Pink Salt and Sal Butter Soap Recipe

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This homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains a high percentage of skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt that promotes healing aids in detoxing and nourishing skin.

This homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains a high percentage of skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt that promotes healing and aids in detoxing and nourishing skin.

As people with latex allergies and sensitivities are often also allergic to shea butter, I wanted to create an alternative to a homemade shea butter soap. Sal butter, like shea butter, is a superb moisturizer and is believed to help with various skin disorders such as acne, eczema and psoriasis. It can also help to reduce skin inflammation.

Sal butter makes up 11.11% of this sal butter soap recipe. Coconut oil was used at 30.56%. I used a higher percentage of sal butter and a 10% superfat in my homemade pink salt and sal butter soap recipe to counteract both the higher percentage of coconut oil used (for lather) as well as to add moisturizing properties to the soap. The pink Himalayan salt, used at 22.22% of this soap recipe, aids skin in eliminating toxins, balancing the body’s pH, and increasing circulation.

In addition, my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe is palm free. (Learn more about the use of palm oil in soapmaking and discover more of my palm free homemade soap recipes here.)

This pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt to detox, promote healing and nourish skin.

Pink Salt and Sal Butter Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

2 oz. sal butter
4.5 oz. safflower oil
5.5 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
1 oz. castor oil
5 oz. olive oil

5.9 oz. distilled water
2.4 oz. lye (sodium hydroxide)

1 oz. fragrance oil, of choice
4 oz. pink Himalayan salt

This pink salt and sal butter soap recipe contains skin conditioning sal butter and mineral rich pink Himalayan salt to detox, promote healing and nourish skin.

Instructions:

My pink salt and sal butter soap recipe is half the size of my usual homemade soap recipes. I used this 6-cavity silicone soap mold for this recipe. This soap recipe will require two of these silicone molds and will yield approximately seven bars of soap. If you prefer to use the DIY wooden loaf soap mold I typically use for my recipes, simply double the recipe’s ingredients and run it back through a lye calculator. (Amounts and percentages are pictured above in my screenshot from SoapCalc so you can re-size this soap recipe as needed.) Should you choose not to include salt when you make this soap, then you will likely want to either reduce the % of water used in the recipe to about 30% and/or add .25 oz. of sodium lactate to the recipe for a harder bar.

You will need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking method instructions when making this homemade soap. This soapmaking tutorial also contains information on how to resize a soap recipe as well as how to determine the amount of soap needed for your mold. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe to get you started.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the soapmaking oils and sal butter using your digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until all the oils have melted, then remove from heat and set aside to cool.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to 90°F to 100°F you’re ready to make soap. (If you’re using a fragrance oil known to accelerate trace, then you will want to soap at a cooler temperature.)

Slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach a light trace, then weigh out and add the pink Himalayan salt and fragrance oil. (I used a lemon verbena fragrance oil for my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe since it’s so spring-y!) Use the stick blender to thoroughly combine the new additions with your soap batter and continue mixing until the soap reaches a medium to full trace. Now pour your soap into your mold(s) or mold cavities.

If you want your soap to gel, cover and insulate your soap. (I mixed my soap at cooler temps and lightly covered my soap mold with plastic wrap. My soap did not gel.)

Wait 24 hours, then unmold your soap. If your soap did not gel or is still soft, you may need to wait 2-3 days to cleanly unmold your soap from the silicone mold(s). Or, you can freeze your soap to remove it from the mold early if needed. Your soap should harden up in a few days.

If you used a loaf mold, you can now cut your soap into bars. If you used the 6-cavity silicone soap molds, your soap bars only need to cure as no cutting is needed unless you want to make smaller guest sized soaps.

Allow your soaps to cure 4-6 weeks before use. Then package and label as desired. If you are planning to sell your pink salt and sal butter soaps, be sure to include the weight of your soaps on each bar and avoid making any medical claims about your soaps to meet FDA guidelines.

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

If you like my pink salt and sal butter soap recipe, then you may also like my luxury double butter soap recipe. My luxury double butter soap recipe contains high percentages of both cocoa and shea butters making it perfect for anyone who suffers from dry skin. The recipe comes in both palm and palm free versions. You can find both of my luxury double butter soap recipes here.

