
6.4 oz. sesame oil
3.85 oz. coconut oil
4.8 oz. camellia oil

9.75 oz. distilled water
4.25 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)
.25 oz. (about 2 Tbs.) rose kaolin clay
.6 oz (about 2 Tbs.) watermelon fruit extract powder
1.7 oz. fragrance oil

Soap Notes:

DIY Donut Soap Recipe made using the cold process soapmaking method.

I’ve included a screenshot from SoapCalc (above) to make resizing the recipe for my DIY donut soap easier and so you have an idea of the overall soap bar quality. (SoapCalc is great tool for anyone wanting to create their own custom soap recipes from scratch. You can learn how to create your own custom soap recipes using a lye calculator here.)

Because my DIY donut soap is palm free, I did a steeper water discount than normal and included sodium lactate in the soap recipe to get a harder bar.

I used a sparkling limoncello fragrance oil for my donut soaps. You can use any fragrance oil of your choosing, however, be aware that if it contains vanilla, your donut soaps will turn brown.

My DIY donut soap recipe yields a baker’s dozen or 13 donut soaps.

I used this 2 pack of silicone donut molds that my boyfriend gifted me for Valentine’s Day to make these soap donuts.

Instructions:

You should be familiar with making cold process soap before trying this soap recipe. If you’ve never made cold process soap before – or any kind of soap in which you’re working with lye – I strongly recommend you start with a beginner soap recipe so you get a feel for the process and know you can create a successful soap. Otherwise, you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions to create your DIY donut soap. You should adhere to all basic safety precautions when working with lye.

Begin by measuring out the amount of water called for in the recipe into a heat safe container. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye.

Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area. Stir the lye until it has dissolved, then set the lye-water aside.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking fats – these are all of the oils and the mango butter called for in the recipe.

Heat until melted then set aside.

Allow the lye-water and the melted soapmaking oils to cool to around 95°F. Once they’ve reached this temperature, you’re ready to make soap.

Weigh out the sodium lactate and stir it into the cooled lye-water.

Then weigh out the clay, watermelon fruit powder and fragrance oil. Add these ingredients to the melted oils and mix to combine with a stick/hand blender.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the melted oils.

Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace then evenly pour the donut soap batter into the molds’ cavities. Cover if desired with plastic film or parchment paper and set aside in a safe location.

Remove the soap from your molds the next day or the day after depending on the hardness of the soap donuts. If your soap doesn’t gel then you may need to wait an extra day or two before unmolding to get your DIY donut soap to release cleanly from the molds.

Allow your donut soaps to cure 4-6 weeks. Once your soaps have cured, your ready to add the icing and sprinkles!

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

To create your soap icing you’ll need a clear melt and pour soap base. I specifically used Crafter’s Choice detergent free hemp melt and pour soap base. Cut up several ounces of the soap base into squares and melt in the microwave in 30 second increments until melted.

Next add your desired colorant for the soap glaze. I used Nurture Soap’s vibrant yellow mica. Stir in desired amount – I recommend about a quarter teaspoon – and scent if desired.

Allow the soap glaze to cool slightly. Just before it starts to solidify, you’re ready to apply the glaze.

Dip your first soap donut, top down, into the soap icing donut glaze. Turn over and place onto a cutting board or other workable surface. Immediately add candy sprinkles of your choice.

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

Repeat this process with all of the donut soaps one at time, until you’ve decorated all of your donut soaps.

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

If you prefer to add soap icing rather than a glaze to your soap donuts, simply add more colorant to the clear melt and pour soap base, allow to cool but not solidify, then drizzle as desired across each of the soaps.

This DIY donut soap is made using the cold process soapmaking method. It's palm free and is formulated to create a high conditioning/low cleansing soap.

You’ve now made your own DIY donut soap! All that’s left is to wrap and label your soaps as desired for personal use or gifting. (These make fantastic party favors!) If you’re planning to sell your homemade donut soaps, be sure to label them according to FDA guidelines. Not sure how to label your creations? I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

For even more of my soap recipes and tutorials, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board and my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts from Soap Deli News blog to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Palm Free Olive and Babassu Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin!

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it’s simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

My boyfriend, James, recently wanted me to teach him to make soap. Let me begin by saying, I’m kind of a crappy teacher. The whole “instructing” thing makes me nervous which in turn makes me impatient and, as such, I come off a wee bit snippy. This is one of the primary reasons I “teach” via my blog. My friends, however, understand my quirks so it’s different with them. However, we are also kind of bad in that we let the wine flow freely while we’re crafting. So, well, um. That’s why I’m always smiling in those photos that may or may not be on instagram. Ha ha.

