DIY Cactus Soap with Eco-Friendly Biodegradable Glitter

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Learn how to make your own colorful DIY cactus soap using melt and pour soap! This glittery, colorful cactus soap recipe is easier to make than you might think! And it makes a great DIY back to school teacher gift!

Learn how to make your own colorful DIY cactus soap using melt and pour soap! This glittery, colorful cactus soap recipe is easier to make than you might think! And it makes a great DIY back to school teacher gift! Crafted using a combination of detergent free melt and pour soap bases and eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter, my DIY cactus soap is not only fun to use, but it's also safe for the environment and your skin.

Crafted using a combination of detergent free melt and pour soap bases and eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter, my DIY cactus soap is not only fun to use, but it’s also safe for the environment and your skin.

Keep reading to learn how to make your own sparkly cactus soaps!

Why eco-friendly glitter?

Eco-friendly, biodegradable cosmetic glitter hasn’t been around long but now that it’s readily available it allows you to make a positive impact on the environment. Eco-friendly glitter is biodegradable, sustainable, compostable and environmentally safe. While traditional glitter not only hangs around in the environment, but also pollutes our water and has a negative effect on marine wildlife.

Made from the cellulose from eucalyptus trees, eco-friendly biodegradable glitter is body safe and therefore can be used in face painting, soapmaking, bath bombs and other skin care applications. You can learn more about biodegradable glitter at The Sparkle Party here.

Tools you’ll need.

My DIY cactus soap requires two silicone soap molds. You will need this Blush cactus silicone mold and this six cavity rectangle silicone soap mold to make these soaps.

You’ll also need 2 lbs. of a melt and pour soap base. I used three different Stephenson melt and pour soap bases for my DIY cactus soap. However, you can use the same base for each step if desired. You’ll just need to make sure it’s a clear melt and pour soap base so you can see the layers of eco-friendly glitter!

You may also find a spray bottle filled with isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol) helpful in removing any air bubbles that may arise.

In addition, you will also need a digital scale to weigh all of the ingredients, a 4-cup glass Pyrex measuring cup, a potato peeler and a microwave or double boiler.

Learn how to make your own colorful DIY cactus soap using melt and pour soap! This glittery, colorful cactus soap recipe is easier to make than you might think! And it makes a great DIY back to school teacher gift! Crafted using a combination of detergent free melt and pour soap bases and eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter, my DIY cactus soap is not only fun to use, but it's also safe for the environment and your skin.

DIY Cactus Soap

© Rebecca Dawn Dillon

Ingredients:

Cactus Soap Embed Ingredients:

3 oz. Stephenson Goat’s Milk Melt and Pour Soap Base
green soap colorant of choice, to suit
.1 oz. skin safe fragrance oil, of choice

Bottom Layer Soap Ingredients:

16 oz. Stephenson Aloe Melt and Pour Soap Base
blue soap colorant of choice, to suit
.45 oz. skin safe fragrance oil, of choice

Top Layer Soap Ingredients:

6.65 oz. Stephenson Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base
eco-friendly biodegradable glitter in colors of choice, to suit
.2 oz. skin safe fragrance oil, of choice

Gold Accent Ingredients:

gold mica powder
isopropyl alcohol

Instructions:

You’ll begin by making the cactus soap embeds for your DIY cactus soap. To do this, use a digital scale to weigh out 3 oz. of Stephenson Goat’s Milk Melt and Pour Soap Base. Cut the soap into chunks then combine in a 4-cup glass Pyrex measuring cup. Heat the soap at 50% power in the microwave until melted.

Tip: If you want more color pop to your cactus soap embed, use a clear melt and pour soap base for this step.

Once the soap has melted, remove from heat and stir in your green soap colorant to suit. (I specifically used a jade green mica powder for this step. ) Mix well until the color is evenly distributed throughout. Then weigh out and stir in .1 oz. fragrance oil by weight. (I used a melon ball fragrance oil to scent my DIY cactus soap.)

Learn how to make your own colorful DIY cactus soap using melt and pour soap! This glittery, colorful cactus soap recipe is easier to make than you might think! And it makes a great DIY back to school teacher gift! Crafted using a combination of detergent free melt and pour soap bases and eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter, my DIY cactus soap is not only fun to use, but it's also safe for the environment and your skin.