Want to learn how to create your own custom cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator? See my tutorial on creating cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking and DIY Bath and Body boards on Pinterest. Or keep up with all of my new homemade soap, bath and beauty recipes by following me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

My son, like me, suffers from dry skin in the winter and asked if I could make him a really moisturizing soap for his skin. In the end I settled on a high conditioning/low cleansing double butter soap recipe made with 20% cocoa butter, 10% shea butter, and an 8% superfat. I also added corn silk powder to my recipe for it’s gentle exfoliating properties and a silky feel. And, to help curb potential skin issues, I also included a small amount of neem oil in the recipe as well.

My son’s other request for this homemade soap was that it make him “smell like a man.” So I scented it with a mahogany teakwood fragrance oil. Fragrance however, is optional, and you can either leave this double butter soap recipe unscented when you make yours or use a fragrance oil of your choice instead.

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

Before you get started on my luxury double butter soap recipe, there are a few things you should know. One, this soap recipe is NOT recommended for beginners. This soap moves really quickly and there’s a good chance it can and will seize up on you. Therefore you should soap at as low a temperature as possible and you may want to mix this one by hand. Should you use a stick blender, be prepared for this soap to basically act like you’re making it using the hot process soapmaking method should it seize.

If and when it does seize on you, simply wait for it to gel. (It will look translucent when it does this.) Then continue mixing if needed and pour (spoon) into your mold at this point. You can also wait for it to hit gel stage if you like before adding your fragrance. Unlike hot process soap however, you won’t need to add heat once you mix the oils, butter and lye-water as it’s going to heat up on its own and do all the work for you.

Two, I’m providing two separate soap recipe options for this double butter soap recipe – one with palm oil and one without – so that the final bars are as similar in properties as possible. I made mine with palm oil as I still have leftover palm oil I’m trying to use up. Palm oil can and will speed up trace and can contribute to the soap seizing. However, should you decide not to use palm oil, it may slow things down a bit for you. (Learn more about using palm oil and find more of my palm free cold process soap recipes here.)

Three, the neem oil in my double butter soap recipe is completely optional but I do highly recommend it. Probably my favorite carrier oil, neem oil is a common ingredient in skin and hair care products and is often used to treat problematic skin conditions including eczema and rosacea. It’s a moisturizing oil with regenerative properties and its naturally rich in vitamin E and essential fatty acids. It is also anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-fungal. While neem oil, as a stand alone product, has a strong odor, this scent is easily masked with natural essential oils or fragrance oils. (Click here to find more of my skin care recipes that contain neem oil.)

Learn how to make this luxury double butter soap recipe with high percentages of both cocoa butter and shea butter that's perfect for dry winter skin.

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (with Palm Oil)

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7.2 oz. cocoa butter
3.6 oz. shea butter
5.4 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
10.8 oz. olive oil
1.8 oz. castor oil
5.4 oz. palm oil
1.8 oz. palm kernel flakes
.25 oz. 100% neem oil, optional

 11.5 oz. distilled water
4.8 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

2 oz. – 2.5 oz. fragrance oil, optional
1 Tablespoon (60% solution) sodium lactate, optional
1 Tablespoon corn silk powder, optional

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (with Palm Oil)

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (Palm Free)

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

7.2 oz. cocoa butter
3.6 oz. shea butter
7.2 oz. 76° melt point coconut oil
10.8 oz. olive oil
1.8 oz. castor oil
5.4 oz. lard
.25 oz. 100% neem oil, optional

 11.5 oz. distilled water
4.8 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye

2 oz. – 2.5 oz. fragrance oil, optional
1 Tablespoon (60% solution) sodium lactate, optional
1 Tablespoon corn silk powder, optional

Luxury Double Butter Soap Recipe (Palm Free)

Instructions:

Both of these luxury double butter soap recipes will fit into one of my DIY wooden loaf soap molds and will yield approximately 10-12 bars depending on how thick you cut them.