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

James is wonderful, and super crazy smart, so I was able to rush through all of the explanations on the chemistry of this soap and not feel like a jerk. When we got to the part where he asked when he could actually USE the soap, however, is where things fell apart. He was rather miffed he had to wait four weeks. I told him that in the meantime he could just make me cookies. Luckily he stays super busy like me. Otherwise I’d have a constant soapmaking companion encouraging me to rush unmolding my soap loaves.

Anyhow, if you’ve never ever made cold process soap before, then you should first check out my tutorial on how to make cold process soap from scratch. You may even want to watch a few YouTube videos to give you a feel for the process, but it’s not necessary. Once you’re ready, here’s the recipe!

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Palm Free Olive and Babassu Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

2.4 oz. babassu oil
12.8 oz. olive oil
.8 oz. castor oil

4.8 oz. distilled water
2.1 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 teaspoon (60% solution) sodium lactate
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8th teaspoon ultramarine blue pigment powder, optional
1 oz. Sea Salt & Driftwood fragrance oil, optional

Soap Notes:

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin.

For starters, or rather, here are some changes I would make a second time around… If you don’t let this soap recipe gel, it’s going to be soft for a bit and will take several days to unmold. I’d definitely either increase the sodium lactate to 1 Tablespoon and/or reduce the water as percent of the oil weight to 28%.

In addition, I have noted on the screenshot I took of my olive and babassu soap recipe (on SoapCalc) to use 1/4 teaspoon of pigment powder. I ended up using less as reflected in my recipe above. This gave my soap a nice baby blue color that I felt went will with the fragrance oil I chose.

The Sea Salt & Driftwood fragrance oil is a nice scent. James and I feel like it’s pretty unisex and it didn’t make me sneeze.

However, both the fragrance and the pigment powder are optional. The sugar is to help boost the bubbles a bit but you can omit it if you like.

You shouldn’t have any surprises with my olive and babassu soap recipe as indicated or with this specific fragrance oil even if you’re a beginner.

And then there’s the coarse sea salt on top…

This natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe is made using Australian black clay and fine sea salt for a luxurious spa like experience in the shower!

As my fragrance oil and color theme was kind of ocean-y, I figured I’d decorate the top with sea salt. I’ve done this many times in the past with cold process loaf soaps. For example, my natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe (pictured above.) However, it didn’t work so well for the type of mold I used this time and I had to get creative in the end. So you can either, a) omit the coarse sea salt on top for smooth, even bars or b) take your soap to art class. (I’ll tell you what I did to mine further down.)

I used this Ozera 6-Cavity Silicone Soap Mold for my olive and babassu soap recipe.

Instructions:

Taking all safety precautions you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking method to create my olive and babassu soap recipe.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water into a heat safe container.

Then, using a digital scale, weigh out the amount of lye needed.

Stir until the lye has dissolved completely, then set aside to cool.

Next, use your digital scale to weigh out the babassu, castor and olive oils. Heat in a non-aluminum pot over medium to medium-low heat on the stove until your ingredients have melted completely.

Once your ingredients have melted, remove from heat and set aside.

Allow the lye-water and your soapmaking oils to cool to between 90°F-100°F.

Once your ingredients have cooled, use a measuring spoon to measure out the sodium lactate as well as the sugar then stir into your lye water.

If you are using a pigment powder to color your soap, measure out the pigment and stir into the melted oils with a stick blender.

Now pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils and mix until you reach a light trace. Add your fragrance oil at this point if you have chosen to scent your soap and mix again.

Once your soap traces again, pour the soap batter into all six of the rectangle cavities of your silicone soap mold. (If you think you’ll need to move your soap, be sure to place the mold on a cutting board before you pour your soap for easy transfer.)

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Set your soap aside to complete the saponification process. You can check the soap 24-48 hours later to see if it’s ready to be unmolded. If it’s not, simply wait another day or two. There’s no rush. I mean, because James will tell you, you have to wait FOUR WEEKS too use it anyway and apparently that’s just INSANE. Ha!

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Once you’ve unmolded your soaps, set them aside in a cool, dry location to finish curing four to six weeks.

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

Now, if you did a crazy experiment on the tops of your soap bars, it’s highly likely it can be fixed. My coarse salt on the tops of my bars kept falling off. And if I took the salt, off the soap just looked bizarre. So I improvised.