Pour the melted green soap into all six of the cavities of your cactus silicone soap mold. Set aside.

While the cactus soap is cooling, you can make the bottom layer of blue soap in the rectangle soap mold.

To do this, weigh out 16 oz. of Stephenson Aloe Melt and Pour Soap Base. Cut into cubes and combine in a 4-cup glass Pyrex measuring cup. Heat in the microwave at 50% power until melted.

Remove the melted soap from the microwave and add your blue soap colorant to suit. (I specifically used an electric blue mica powder for this step.) Mix well until the color is evenly distributed throughout. Then weigh out and stir in .45 oz. of fragrance oil by weight.

Evenly pour the blue soap into each of the six cavities of your rectangle silicone mold. Fill each cavity 3/4 of the way full. Then spritz the soap with alcohol to remove any air bubbles. Set the molded soap aside to re-harden.

Learn how to make your own colorful DIY cactus soap using melt and pour soap! This glittery, colorful cactus soap recipe is easier to make than you might think! And it makes a great DIY back to school teacher gift! Crafted using a combination of detergent free melt and pour soap bases and eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter, my DIY cactus soap is not only fun to use, but it's also safe for the environment and your skin.

Once both the blue soap and the green cactus soaps have hardened, you’re ready for the next step.

Spritz the tops of the blue rectangle soap bars in the rectangle silicone mold with alcohol. Then sprinkle a fine layer of eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter on top of the soap bars. I used a combination of fine and chunky glitters in several colors.

Remove the green cactus soap embeds from the cactus silicone mold.

Learn how to make your own colorful DIY cactus soap using melt and pour soap! This glittery, colorful cactus soap recipe is easier to make than you might think! And it makes a great DIY back to school teacher gift! Crafted using a combination of detergent free melt and pour soap bases and eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter, my DIY cactus soap is not only fun to use, but it's also safe for the environment and your skin.

Spritz the tops of the blue soaps again and then place each of the cactus soaps on top of the blue soap bars. Set aside.

Next, weigh out 6.65 oz. of Stephenson Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base. Cut into chunks and combine in a 4-cup glass Pyrex measuring cup. Add several pinches of glitter to suit, then weigh out and add .2 oz. of fragrance oil. Stir to combine.

Spritz the tops of the soaps in the rectangle mold with alcohol.

Now, with one finger pressing down on one of the cactus soaps, slowly pour the clear soap into the cavity of the mold that you are pressing down on the cactus soap of. Fill the cavity to the top of the mold with soap, then repeat the process with the remaining five cavities of your mold.

Learn how to make your own colorful DIY cactus soap using melt and pour soap! This glittery, colorful cactus soap recipe is easier to make than you might think! And it makes a great DIY back to school teacher gift! Crafted using a combination of detergent free melt and pour soap bases and eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter, my DIY cactus soap is not only fun to use, but it's also safe for the environment and your skin.

Spritz the tops of all of the soap bars with rubbing alcohol to remove any air bubbles, then dust them with a fine layer of glitter. Set the soaps aside to harden.

Learn how to make your own colorful DIY cactus soap using melt and pour soap! This glittery, colorful cactus soap recipe is easier to make than you might think! And it makes a great DIY back to school teacher gift! Crafted using a combination of detergent free melt and pour soap bases and eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter, my DIY cactus soap is not only fun to use, but it's also safe for the environment and your skin.

Once your soaps have rehardened, you’re ready to paint on the gold accents. To do this, combine a small amount of gold mica powder with rubbing alcohol so it’s somewhere between fluid and a paste. Then, using a small paintbrush, paint the mica onto the tops and edges of the cacti as desired. Let dry.

Learn how to make your own colorful DIY cactus soap using melt and pour soap! This glittery, colorful cactus soap recipe is easier to make than you might think! And it makes a great DIY back to school teacher gift! Crafted using a combination of detergent free melt and pour soap bases and eco-friendly, biodegradable glitter, my DIY cactus soap is not only fun to use, but it's also safe for the environment and your skin.