You’ll need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking method instructions when making this homemade soap. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe to get you started. This is not a good soap recipe for beginner soapmakers.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Choose the double butter soap recipe you’d like to make, then begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the soapmaking oils using your digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until all the oils have melted, then remove from heat and set aside to cool.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to 85°F to 90°F – or room temp if it’s within your experience and comfort level – you’re ready to make soap.

Start by measuring out the corn silk powder with a measuring spoon and add to your melted soapmaking oils. Use a stick blender to combine until the soapmaking oils are free of clumps and the corn silk powder has been evenly distributed. As there’s the likelihood this soap may potentially seize, you may want to weigh out the fragrance oil and add it at this time as well rather than waiting til trace. Alternately, it can be added after the soap gels.

Now measure out the liquid sodium lactate and stir it into the lye-water. (Sodium lactate is used to make a harder bar of soap.)

Next, slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace. If the soap seizes, be patient. Wait for the soap to gel, then mix again and pour (or spoon) into your mold. Leave the soap uncovered overnight.

You should be able to unmold your soap the next day.

Once you’ve removed your soap from the mold, cut into bars then allow to cure 4-6 weeks before use.

Want to learn how to create your own custom cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator? See my tutorial on creating cold process soap recipes using a lye calculator here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking and DIY Bath and Body boards on Pinterest. Or keep up with all of my new homemade soap, bath and beauty recipes by following me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Palm Free Soap Recipes

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This traditional Castile soap recipe is made using 100% olive oil and is scented with natural basil, lemongrass and rosemary essential oils.Why Palm Free Soap Recipes?

Traditionally, one of the main ingredients of cold process soap has been palm oil. However, as the use of palm oil has increased primarily due to its cheap price and wide availability, there has been controversy within the soapmaking community regarding its use. Production of palm oil in Southeast Asia has resulted in not only the depletion of the rain forest which is being torn down to create palm plantations, but it also threatens endangered animals like orangutans and Sumatran tigers who call these rain forests home. Some soapmakers choose not to use palm oil at all because of this, while others choose to purchase only sustainable palm oil that is given oversight from state and third party environmental programs such as EcoSocial and the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil.

Because palm oil is so cheap, many commercial products are made using palm oil including soaps and stearic acid – a common ingredient in lotions. Shortening is also made with palm oil or a combination of palm oil and other oils. The popular brand, Crisco, now uses palm oil for its shortening in place of what was originally cottonseed oil.

As my goal with this blog is to provide information and recipes, I leave the decision of whether or not to use or not use palm oil up to you. However, should you choose to omit palm oil from your cold process soap recipes, I’m providing this collection of fifteen of my homemade cold process palm free soap recipes.

A collection of cold process palm free soap recipes for soapmakers who wish to make homemade cold process soaps without palm oil.

Homemade Palm Free Soap Recipes

1. Homemade Green Tea and Turmeric Soap Recipe – This homemade green tea & turmeric palm free soap recipe harnesses green tea’s anti-oxidant properties with turmeric’s anti-acne & skin lightening properties.

2. Homemade Peppermint & Patchouli Castile Soap Recipe – This homemade peppermint & patchouli Castile soap recipe lends a fun twist to a basic Castile soap recipe with Hawaiian alaea salt and midnight black clay.

3. Coconut Oil Facial Soap Recipe for Acne Prone Skin – This coconut oil facial soap recipe for acne prone skin combines ingredients known for their acne fighting properties to help skin acne free!

4. Spicy Pepper & Patchouli Palm Free Cold Process Soap Recipe – This cold process palm free soap recipe is scented with spicy pepper and patchouli, clove and cinnamon essential oils for a soap suitable for either sex.

A collection of cold process palm free soap recipes for soapmakers who wish to make homemade cold process soaps without palm oil.

5. Castile Soap Recipe with Bee Pollen Powder – This homemade Castile soap recipe is made with bee pollen powder which has skin soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.

6. Cold Process Wine Soap Recipe – This fun cold process wine soap recipe is a creative way to use up that leftover wine that’s sat in the fridge too long or simply wasn’t too your liking.