This palm free olive and babassu soap recipe is easy enough for beginners and requires only three soapmaking oils! Formulated to be low cleansing and extra conditioning, this olive and babassu soap recipe is perfect for winter or year round for anyone who suffers from dry skin. Plus, it's simple enough that even beginning soapmakers can give this homemade soap recipe a whirl!

I simply sprinkled fine cosmetic glitter on top of my soap bars where the salt was. I then scented and tinted clear natural melt and pour soap base and drizzled over the tops of my bars, covering the salt. Not only does the salt now dissolve as you use the soap, but it kind of looks neat. Plus there’s no right or wrong way to do it. After all, they are YOUR art bars!

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

Plus I screwed up way less on this soaping gaffe than I did when I made my tea tree and sea mud soap recipe. You won’t believe how horrendous this soap looked before the fix. (You can check out the before and after transformation here.)

If you liked my palm free olive and babassu soap recipe then be sure to check out my other cold process soap recipes here. In addition you can also find more of my homemade soap recipes on my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board as well my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board.

Not ready to make my olive and babassu soap recipe? Try a homemade babassu soap sample set from Elegant Rose Boutique on Etsy! Her babassu soaps are made using only babassu, castor, apricot kernel and jojoba oils. As they don’t contain any coconut, palm or olive oil, they are great for those with sensitivities. For more of my favorites on Etsy, check out my Etsy collections here.

Simple Natural Soapmaking by Jan Berry includes recipes for Blue Agave Soap, Wild Rosehips Soap, Double Mint Sage Soap and Dead Sea Mud Spa Bar. The recipes are in tune with today’s trends―such as vegan options, shampoo and shaving bars, seasonal soaps such as Pumpkin Spice Soap and soaps highlighting popular ingredients such as goat’s milk and sea salt―while still retaining a rustic, old-fashioned feel.

Also be sure to keep your eyes peeled for a new soapmaking book by Jan Berry in August! Jan, a fellow blogger, is the author of The Nerdy Farm Wife blog, as well as the book, 101 Easy Homemade Products for Your Skin, Health & Home. Her new book, Simple Natural Soapmaking, will be released August 8th, and is available for pre-order now.

Sample recipes include Blue Agave Soap, Wild Rosehips Soap, Double Mint Sage Soap and Dead Sea Mud Spa Bar. The recipes are in tune with today’s trends―such as vegan options, shampoo and shaving bars, seasonal soaps such as Pumpkin Spice Soap and soaps highlighting popular ingredients such as goat’s milk and sea salt―while still retaining a rustic, old-fashioned feel.

And don’t forget to find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. You can sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Coffee and Cocoa Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it’s palm free!

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Since making homemade coffee soap in 2015, I’ve been dying to make another. My homemade coffee soap recipe was, and still is, one of my most favorite homemade soap recipes of all time. This time around I also wanted to add cocoa powder for a coffee and cocoa soap recipe. At the last minute, and probably because I was craving brownies at the time, I decided to add a whole egg to this recipe as well.

In the same year I formulated my coffee soap recipe, I also made my first egg soap! Also making my list of favorite soap recipes of all time, my homemade egg soap recipe calls for two egg yolks. So I figured I’d mix it up a bit this go round and simply used an entire egg!

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Why egg?

Well, eggs are believed to offer skin care benefits that include tightening skin, shrinking pores, and calming redness and breakouts. In cold process soap, egg yolks are treated as a fat. As such they help to give egg soap a rich, thick lather. Egg whites, on the other hand, contain no fat whatsoever. However, they do contain protein which has an astringent effect on skin.

Want to make your own? Here’s how!

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Coffee and Cocoa Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

3 oz. babassu oil
1 oz. castor oil
2 oz. unrefined cocoa butter
2 oz. refined coconut oil
10 oz. olive oil
2 oz. safflower oil

6.6 oz. strong brewed coffee
2.7 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

1 Tablespoon + 1 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder
1 egg, tempered
1 Tablespoon (60% solution) sodium lactate
1.25 oz. fragrance oil, optional

Soap Notes:

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

For my original coffee and cocoa soap recipe, as stated previously, I had not intended on using egg. As it was a last minute addition, and this recipe has a high percentage of olive oil, you may want to reduce the amount of coffee (as percentage of oil weight) to 30% (6 oz.) Definitely do this if you are preventing your soaps from going through gel phase. Otherwise you will probably need an extra day or two to unmold these cleanly. It does firm up nice once unmolding though.

