Two Fabulous Fall Bath and Beauty Recipes and A Review of For Soap’s Sake Subscription Box

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

For Soap's Sake is a monthly soap supply subscription box that handpicks both unique and trending soapmaking supplies to send to you each and every month. The boxes included a variety of soapmaking supplies including molds, tools, ingredients, colorants, fragrances, and essential oils. And while monthly box subscriptions are available, you also have the option simply making a one time only box purchase.

Learn how to make your own DIY fall lip tint and a fall inspired caramel coffee scented dry body spray! Plus find lots of other ideas for ingredients found in this month’s For Soap’s Sake – a monthly soap supply subscription box! Don’t subscribe? Not to worry. You can visit For Soap’s Sake online to discover their list of suppliers and to find out where to buy your future soapmaking, bath and body ingredients.

Whether soapmaking is your hobby, your business or you’re just looking for DIY gift ideas for the holidays or wedding favors, For Soap’s Sake is a great way to try out new ingredients and find ideas that are sure to be hit for customers as well as friends and family.

What is For Soap’s Sake?

For Soap’s Sake is a monthly soap supply subscription box that handpicks both unique and trending soapmaking supplies to send to you each and every month. The boxes included a variety of soapmaking supplies including molds, tools, ingredients, colorants, fragrances, and essential oils. And while monthly box subscriptions are available, you also have the option simply making a one time only box purchase.

Of course no one wants to be stuck with soapmaking supplies they can’t use. Not only does a subscription box help you sample ingredients in smaller sizes, but there’s also a quiz on the For Soap’s Sake website that will help determine what comes in your box. Quiz questions ask what type of soaper you are – cold process/hot process, melt and pour and a bath and body maker – as well as whether you use only natural ingredients, what types of molds suit you best, whether you additives, etc.

In addition there are boxes available for every budget starting with the mini box at just $16.99 all the way up to the ultra box for $74.99. With four different box sizes to choose from, you simply can’t go wrong. Plus, if you opt to subscribe to For Soap’s Sake, you save 5%! A subscription to For Soap’s Sake also makes a great gift for a fellow DIY-er.

Not only is a box from For Soap’s Sake a great way to try out new ingredients, it’s also a great way to try out new soapmaking suppliers you may have not heard of or have not purchased for in the past.

Ready to subscribe now? Use coupon code: SOAPDELI5 and receive $5 off your first box from For Soap’s Sake. (You can order November’s box through October 31st.)

Learn how to make your own DIY Fall Lip Tint plus find lots of other ideas for ingredients found in this month's For Soap's Sake - a monthly soap supply subscription box!

I received the October box from For Soap’s Sake and was pretty excited about all the fun soapmaking ingredients and tools inside! My box included a spoon shaped silicone mold, a tear drop column mold – you’ve probably seen these used to make everything from rain drops in soap to seeds in watermelon soap – skewers, tea bags, dark cocoa butter, copper penny mica, bronze brown mica, titanium dioxide, marshmallow root powder, caramel coffee fragrance oil, afternoon tea fragrance oil, caffeine extract, vanilla stabilizer, and ylang ylang essential oil.

The ingredients were sourced from the following soapmaking suppliers: Nurture Soap, Nature’s Garden, Wholesale Supplies Plus, and Trendylee.

Discover two fantastic fall bath and beauty recipes for making your own DIY fall lip tint and DIY caramel coffee scented dry oil body spray!

Fall Bath and Beauty Recipes

I used several ingredients from the For Soap’s Sake October box to make two fall bath and beauty recipes. I used the dark cocoa butter and copper penny mica to make a fall lip tint and the caramel coffee fragrance oil to make a scented dry oil body spray one evening this past week with my friend Bambi. You can find those fall bath and beauty recipes below.

Learn how to make this copper tinted lip tint for fall! These make wonderful homemade gifts or wedding favors. Or add them to your product line for your online shop, Etsy shop, or to sell at farmer's markets and craft fairs!

Fall Lip Tint Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

.3 oz. dark cocoa butter
.3 oz. beeswax
.15 oz. (76° melt point) coconut oil
.1 oz. lanolin
.25 oz. sweet almond oil
1 Tablespoon copper penny mica
2 mL lavender essential oil
12 drops ginger or fresh ginger essential oil
10 drops cocoa absolute

Instructions:

You will need a digital scale to weigh out the ingredients for this recipe.