7. Homemade Bacon Soap Recipe for Men – This homemade bacon palm free soap recipe is made with real bacon fat and yields a hard, extra conditioning soap that can either smell like bacon or any other scent of your choice!

8. Nuts Over You Homemade Cold Process Soap Recipe – This nuts over you homemade cold process palm free soap reecipe is all about nut oils! And you’d be hard pressed to get a homemade soap bar any nuttier than this one!

A collection of cold process palm free soap recipes for soapmakers who wish to make homemade cold process soaps without palm oil.

9. Cold Process Macadamia Nut Salt Bar Soap Recipe – This fabulous homemade macadamia nut salt bar soap recipe is made with a generous percentage of moisturizing macadamia nut oil and natural sea salt.

10. Naughty Kitty Palm Free Cold Process Soap Recipe – My Naughty Kitty cold process palm free soap recipe is made using Australian Midnight Black Clay known for its detoxifying and conditioning properties.

Not pictured:

11. Green Tea & Agave Homemade Cold Process Soap Recipe – This green tea & agave homemade cold process palm free soap recipe is formulated with skin conditioning oils and boasts the anti-oxidant power of natural green tea.

12. Ginger and Lime Homemade Shampoo Bar Recipe with Silk – This homemade shampoo bar recipe is scented with a summery blend of lime & ginger and contains silk and hair nourishing argan, jojoba oils and shea butter!

13. Natural Handmade Activated Charcoal Facial Soap Recipe – This natural activated charcoal soap recipe contains activated charcoal to help detox skin and keep it blemish free. It also contains natural algae and lavender and tea tree essential oils.

14. Natural Homemade Patchouli Crunch Soap Recipe – This homemade patchouli soap recipe is perfect for the hippie in you! It contains a naturally exfoliating “granola crunch” and patchouli essential oil.

15. Traditional Castile Soap Recipe – This traditional Castile soap recipe is made using 100% olive oil and is scented with natural basil, lemongrass and rosemary essential oils.

Looking for a simple beginner soap recipe too try? Then give my beginner’s cold process soap recipe a try. This homemade soap recipe contains just three inexpensive ingredients that can be easily sourced at most grocery stores. And, there’s both a palm and a palm free version. Find the recipe here. Or go here for my tutorial on how to make cold process soap from scratch. Or go here to learn how to use a lye calculator to create your own custom cold process soap recipe.

For even more homemade soap recipes and palm free homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking and DIY Bath and Body boards on Pinterest. Or keep up with all of my new homemade soap, bath and beauty recipes by following me on Blog Lovin’TumblrFacebook, TwitterG+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Homemade Green Tea and Turmeric Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This homemade green tea and turmeric soap recipe harnesses green tea's anti-oxidant properties and combines it with turmeric's anti-acne, anti-aging and skin lightening properties for a fantastic homemade soap that's great for all skin types. (Plus it's palm free!)

For this homemade green tea and turmeric soap recipe I really wanted to combine two natural ingredients that have shown to have wonderful properties when used in skin care – green tea and turmeric root powder. The result was a convenient, everyday product that harnesses green tea’s anti-oxidant properties and combines it with turmeric’s power anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and skin lightening properties.

To create this green tea and turmeric soap recipe, I used a strong, cold brewed green tea in place of the water. I then added turmeric to my soapmaking oils which include three separate soapmaking butters – shea, mango and cocoa – for a truly luxurious homemade soap with extra skin conditioning properties. (I mean everyone needs that in the winter, right?) In addition, I also made this cold process soap recipe palm free.

This homemade green tea and turmeric soap recipe harnesses green tea's anti-oxidant properties and combines it with turmeric's anti-acne, anti-aging and skin lightening properties for a fantastic homemade soap that's great for all skin types. (Plus it's palm free!)

About the Ingredients.

Green tea, of course, is prized for it’s powerful anti-oxidant properties. That’s one of the reasons we drink it, right? (What antioxidants do is bind to oxidants, also known as free radicals, that cause cell damage and neutralize them so don’t damage the cells.) Because antioxidants can deactivate free radicals, it’s believed that they can also help to repair damage to skin tissue as well as prevent aging when used in skin care. (Source.)