Now remove each of your DIY cactus soaps from the rectangle silicone mold. Use a potato peeler to bevel the top edges on all six of your soaps.

All that’s left is to tightly wrap each of your cactus soaps in foodservice film to protect them from dirt and moisture. Your cactus soaps are now ready for personal use or gifting!

Mermaid Soap! Make waves with this awesome mermaid soap tutorial that lets you explore your creative side! Crafted using a combination of melt and pour soap bases, this soapmaking project makes a fun filled weekend project you can enjoy with friends or family!

If you enjoyed my melt and pour DIY cactus soap tutorial, then you may like some of my other melt and pour soap recipes. You can find my entire library of melt and pour soap recipes here. In addition you may also enjoy both my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board and my DIY Bath & Body Pinterest board. Or simply follow all of my Pinterest boards here.

You can also follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts from Soap Deli News blog to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.

Have you made my DIY cactus soaps or another bath and body related product? I’d love to see them! Be sure to share your own projects with me and my readers by tagging them with #soapdelishowoff on instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

New Soapmaking Book + A Triple Butter Silk & Agave Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

I’m super excited to be able to share not only a new soapmaking book with you but a new soap recipe as well! This triple butter silk & agave soap recipe is from Jan Berry’s new soapmaking book, Simple & Natural Soapmaking! As the author behind both The Nerdy Farm Wife blog and her previous book, 101 Easy Homemade Products for Your Skin, Health & Home, Jan Berry brings her expertise as an herbalist to you in a new soapmaking book that offers a modern twist on creating truly natural, eco-friendly soaps.

Herbalist Jan Berry's new soapmaking book, Simple & Natural Soapmaking, is a comprehensive guide to creating truly natural, eco-friendly homemade soaps with foraged botanicals, essential oils and other common ingredients. Beginning soapmakers will discover detailed soapmaking tutorials, soapmaking recipes and step-by-step photos to help guide them through the process of modern soapmaking.

A Must Have New Soapmaking Book

Simple & Natural Soapmaking is a comprehensive guide to creating your own natural homemade soaps using foraged botanicals, essential oils and other common ingredients. Beginning soapmakers will discover detailed soapmaking tutorials, soapmaking recipes and step-by-step photos to help guide them through the process of modern soapmaking. There are fifty unique soap recipes in total, all of which are inspired by her very own herb and vegetable gardens as well as the farm, forest and sea.

This beautiful soapmaking book covers both traditional cold process soapmaking as well the more modern hot process soapmaking method. In addition to these recipes, Jan’s new soapmaking book also features guides on the properties of various essential oils, oil and milk infusions with healing herbs and easy decoration techniques.

Herbalist Jan Berry's new soapmaking book, Simple & Natural Soapmaking, is a comprehensive guide to creating truly natural, eco-friendly homemade soaps with foraged botanicals, essential oils and other common ingredients. Beginning soapmakers will discover detailed soapmaking tutorials, soapmaking recipes and step-by-step photos to help guide them through the process of modern soapmaking.

While suitable for beginners, Jan’s new soapmaking book is also a great resource for seasoned soapmakers as well. The beautiful photos, appealing soap recipes and in-depth tutorials make this new soapmaking book a treasure for any soaping library.

Right now, if you pre-order Simple & Natural Soapmaking, you’ll receive complimentary access to Jan’s 6 Weeks of Soapmaking Success eCourse! (Normally $47, yours free!) This soapmaking course dives deeper into six areas of soapmaking that are often challenging or intimidating to soapmakers. Each lesson will equip you with the information you need to experience further success in your soapmaking endeavors as well as provide inspiring soapmaking videos to demonstrate that lesson’s theme.

Herbalist Jan Berry's new soapmaking book, Simple & Natural Soapmaking, is a comprehensive guide to creating truly natural, eco-friendly homemade soaps with foraged botanicals, essential oils and other common ingredients. Beginning soapmakers will discover detailed soapmaking tutorials, soapmaking recipes and step-by-step photos to help guide them through the process of modern soapmaking.