Learn how to make this copper tinted lip tint for fall! These make wonderful homemade gifts or wedding favors. Or add them to your product line for your online shop, Etsy shop, or to sell at farmer's markets and craft fairs!

Begin by weighing out the dark cocoa butter and beeswax into a small glass Pyrex measuring cup. Heat in the microwave at 50% power or less until melted. (Alternately you can also use a double boiler.)

Weigh out the coconut oil and lanolin and stir into the melted beeswax and cocoa butter. If necessary, gently reheat the ingredients again to ensure they are fully melted. Stir well to ensure even distribution. (If you prefer not to use lanolin you can substitute more coconut oil for the lanolin or use shea butter! For a vegan lip tint you can also substitute the beeswax with .15 oz. of carnauba wax. You do need to use less carnauba wax as it is a harder wax than beeswax.)

Now weigh out the sweet almond oil and stir into the melted lip tint ingredients, again reheating if necessary.

Next, using a graduated transfer pipette, measure out the lavender essential oil and add into the lip tint. Then use fresh pipettes or droppers to add the ginger essential oil and the cocoa absolute. Mix well.

Learn how to make this copper tinted lip tint for fall! These make wonderful homemade gifts or wedding favors. Or add them to your product line for your online shop, Etsy shop, or to sell at farmer's markets and craft fairs!

Using a tablespoon measuring spoon, measure out the copper penny mica and stir into your lip tint. Mix well.

Learn how to make this copper tinted lip tint for fall! These make wonderful homemade gifts or wedding favors. Or add them to your product line for your online shop, Etsy shop, or to sell at farmer's markets and craft fairs!

Now slowly pour the melted lip tint into your containers, stirring the mixture after each pour.

For this fall lip tint recipe Bambi and I evenly filled six small metal slide top tins. I received my metal tins from SKS Bottle & Packaging which you can find here.

Learn how to make this copper tinted lip tint for fall! These make wonderful homemade gifts or wedding favors. Or add them to your product line for your online shop, Etsy shop, or to sell at farmer's markets and craft fairs!

Once the lip tints have set up completely, slide on the lids for each tin then label as desired for personal use or gifting.

Learn how to make this copper tinted lip tint for fall! These make wonderful homemade gifts or wedding favors. Or add them to your product line for your online shop, Etsy shop, or to sell at farmer's markets and craft fairs!

For my labels I purchased feather clipart from Huckleberry Hearts on Etsy, then used a Word program to create my labels. (Learn how to create your own custom labels with my step-by-step tutorial here.) Then simply print your newly created labels onto label sheets – I get mine from World Label – and apply to the lids of your tins.

If you’re making your fall bath and beauty recipes to sell (for small commercial use) and want to use the same clipart as I have but without credit, you would need to purchase a commercial license from the creator.

You’ll also want to make sure you label your lip tints appropriately to meet state and federal laws. If you’re unsure about the rules and regulations regarding labeling cosmetics, I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

This caramel coffee dry body oil spray recipe is the perfect scent for fall! Not only does it smell delectable, but this non-greasy dry oil also moisturizes skin and leaves it feeling silky smooth.

Caramel Coffee Dry Oil Body Spray Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

3.8 oz. Cyclomethicone
3.8 oz. grape seed oil (or other liquid at room temperature carrier oil of choice)
.25 oz. caramel coffee fragrance oil

Instructions:

Weigh out the cyclomethicone, grape seed oil and fragrance oil into a medium glass Pyrex measuring cup. Stir to combine thoroughly, then use a funnel to pour your dry oil body spray evenly into two 4 oz. silver aluminum metal bullet round bottles. Screw on the sprayer top of your choice, then label as desired. (I received my aluminum bottles and sprayers from Container & Packaging Supply who you can find online here.

For the dry oil body spray pictured above, I also used the feather clipart I purchased from Huckleberry Hearts on Etsy.

Draw your own labels for a DIY dry oil body spray to create a unique homemade gift for friends and family this holiday season.