Turmeric root powder has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine. Turmeric’s primary active ingredient, curcumin, has shown promising results in helping to fight cancer and slow cancer growth. (Source.) It also has wonderful anti-inflammatory properties when taken internally. (I take turmeric capsules daily for just this reason and it helps considerably!) In skin care, turmeric’s natural antiseptic, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties means it naturally helps to fight acne and blemishes. Turmeric is also used in traditional Indian skin care remedies to lighten and brighten the skin as well as to even out skin tone and lighten pigmentation and dark spots that come with aging.

This homemade green tea and turmeric soap recipe harnesses green tea's anti-oxidant properties and combines it with turmeric's anti-acne, anti-aging and skin lightening properties for a fantastic homemade soap that's great for all skin types. (Plus it's palm free!)

Homemade Green Tea and Turmeric Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

8 oz. coconut oil
2 oz. cocoa butter
1.5 oz. mango butter
2.5 oz. safflower oil
1 oz. shea butter
3 oz. castor oil
1 oz. hemp seed oil
2 oz. avocado oil
15 oz. olive oil

4.9 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide
11.8 oz. strong brewed green tea

1 oz. 60% solution liquid sodium lactate
1.5 oz. turmeric root powder
dried calendula flowers, optional
2 oz. fragrance oil, optional

Soap Notes:

Water as % of oils=33% (This is a softer soft even with the sodium lactate, especially if you’re using a fragrance oil for scent. If you need your soap to harden quicker try using 30% water discount.)

Superfat=6%

The sodium lactate was used at 2.7% of the total oil weight.

As with most of my homemade soap recipes, my homemade green tea and tumeric soap recipe will fit inside one of my DIY wooden loaf soap molds and will yield approximately 10-12 bars depending on how thick you cut them.

To Make the Green Tea:

I used Adagio’s fantastic cold-brew citron green tea for this green tea and tumeric soap recipe. Their cold brew pouches are my favorite as there’s no work involved other than dropping a cold-brew iced tea pouch into a pitcher of water overnight. (I sweeten mine afterwards with simple syrup.) They also work well for this homemade soap recipe.

To make the strong brewed green tea you’ll need to combine 15 oz. of distilled water with two cold-brew citron green tea pouches. Place in the refrigerator overnight. Then remove the green tea pouches and squeeze out the excess. (You need to use more water than called for in the recipe as the tea will retain some of the water content. If there’s leftover green tea, you can use the extra green tea to mix with these DIY facial cleansing grains!)

Soapmaking Instructions:

To make this homemade green tea and tumeric soap recipe, you’ll need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking method instructions. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the refrigerated green tea you’ve prepared in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, using a digital scale weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking oils and butters using a digital scale. Combine in a stainless steel pot then heat over medium heat on the stove until all the oils and butters have melted. Once melted, remove the soapmaking oils and butters from heat and set aside.

You can mix this green tea and turmeric soap recipe at any point in which your lye solution and soapmaking oils have cooled to around 95°F-110°F. Once you’re ready to make the soap, weigh out the sodium lactate and stir into the lye solution. Then weigh out the turmeric root powder and mix into the melted soapmaking oils using a stick blender. You are now ready to mix the lye solution and soapmaking oils together.

Slowly pour the lye solution into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach a light trace, then add your fragrance oil if desired. Continue mixing until you reach at least a a medium trace. (Because of the properties of ingredients used in this homemade soap recipe – especially the high percentage of olive oil and the lack of palm oil – this does take a bit longer to trace than most of my other soap recipes.)

Once, your soap has traced, pour the soap batter into your prepared mold. Add calendula petals to the top of the soap for visual interest if desired.  Finally, you’ll need to cover your soap for the saponification process. Cover with a piece of cardboard cut to fit your mold then place a folded towel or blanket over the mold to insulate it.