In addition, if you are using a fragrance oil – I did not – definitely reduce the amount of coffee. A hot fudge brownie fragrance oil would blend nicely with this soap as would a coffee or chocolate fragrance oil. Or perhaps chocolate cappuccino or chocolate cream cupcake?

Without a fragrance oil the chocolate smell really starts to come through after about a week. It smells a little weird until then, but don’t worry. It’ll smell fantastic regardless of whether or not you choose to use a fragrance.

To make my coffee that is used in place of the water in this recipe, I brewed 4 rounded Tablespoons in just over the amount of water called for in the recipe. (As we all know, those grounds can be greedy and some of the water content stays trapped in them.) I won’t lie and say I didn’t use a mocha latte flavored coffee because I totally did. Regular coffee would work just fine though.

Also, a nice substitution for the unrefined cocoa butter in this recipe would be dark cocoa butter wafers. In this instance you could omit the cocoa powder entirely, or leave it in to make it extra chocolatey!

In addition, your egg will need to be room temperature to use in my coffee and cocoa soap recipe. So you may want to remove it from the refrigerator several hours before you intend to make this soap. You’ll also want to make your coffee ahead of time so it has time to cool to room temperature as well.

Finally, I used the Crafter’s Choice basic round silicone soap mold for this recipe. But you can adapt the recipe to fit your own mold if you like.

(For information on the properties of my coffee and cocoa soap recipe as well as percentages and superfat used, simply refer to the screenshot of this recipe from SoapCalc above.)

Instructions:

Ready? Let’s get started!

You do need to be familiar with making cold process soap for this recipe. You’ll follow my basic cold process soapmaking instructions. If you’ve never made cold process soap before – or any kind of soap in which you’re working with lye – I strongly recommend you start with a beginner soap recipe so you get a feel for the process and know you can create a successful soap.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

You’ll begin by mixing your lye-water. Or, in this case, lye-coffee.

Measure out the amount of (room temperature) coffee needed into a heat proof container.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Then, using a digital scale, weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the coffee in a well ventilated area, stirring until the lye has dissolved completely. (You’ll want to take proper safety precautions when working with lye. Gloves and eye protection are recommended.)

Set the lye-coffee aside to cool.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Next, use your digital scale to weigh out the cocoa butter and soapmaking oils. Heat in a non-aluminum pot over medium to medium-low on the stove until your ingredients have melted completely. Alternately, you can also heat them at 50% power in your microwave in a large glass Pyrex measuring cup until the cocoa butter has melted.

Once your ingredients have melted, remove from heat and set aside.

Allow the lye-coffee and your butter-oil mixture to cool to room temperature or around 76°F.

Using a measuring spoon, measure out the sodium lactate and stir it into your lye-coffee.

Now temper your egg. To do this, remove about a cup of oil from your soapmaking oils. Whisk the entire egg (no shell, of course) into the oils.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Using measuring spoons, measure out the unsweetened cocoa powder. Use a stick blender to incorporate the cocoa powder into the oils.

Return the oil with the egg mixed into it, to this container and mix again briefly.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Now pour the lye-coffee into the oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace. Please note that my coffee and cocoa soap recipe does take a while to trace.

If you’re using a fragrance oil, add it at light trace and keep mixing until the soap batter is like a light pudding.

Pour the soap batter into all six of the mold’s cavities so each is filled. Then go back and circle any remaining soap on top of the soap you just poured.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

If desired, you can add whole coffee beans or another decorative element or soap embed to the top of each of your soaps as an accent.

Allow your soap to set up for at least 48 hours before unmolding. If your soap doesn’t seem like it’s going to come out of the mold easily – especially if it didn’t gel – you can place the mold in the freezer for about a half hour or simply wait an extra day or two. (This mold is thicker than a lot of other silicone molds and therefore it can be more difficult to push the soap out cleanly.)

This homemade coffee and cocoa soap recipe is made with fresh strong brewed coffee, unsweetened cocoa powder and an entire egg for a luxurious feeling soap with a rich, thick lather. Plus it's palm free! Learn how to make it now at Soap Deli News blog.

Because it’s winter and much colder in my house right now, I got soda ash on the tops of my soaps. However, I loved the contrast between the color of the soda ash and the color of the soap and the coffee beans so I left it on my soaps. If you don’t like the way it looks, you can simply steam or wash it off.

Allow to cure four to six weeks before using.