You can pre-order Simple & Natural Soapmaking here. Once you’ve ordered your new soapmaking book, you can obtain access to the soapmaking success ecourse here. Lesson 1, Success with Fruits & Veggies, and Lesson 2, Success with Flowers & Herbs, are available now with a new course releasing each subsequent week on the following schedule:

• July 20: Success with Alternative Liquids
• July 27: Success with Natural Colorants
• Aug 3: Success with Simple Soap Designs
• Aug 10: Success with Soap Label Design

Ready to give Jan’s triple butter silk & agave soap recipe a try? You’ll find her creamy conditioning homemade soap recipe below.

Triple Butter Silk & Agave Soap Recipe! This sumptuous soap recipe is brimming with ingredients that your skin will adore. A trio of creamy conditioning butters ensures that your skin is well nourished, while silk adds an unparalleled touch of luxury.

Triple Butter Silk & Agave Soap Recipe

By Jan Berry

Yield: 7 to 8 Bars of Soap (2.5 LBS/1.13 KG)

This sumptuous soap recipe is brimming with ingredients that your skin will adore. A trio of creamy conditioning butters ensures that your skin is well nourished, while silk adds an unparalleled touch of luxury. The natural sugars from agave syrup provides a small boost to lather, but if it̕s not available, honey can be used in its place.

Triple Butter Silk & Agave Soap Recipe! This sumptuous soap recipe is brimming with ingredients that your skin will adore. A trio of creamy conditioning butters ensures that your skin is well nourished, while silk adds an unparalleled touch of luxury.

Ingredients:

8.75 oz (248 g) distilled water
3.85 oz (109 g) sodium hydroxide (lye)
Small pinch of Tussah silk

7 oz (198 g) coconut oil (25%)
3 oz (85 g) cocoa butter (10.7%)
3 oz (85 g) mango butter (10.7%)
3 oz (85 g) shea butter (10.7%)
12 oz (340 g) olive oil (42.9%)

1 tsp (5 ml) agave syrup mixed with 1 tsp (5 ml) water
1.23 oz (35 g) lavender essential oil (optional)

Instructions:

Wearing protective gloves and eyewear, carefully stir the lye into the distilled water. Add a small pinch of silk, then stir thoroughly. Set the lye solution aside in a safe place to cool.

Triple Butter Silk & Agave Soap Recipe! This sumptuous soap recipe is brimming with ingredients that your skin will adore. A trio of creamy conditioning butters ensures that your skin is well nourished, while silk adds an unparalleled touch of luxury.

Melt the coconut oil and solid butters, then add to the olive oil. Add the lye solution to the warm oils. Using a combination of hand stirring and an immersion blender, stir the soap until it reaches a light trace.

Stir in the essential oil, if using, and diluted agave syrup. Pour the soap batter into a prepared mold or individual molds. Cover lightly with a sheet of wax or freezer paper, then a towel or light blanket. Peek at the soap every so often; if it starts developing a crack, uncover and move it to a cooler location.

Triple Butter Silk & Agave Soap Recipe! This sumptuous soap recipe is brimming with ingredients that your skin will adore. A trio of creamy conditioning butters ensures that your skin is well nourished, while silk adds an unparalleled touch of luxury.

Keep the soap in the mold for 1 to 2 days, or until it̕s easy to remove, then slice it into bars when it̕s firm enough not to stick to your cutting tool. Cure on coated cooling racks or sheets of wax paper about 4 weeks before using.

If you’d like more detailed information on making cold process soap from scratch, you can find my tutorial for cold process soapmaking here. You may also be interested in my own cold process green tea & agave soap recipe available here.

To discover more soapmaking resources as well as additional homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board. You can also find more great bath, body and beauty recipes as well as a collection of food recipes and DIY projects on my Pinterest boards here.

Don’t want to miss any of my new recipe posts? Be sure to also follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts directly to your email via FeedBurner.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Blood Orange Soap Recipe with Blood Orange Essential Oil

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

This blood orange soap recipe is made with real orange powder and blood orange essential oil. Blood orange essential oil has anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make this blood orange soap recipe especially suitable for acne prone and combination skin.

This blood orange soap recipe is made with orange powder and blood orange essential oil which has anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and antibacterial properties making it a great homemade soap for acne prone and combination skin.