If you’re using a wooden loaf soap mold, you can remove your soap from the mold the next day. However, you’ll want to wait an additional day before cutting the soap into individual bars to the soap a bit of extra time to harden further. If you’re using a silicone loaf mold or individual silicone (shape) molds, I’d wait two to three days before attempting to unmold the soap to be sure the soap releases from the mold cleanly.

Allow your soap to cure for four to six weeks, then wrap and label your homemade soaps as desired for yourself, friends and family or to sell. (If you’re selling your homemade green tea and turmeric soaps in the United States, be sure to label your homemade soaps with the weight and refrain from making any medical claims about the final product.)

For more of my homemade soap recipes be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also follow me on Pinterest for collections of not only my homemade soap recipes and homemade holiday gift ideas but also some of my favorites from around the web.

Or keep up with all of my new homemade soap recipes and other DIY creations by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Homemade Peppermint & Patchouli Castile Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.



This homemade peppermint and patchouli Castile soap recipe lends a fun twist to a basic Castile soap.

This homemade peppermint and patchouli Castile soap recipe lends a fun twist to a basic Castile soap. Made using olive oil, this peppermint and patchouli Castile soap recipe also combines peppermint and patchouli essential oils for a fabulous unisex fragrance blend along with mineral rich Red Hawaiian Alaea Salt and a touch of Australian midnight black clay.

This homemade peppermint and patchouli Castile soap recipe lends a fun twist to a basic Castile soap.

Peppermint & Patchouli Castile Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

36 oz. virgin olive oil

4.5 oz. sodium hydroxide/lye
11 fl. oz. distilled water

.5 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)
1 Tablespoon Australian midnight black clay
2 Tablespoons Red Hawaiian Alaea Salt
1.5 oz. patchouli essential oil
.25 oz. peppermint essential oil (or .5 oz. peppermint fragrance oil)

Soap Notes:

water as % of oils = 30.5%
6% superfat
essential oils used at 4.8% of oil weight

This homemade peppermint and patchouli Castile soap recipe yields 10-12 bars of soap that will weigh around 4 oz. each depending on how they are cut and fits inside my DIY wooden loaf soap mold. Alternately, you can get nine 5.5 oz. round soaps using two Crafters Choice™ Basic Round Silicone Soap Molds or fifteen 3.3 oz. square soaps using three Tovolo King Silicone Ice Cube Trays.

Instructions:

You’ll need to follow my basic cold process soapmaking instructions for this homemade peppermint and patchouli Castile soap recipe.

(If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s another good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe. Or download my free beginner soapmaking ebook.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, using a digital scale weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the olive oil using a digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until all the olive oil reaches around 95°F remove from heat. Prepare you essential oils by weighing them out into a glass Pyrex measuring cup and set aside.

When the lye-water has cooled to around 90°-95°F – you want the olive oil and lye-water to be about the same temperature – you’re ready to make soap.

Weigh out the sodium lactate and stir into the cooled lye-water.

Next, weigh and add the clay and salt to the olive oil. Mix with a stick blender until thoroughly combined.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the olive oil/clay/salt mixture. Mix with a stick blender until you reach a light trace. Add the essential oils and combine with the stick blender until you reach a full trace.

Pour the soap into your prepared mold(s). Sprinkle with the red Hawaiian alaea salt if desired.

Level the top of the poured soap if needed. Leave uncovered so the soap doesn’t overheat or place in your refrigerator. Set aside for 48 hours.

After 48 hours your can unmold your peppermint and patchouli Castile soap. Unmold your soaps. If you made soap loaf and it’s hard enough, go ahead and cut it into bars when you unmold it. If it’s still a bit soft, wait an additional day then cut into bars.

Allow your homemade peppermint and patchouli Castile soaps to cure anywhere from 4 weeks to 6 months before use. The longer the cure the better the bar. Typically soaps created using a traditional Castile soap recipe are cured for 4 to 6 months for best results.

Once your Castile soaps have cured, wrap and label as desired. (Go here to learn how to make your own custom soap labels.)

For more of my homemade soap recipes as well as bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also follow me on Pinterest for collections of not only my homemade soap recipes and beauty DIY’s but also some of my favorites from around the web.

Keep track of all my new homemade soap recipes and other DIY creations by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.


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