Don’t have time to make my coffee and cocoa soap recipe? Be sure to check out my check out my favorite coffee and chocolate themed artisan products on Etsy for homemade coffee and cocoa soaps you can buy! Or try Starboard Soap Co.’s Farm Fresh Egg Soap.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking board as well my DIY Bath and Body board on Pinterest. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Pink Salt and Sal Butter Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains a high percentage of skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt that aids in detoxing, healing and nourishing skin.

This homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains a high percentage of skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt that aids in detoxing, healing and nourishing skin.

As people with latex allergies and sensitivities are often also allergic to shea butter, I wanted to create an alternative to a homemade shea butter soap. Sal butter, like shea butter, is a superb moisturizer and is believed to help with various skin disorders such as acne, eczema and psoriasis. It can also help to reduce skin inflammation.

Sal butter makes up 11.11% of this sal butter soap recipe. Coconut oil was used at 30.56%. I used a higher percentage of sal butter and a 10% superfat in my homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe to counteract both the higher percentage of coconut oil used (for lather) as well as to add moisturizing properties to the soap. The pink Himalayan salt, used at 22.22% of this soap recipe, aids skin in eliminating toxins, balancing the body’s pH, and increasing circulation.

In addition, my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe is palm free. (Learn more about the use of palm oil in soapmaking and discover more of my palm free homemade soap recipes here.)

This homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains a high percentage of skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt that aids in detoxing, healing and nourishing skin.

Pink Salt and Sal Butter Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

2 oz. sal butter
4.5 oz. safflower oil
5.5 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
1 oz. castor oil
5 oz. olive oil

5.9 oz. distilled water
2.4 oz. lye (sodium hydroxide)

1 oz. fragrance oil, of choice
4 oz. pink Himalayan salt

This pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt to detox, heal and nourish skin.

Instructions:

My pink salt and sal butter soap recipe is half the size of my usual homemade soap recipes. I used this 6-cavity silicone soap mold for this recipe. This soap recipe will require two of these silicone molds and will yield approximately seven bars of soap. If you prefer to use the DIY wooden loaf soap mold I typically use for my recipes, simply double the recipe’s ingredients and run it back through a lye calculator. (Amounts and percentages are pictured above in my screenshot from SoapCalc so you can re-size this soap recipe as needed.) Should you choose not to include salt when you make this soap, then you will likely want to either reduce the % of water used in the recipe to about 30% and/or add .25 oz. of sodium lactate to the recipe for a harder bar.

You will need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking method instructions when making this homemade soap. This soapmaking tutorial also contains information on how to resize a soap recipe as well as how to determine the amount of soap needed for your mold. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe to get you started.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the soapmaking oils and sal butter using your digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until all the oils have melted, then remove from heat and set aside to cool.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to 90°F to 100°F you’re ready to make soap. (If you’re using a fragrance oil known to accelerate trace, then you will want to soap at a cooler temperature.)

Slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach a light trace, then weigh out and add the pink Himalayan salt and fragrance oil. (I used a lemon verbena fragrance oil for my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe since it’s so spring-y!) Use the stick blender to thoroughly combine the new additions with your soap batter and continue mixing until the soap reaches a medium to full trace. Now pour your soap into your mold(s) or mold cavities.

If you want your soap to gel, cover and insulate your soap. (I mixed my soap at cooler temps and lightly covered my soap mold with plastic wrap. My soap did not gel.)

Wait 24 hours, then unmold your soap. If your soap did not gel or is still soft, you may need to wait 2-3 days to cleanly unmold your soap from the silicone mold(s). Or, you can freeze your soap to remove it from the mold early if needed. Your soap should harden up in a few days.

If you used a loaf mold, you can now cut your soap into bars. If you used the 6-cavity silicone soap molds, your soap bars only need to cure as no cutting is needed unless you want to make smaller guest sized soaps.

Allow your soaps to cure 4-6 weeks before use. Then package and label as desired. If you are planning to sell your pink salt and sal butter soaps, be sure to include the weight of your soaps on each bar and avoid making any medical claims about your soaps to meet FDA guidelines.

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

If you like my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe, then you may also like my luxury double butter soap recipe. My luxury double butter soap recipe contains high percentages of both cocoa and shea butters making it perfect for anyone who suffers from dry skin. The recipe comes in both palm and palm free versions. You can find both of my luxury double butter soap recipes here.

Want to learn how to create your own custom cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator? See my tutorial on creating cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking and DIY Bath and Body boards on Pinterest. Or keep up with all of my new homemade soap, bath and beauty recipes by following me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.