These soaps are great for summer when our skin tends to be oilier and we sweat more. While I did use a higher percentage of coconut oil in my blood orange soap recipe than I normally do, it’s still a lower cleansing/higher conditioning bar so your skin doesn’t feel stripped and dry after washing. After all, stripping too many of your skin’s natural oils can result in the overproduction of oil which leads to acne and blemishes.

In addition, I used colored mica powders to give my finished blood orange soaps some extra pop. However, you can also leave these soap bars al naturale if desired. You can find my blood orange soap recipe below along with my soapmaking notes.

This blood orange soap recipe is made with real orange powder and blood orange essential oil. Blood orange essential oil has anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make this blood orange soap recipe especially suitable for acne prone and combination skin.

Blood Orange Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

3.2 oz. cocoa butter
8 oz. refined coconut oil
4.8 oz. hemp oil
10.25 oz. pomace olive oil
5.7 oz. refined shea butter

9.75 oz. distilled water
4.3 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)
1.6 oz. orange powder
.3 oz. fine grain pink Himalayan salt
1 oz. blood orange essential oil
.1 oz. petitgrain essential oil

Soap Notes:

This blood orange soap recipe is made with real orange powder and blood orange essential oil. Blood orange essential oil has anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make this blood orange soap recipe especially suitable for acne prone and combination skin.

As with some of my past soap recipes, I’ve included a screenshot from SoapCalc (above) to make resizing my blood orange soap recipe easier. It also gives you an idea of the overall soap bar quality. (SoapCalc is great tool for anyone wanting to create their own custom soap recipes from scratch. You can learn how to create your own custom soap recipes using a lye calculator here.)

Also, as my blood orange soap recipe is palm free, I did a steep water discount and included both sodium lactate and a bit of salt for a harder bar.

For the molds, I used the Crafter’s Choice basic guest round silicone soap molds. However, you can also use two of the Crafter’s Choice basic round soap molds if you’re wanting larger bars.

Instructions:

You should be familiar with making cold process soap before trying my blood orange soap recipe. If you’ve never made cold process soap before – or any kind of soap in which you’re working with lye – I strongly recommend you start with a beginner soap recipe so you get a feel for the process and know you can create a successful soap. Otherwise, you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions to create this soap. You should adhere to all basic safety precautions when working with lye.

Begin by measuring out the amount of water called for in the recipe into a heat safe container. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye.

Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area. Stir the lye until it has dissolved, then set the lye-water aside.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking fats – these are all of the carrier oils and butters called for in my blood orange soap recipe.

Heat until melted then set aside.

Allow the lye-water and the melted soapmaking oils to cool to around 95°F. Once they’ve reached this temperature, you’re ready to make soap.

Weigh out the sodium lactate and stir it into the cooled lye-water.

This blood orange soap recipe is made with real orange powder and blood orange essential oil. Blood orange essential oil has anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make this blood orange soap recipe especially suitable for acne prone and combination skin.

Then weigh out the pink salt, essential oils and orange powder. Add these ingredients to the soapmaking oils/butters. Then, using a stick/hand blender, thoroughly mix the ingredients into the soapmaking fats. (Alternately you can add the essential oils once your soap reaches a light trace.)

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the melted oils.

Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace then evenly pour the blood orange soap batter into the molds’ cavities.

If you blood orange soap gels, you should be able to remove the soap from your molds the next day or the day after. If your soap doesn’t gel, or it’s still soft the next day, wait 2-4 days before unmolding.

Allow your homemade blood orange soap bars to cure 4-6 weeks.

If desired, you can paint your homemade soaps after they have cured.

This blood orange soap recipe is made with real orange powder and blood orange essential oil. Blood orange essential oil has anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make this blood orange soap recipe especially suitable for acne prone and combination skin.

To do this, combine mica powder in your choice of color to a small dish. Slowly add isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to the mica powder, mixing with a small brush. You don’t want to add too much alcohol or the mica will be translucent on your soap. But you don’t want to add too little as the mica will clump on the soap. You want a paint-like texture that flows easily off the brush.