You can also draw your own labels for your dry oil body sprays to create unique homemade gifts for friends and family this holiday season. Pictured above is the label I drew freehand for my dry oil body spray.

Draw your own labels for a DIY dry oil body spray to create a unique homemade gift for friends and family this holiday season.

Bambi also drew her coffee inspired labels freehand.

Draw your own labels for a DIY dry oil body spray to create a unique homemade gift for friends and family this holiday season.

To create your labels simply sketch out your drawing onto blank sticker paper, using the bottle as a guide so you get the label size right. The color your drawing in with permanent markers or your other favorite medium. Cut out the label.

Draw your own labels for a DIY dry oil body spray to create a unique homemade gift for friends and family this holiday season.

Now take a clear or crystal clear sticker label and cut the label so it’s slightly larger than your image. Remove the backing from the clear sticker label and place it on top of your image so the image is fully covered. Trim off the excess label. (Alternately, if your labels are small enough, you can also do the same thing with packing tape.) Now adhere the label you just created to your dry body oil spray bottle. And you’re done!

Again, you’ll need to label your dry oil body sprays appropriately to meet state and federal laws if you plan to sell them.

Caffeinated Soap Recipe

What else can I make?

Need ideas for other fall bath and beauty recipes you can make using ingredients from the October For Soap’s Sake box? You can use the caffeine extract to make a DIY anti-puff eye roller, a DIY caffeinated soap with a coffee scrub center, and a DIY orange coconut coffee scrub. (You can also use the vanilla stabilizer to keep your caffeinated soap, above, from turning brown.)

You can use the marshmallow root powder to create herbal facial cleansing grains, glycerin cold process shaving soap, handmilled whiskey and tobacco caramel soap, cold process vanilla and fig shaving soap, cold process natural lanolin shaving soap, and cold process patchouli granola crunch soap.

The bronze brown mica can be used to create fall melt and pour soaps, lemon and ginger tinted lip balm, stamped cold process candied orange soaps, and stamped melt and pour conversation heart soaps.

What will you be making with the ingredients from your October For Soap’s Sake box? Share your soap, bath and beauty projects in the comments below.

For more fall bath and beauty recipes, be sure to follow me on PinterestG+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Fun DIY Soap Tutorials for DIY Lemon Soap and DIY Emoji Soap

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Fun DIY Soap Tutorials! Learn how to make your own DIY Lemon Slice Soaps and DIY Emoji Soaps with these fun DIY video soap tutorials from makoccino!

Beat the heat & get crafty inside this weekend with these Fun DIY soap tutorials!

Learn how to make your own DIY Lemon Slice Soaps and DIY Emoji Soaps with these fun DIY soap tutorials from makoccino!

DIY Lemon Soap

This fun DIY soap tutorial from makoccino will show you how to make your own DIY Lemon Slice Soaps. You can also use the same soapmaking tutorial to create other DIY Citrus Slice Soaps like oranges and limes!

For this project you’ll need both clear and white melt and pour soap bases, round molds in different sizes or a cookie cutter, yellow soap colorant and lemon essential oil. (I recommend using 12 drops of essential oil for every ounce of soap. For larger batches of soap, use .05%.)

DIY Emoji Soap

This next soapmaking video tutorial from makoccino shows you how to make your own DIY Emoji Soaps!  Made using water soluble paper, simply download the graphic images (provided in the description of this soapmaking tutorial here) and print them onto the water soluble paper using your inkjet printer.

Don’t want to make emoji soaps? You can use any image of you like for these fun DIY soaps. These would be great as party favors for themed parties, especially birthday parties. Think Pokemon images for a kids’ Pokemon themed birthday party!

Looking for Pokemon inspired bath and body video tutorials? Be sure to visit this blog post to learn how to make your own DIY Pokemon Pokeball Bath Bombs and DIY Pokemon Pokeball Soaps for your Pokemon Go fans!

For more fun DIY soap tutorials, be sure to follow my DIY Bath & Body Board on Pinterest. (You can also follow this group Soap-making Pinterest board.) And for even more fun DIY ideas, follow me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr and Blog Lovin’.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Reader Submission: Shea Butter and Witch Hazel Soap

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

I LOVE these homemade soap photographs sent in by Marilyn, one of much appreciated and amazing blog readers. Marilyn created the homemade soap pictured using my Homemade Shea Butter & Witch Hazel Soap Recipe. Aren't they just beautiful? They remind me of Van Gogh's Starry Night.

I LOVE these homemade soap photographs sent in by Marilyn, one of much appreciated and amazing blog readers. Marilyn created the homemade soap pictured using my Homemade Shea Butter & Witch Hazel Soap Recipe. Aren’t they just beautiful? They remind me of Van Gogh’s Starry Night.

Following are Marilyn’s comments on my shea butter & witch hazel soap recipe.

“Oh my, I’m so impatient. I couldn’t wait to check the soap qualities. What a luxurious stable lather! …I haven’t soaped with Witch Hazel, or sesame oil before. Wow, this Is a keeper, for sure. I’ve made other recipes with a similar fatty acid profile but what makes this so incredibly luxurious? Do you think it’s really the witch hazel? Or the high percentage of Shea butter? Or I’ve never soaped with sesame oil?  Would love to try the exact same recipe without the witch hazel, because if that’s the secret, then mountain rose has something pretty special.”

To answer her question I feel like it’s simply a combination of the ingredients chosen that made this one a keeper, even if it’s a bit tough to make. But the witch hazel does add a unique feel I haven’t ever quite achieved with other homemade soap recipes. The witch hazel that both Marilyn and I used for this particular homemade soap recipe can be found at Mountain Rose Herbs here. Or learn how to make your own homemade shea butter and witch hazel soap now with homemade recipe here.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, including my new favorite luxury double butter soap recipe, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking board on Pinterest. Or, if you’re interested in making palm free cold process soap, you can find my collection of palm free cold process soap recipes here. And, if you’re a first timer, you can learn how to make cold process soap from scratch here.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


How to Make Your Own Cold Process Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Learn how to make your own cold process soap recipe from scratch plus information on how to use a lye calculator and other soapmaking notes and tips.

Now that you’ve read my cold process soapmaking tutorial on how to make cold process soap from scratch and turned out a few successful batches, you’re probably ready to explore some of your own creative soapmaking ideas and learn how to make your own cold process soap recipe from scratch. This does require knowledge of basic chemistry about your soapmaking ingredients – fats and alkali.

Your fats – or soapmaking oils and butters – will very much determine what properties your soap will have. For example, three of the traditionally popular soapmaking oils, especially for beginners, are olive oil, coconut oil, and palm oil. Olive oil helps to create a moisturizing bar with a stable lather; coconut oil produces a hard, cleansing bar with a fluffy lather; and palm oil makes for a hard bar with a stable lather. Each of these oils has its own SAP (or saponification) value which determines how much lye should be used in the soap recipe for saponification to occur in such a way that it makes soap. Too much lye and you have an unusable bar of soap. Not enough and you could end up with a really soft soap with excess oil.

A great resource for learning more about the saponification process and the properties of various soapmaking fats & oils is Susan Miller Cavitch’s book, The Soapmaker’s Companion. Her book also contains a great troubleshooting section to help you figure out what might have gone wrong with a soap recipe as well as a nice collection of her own recipes.

This homemade cold process glycerin shaving soap recipe includes extra vegetable glycerin that's added to the regular soapmaking oils during the soapmaking process.

How to make your own cold process soap recipe.

When creating your own homemade soap recipes, there are also a lot of additional free resources to help you with this process. Lye calculators, for example, will automatically calculate the amount of lye you need in a recipe based on the amounts and types of oils you plan to incorporate into your recipe. You can find multiple links to lye calculators by conducting a google search. However, the lye calculator at SoapCalc.net can help you to create a soap recipe that meets your expectations for the properties you’re looking for in your own soaps. It does this by giving recommended ranges for the various soap qualities and fatty acids and tells you where your soap recipe falls in regards to each of these ranges.

Learn how to make your own cold process soap recipe from scratch plus information on how to use a lye calculator and other soapmaking notes and tips.

However, the soap calculator at SoapCalc.net is a bit more complex than some of the other soap calculators available so you’ll need a little more information to get started with this lye calculator. Certainly don’t let that intimidate you though. You can discover some pretty fantastic soap recipes through trial and error.