I used an orange vibrance mica powder to paint the tops and sides of my soap bars. (Alternately you can tint your soaps with mica powder by adding two to four teaspoons of mica powder to your soapmaking oils and mix prior to adding the lye-water.)

This blood orange soap recipe is made with real orange powder and blood orange essential oil. Blood orange essential oil has anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make this blood orange soap recipe especially suitable for acne prone and combination skin.

Once the orange mica “paint” dried on my soap, I used candy apple red mica powder to paint designs on my soap bars and allowed them to dry.

Once you’ve decorated your own soaps, carefully wrap your blood orange soaps tightly in foodservice film. You can then label your soaps as desired for personal use or gifting.

If you’re planning to sell your blood orange soaps, you’ll need to label them according to FDA guidelines. Not sure how to label your homemade soaps? I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

To discover more of my homemade soap recipes and tutorials, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board and my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts from Soap Deli News blog to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.

Also, don’t forget. If you make homemade soaps or bath & body products I will be featuring your creations on Soap Deli News blog on my weekend wrap up posts! Simply add the hashtag #soapdelishowoff to your instagram and twitter posts for a chance to have your handmade products featured!


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Green Apple Soap Recipe with Real Apple Powder + Apricot Kernel Oil

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder.

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder. Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin's look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin’s look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder. Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin's look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

Green Apple Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

 4.8 oz. apricot kernel oil
4.8 oz. sesame oil
3.2 oz. hemp oil
1.6 oz. castor oil
8 oz. refined coconut oil
4.8 oz. refined shea butter
4.8 oz. sal butter

9.75 oz. distilled water
4.35 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1.6 oz. apple powder
1 oz. sodium lactate (60% solution)
2 oz. green apple fragrance oil
.15 oz. Alpine Green mica powder

Soap Notes:

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder. Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin's look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

I’ve included a screenshot from SoapCalc (above) to make resizing my green apple soap recipe easier. It also gives you an idea of the overall soap bar quality. (SoapCalc is great tool for anyone wanting to create their own custom soap recipes from scratch. You can learn how to create your own custom soap recipes using a lye calculator here.)

Because my green apple soap recipe is palm free, I did a steeper water discount than normal and included sodium lactate in the soap recipe to get a harder bar.

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder. Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin's look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

I used two different molds for this recipe – a Crafter’s Choice basic round soap mold and a silicone flower blossom mold. If you use the round soap mold you’ll get about nine 5 oz. soap bars. Alternately my green apple soap recipe will yield around eleven or twelve 4 oz. bars.

Instructions:

You should be familiar with making cold process soap before trying my green apple soap recipe. If you’ve never made cold process soap before – or any kind of soap in which you’re working with lye – I strongly recommend you start with a beginner soap recipe so you get a feel for the process and know you can create a successful soap. Otherwise, you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions to create this soap. You should adhere to all basic safety precautions when working with lye.

Begin by measuring out the amount of water called for in the recipe into a heat safe container. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye.

Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area. Stir the lye until it has dissolved, then set the lye-water aside.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking fats – these are all of the carrier oils and butters called for in my homemade green apple soap recipe.

Heat until melted then set aside.

Allow the lye-water and the melted soapmaking oils to cool to around 95°F. Once they’ve reached this temperature, you’re ready to make soap.

Weigh out the sodium lactate and stir it into the cooled lye-water.

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder. Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin's look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

Then weigh out the apple powder, mica and the fragrance oil. Add these ingredients to the melted oils and mix to combine with a stick/hand blender. (Alternately you can add the fragrance oil at trace.)

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the melted oils.

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder. Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin's look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

Mix with a stick blender until you reach trace then evenly pour the green apple soap batter into the molds’ cavities. Sprinkle on dried rose petals if desired, then cover with plastic film or parchment paper and set aside in a safe location.

If you green apple soap gels, you should be able to remove the soap from your molds the next day or the day after. If your soap doesn’t gel, or it’s still soft the next day, wait 2-4 days before unmolding. If you’re using the round mold for this soap, it’s a bit trickier getting this soap out of the mold perfectly if it’s softer. So either give this mold more time or pop the mold into the freezer for a half hour or so prior to unmolding the soap.