To use the lye calc at soapcalc.net you’ll need to enter a little bit of information in addition to your ingredients. Since you’ll be making cold process soap you’ll need to choose the radio button for NaOH (sodium hyroxide.) KOH or potassium hydroxide is used to make liquid soap.

Next, choose which measurement you’ll be using to weigh your oils. I recommend using either grams or ounces. I typically weigh out my ingredients in ounces however for smaller recipes you’ll find that grams will always be the most accurate as it’s a smaller unit of measure.

Third choose your water as % of oils or the water discount. I highly encourage you to set this at 33%. Otherwise you’ll likely have a very soft soap to start out with which will not only take longer before it can be unmolded but will also take much, much longer to cure as there’s so much more excess water that needs to evaporate. Occasionally I use less than 33% for soap recipes that are using a lot of oils that are know for creating a softer soap. For example, a 100% olive oil soap – or what is known as a traditional Castile soap – is going to start out as a much softer soap and requires a cure time of 4-6 months rather than 4-6 weeks. In this case I typically use 30.5% as the water discount amount.

Next choose a superfat amount. A soap with 0% superfat has no extra oils left over in the final soap bars once saponification is complete. To superfat a soap means you have extra fats (or oils) that are left unsaponified in your final bars of soap. These unsaponified oils help to make soap more conditioning. It is standard practice to use at least a 5% superfat unless you are making a laundry soap. This saves your butt in case of small errors in measurements and keeps your soap from stripping too much excess oil from your skin when bathing. For a more conditioning soap you would use a higher superfat of up to 8%. However, in some situations, you may choose to use an even higher superfat amount for personal reasons or simply because it’s “good science.”

For example coconut oil has natural cleansing properties in soap. As such it’s recommended you only use up to 30% coconut oil in your soap recipe to avoid an overly cleansing soap that will strip skin of its natural oils. (I typically only use 20% or less as I prefer soaps that are more conditioning than cleansing.) 100% coconut oil soaps are very cleansing which is great for making laundry soap. However, it’s not so great for skin. You can overcome this in a 100% coconut oil soap however by superfatting your soap recipe at 20%.

There are times however, or “bad science,” that a really high superfat doesn’t make sense. Coconut oil has a very long shelf life and therefore isn’t prone to going rancid. Other oils, however, have a much shorter shelf life. Because of the higher percentage of oils left unsaponified at a superfat percentage above 8%, they can go rancid more quickly than you might like and cause what is commonly referred to as DOS. DOS or dreaded orange spots are basically unsaponified oils that have gone rancid. Should this occur to any of your soaps, and sadly it sometimes does, you can salvage the soap by grating it and using it as a laundry soap.

Next, if you are using a fragrance for your soap recipe choose your fragrance amount. Typically fragrance oils are used at 1 oz. per pound or less and essential oils at half that amount or less. However, this can vary depending on the type of fragrance oil or essential oil you are using. Typically fragrance oils are used at a max of 5-6% of your recipe. Sometimes the maximum usage amount for a cold process soap recipe is lower. In this case you’d need to refer to the manufacturer’s guidelines on the maximum amount of fragrance oil that is safe to use. For essential oils, the usage rate is typcially between 1-3%.

Now select your soapmaking oils, fats and waxes for your soap recipe. Click on the first oil, fat or wax you are using then click on the plus sign for the #1 spot on the Recipe Oil List. If you know the specific oil weight you’ll need for your soap recipe – say you have a 3 lb. mold – hit the lb radio button. Enter the amount of the first oil you plan to use.

Learn how to make your own cold process soap recipe from scratch plus information on how to use a lye calculator and other soapmaking notes and tips.

For example, if you are making a 3 lb. batch of soap and you want to use coconut oil at 20% of your recipe, multiply 48 ounces (if you chose the weight of the oils to be in ounces) times .2 for 9.6 ounces. Enter 9.6 in the first box.

Now repeat with all of the remaining oils until you’ve reached the total oil weight of your recipe. Click on Calculate Recipe then View or Print Recipe. Your recipe will open in a second window and give you the amount of lye and water you’ll need based on the data you entered, the amount of fragrance oil to use and information on what the soap bar quality will yield. While it’s not a hard and fast rule that you fall within the recommended ranges of soap bar quality for hardness, cleansing, conditioning, bubbly, creamy, iodine and INS, it’s safer to stay within these ranges if you’re just starting out and learning for more successful results until you learn more through experience and further research.

Learn how to make your own cold process soap recipe from scratch plus information on how to use a lye calculator and other soapmaking notes and tips.

Pictured above is a test recipe I threw together as an example of what your final recipe will look like after inputting your information into SoapCalc. Pretty neat, huh? (This lye calc has actually taught me that both hemp seed oil and sunflower oil are high in iodine.)

FYI It is good practice to always double check the amount of lye in a recipe with a lye calculator if you are unsure of its source.

Re-sizing your cold process soap recipe.

Not using the lye calculator at SoapCalc? Other lye calculators, like the one at Brambleberry automatically give you a more standard amount of water or liquid needed for your soap recipe. This makes it somewhat simpler to use if you’re just getting started. While it doesn’t offer as many oil choices as SoapCalc and won’t give you an idea of what properties your soap will have, Brambleberry does have a simple and easy tool to resize your soap recipe once you input it into the lye calculator. You can learn how to re-size a cold process soap calculator using Brambleberry’s lye calculator here.

Need a quick and easy way to learn to what properties the soapmaking oils you want to use have? It’s as easy as a google search! Properties and suggested amounts can be found on most soapmaking supplier websites. So typically you can visit the website of your favorite supplier and the product page of the ingredients you are interested in buying will tell you what properties a particular ingredient will lend to the soap as well as the recommended amount. Alternately you can type into your search box phrases like “properties of hemp seed oil in soap” or “recommended amount of hemp seed oil in soap” and you’ll find all kinds of valuable information.

Summer Bee Meadow also has a simple chart for quick reference on their website that provides a collection of commonly used oils in soapmaking along with their fatty acids and resulting soap characteristics. Another website, Lovin’ Soap Studio, has a chart with commonly used oils and the recommended usage rates. You should also be able to determine the shelf life of your ingredients from the manufacturer or soap supply company you purchase your ingredients from.

Learn how to make your own cold process soap recipe from scratch plus information on how to use a lye calculator and other soapmaking notes and tips.

How to determine how much soap you need to fit your soap mold.

Need to re-size a soap recipe to fit into a mold but aren’t sure what to scale the recipe to? There’s a simple formula for determining the weight of the soapmaking oils needed for your mold. About.com has a formula and instructions for calculating the amount of soap needed to fill a mold here. They give the basic math equations for determining the correct soap recipe size for standard square or traditional molds, round or tube molds and odd or irregularly shaped molds.

Got it? Great! Be sure to head back over to my article on how to make cold process soap from scratch for reference when making your homemade soaps and links to other great soapmaking resources.

For a directory of my homemade soap recipes as well as bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also follow me on Pinterest for collections of not only my homemade soap recipes and beauty DIY’s but also some of my favorites from around the web.

Or simply keep up with of all my new homemade soap recipes and other DIY creations by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Homemade Easter Chicks Soap Giveaway

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Pretty Pink Easter Chick Peeps Handmade Soap DIY

With spring already here and Easter right around the corner I decided to gift one lucky winner with the three Homemade Easter Chick Peeps Soaps I created for my latest DIY Easter craft project! One person will win all three of my handmade Peeps inspired soaps.

Homemade Easter Peeps Soaps - DIY Soapmaking Tutorial and Easter Basket Gift Idea

The orange chick soap is scented with lemongrass mint, the pink chick soap is scented with pink berry mimosa, and the yellow chick soap is scented with a Be Delicious Blossom type fragrance oil.

For a chance to win all three of these handmade soaps simply pin this Easter project to your DIY or Easter inspired board on Pinterest! Then tell me where to find your pin by entering via Rafflecopter below. USA residents can enter for a chance to win through April 7th, 2014. Also be sure to follow my new DIY Homemade Easter Crafts & Treats board on Pinterest for more great ideas of things you can craft for Easter.

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.