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder. Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin's look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

Allow your homemade green apple soap bars to cure 4-6 weeks. Once your soaps have cured, they are ready for use. Simply wrap and label as desired for personal use or gifting. You can also bevel the edges with a potato peeler if desired.

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder. Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin's look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

For more ways to create this soap, you can embed soap mustaches into your soap bars for Father’s Day gifts or even soap roses for wedding favors.

This yogurt & banana soap recipe with organic flax seed oil is formulated especially for dry skin with real banana powder and yogurt. It's made using the cold process soapmaking method with the end product yielding a high conditioning / low cleansing soap bar.

If you like my homemade green apple soap recipe, then you may also like my chia & charcoal soap recipe made with soothing and hydrating chia seed oil and naturally detoxifying activated charcoal as well as my yogurt & banana soap recipe made with organic flax seed oil and yogurt & banana powders.

Learn how to make this homemade green apple soap recipe! Crafted using the cold process soapmaking method, this green apple soap recipe is made using real apple powder. Apple powder is naturally rich in alpha-hydroxy acids that can help to improve skin texture. In addition to rejuvenating skin's look and texture, it also helps to promote skin elasticity and has moisturizing properties. These properties make this green apple soap recipe particularly suitable for dry or mature skin.

If you’re planning to sell your green apple soaps, be sure to label them according to FDA guidelines. Not sure how to label your creations? I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

For even more of my soap recipes and tutorials, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board and my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts from Soap Deli News blog to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.

Do you make homemade soaps or bath & body products? Want to see your homemade soaps and bath & body products featured on Soap Deli News blog? Simply add the hashtag #soapdelishowoff to your instagram and twitter posts for a chance to have your handmade products featured on my weekend wrap up posts!


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

Homemade Chia & Charcoal Soap Recipe

Disclosure: Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.

This homemade chia & charcoal soap recipe is made with soothing and hydrating chia seed oil and naturally detoxifying activated charcoal.

This homemade chia & charcoal soap recipe is palm free and is made with chia seed oil, activated charcoal and Australian midnight black clay.

As I’ve aged – 42 this coming June! – my skin has gotten more particular. Dry and irritated skin has become a more common occurrence. Unfortunately, adult acne is also a thing. And it hates me. Especially when the hormones are going crazy or I’m overly stressed. My chia & charcoal soap recipe is my solution for keeping my skin happy.

I chose to use chia seed oil in this soap recipe as it is rich in essential fatty acids, powerful antioxidants and phytonutrients that are prized in anti-aging skin care products. I also included walnut oil in this soap formulation for it’s value in skin care – specifically its moisturizing and skin soothing properties.

I then combined these ingredients with neem oil and activated charcoal to help fight and prevent acne. A little bit of Australian midnight black clay also plays a role and helps give this homemade soap a boost to it’s beautiful dark gray/black color that I accented with a pink rose.

As my chia & charcoal soap is palm free, I decided to give candelilla wax a place in this recipe for a harder bar. As I know I do have vegan readers, I chose to use this wax over beeswax. It was a little tricky to work with as it’s such a hard wax, but luckily this recipe turned out beautifully.

You’ll find that my chia & charcoal soap recipe yields a medium-hard bar with strong bubbles, but still a lower cleansing level. I bumped the superfat on this one up to 8% to make the bar a little more conditioning. I think this soap is great for those days leading up to and during a break out as a facial soap as well as during hot months when I’m sweating more and producing more oil and struggling with acne in those annoying places like under my chin, around my hairline and across my upper back.

Following is my chia & charcoal soap recipe. I hope you like it!

This chia & charcoal soap recipe is made with chia seed oil, activated charcoal and black clay for maturing, combination and acne prone skin.

Homemade Chia & Charcoal Soap Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

1.6 oz./45 grams (5%) castor oil
3.2 oz./90.7 grams (10%) extra virgin chia seed oil
.65 oz./18.1 grams (2%) candelilla wax
8 oz./226.8 grams (25%) refined coconut oil
3.2 oz./90.7 grams (10%) neem oil
13.75 oz./390 grams (43%) pomace olive oil
1.6 oz./45.3 grams (5%) walnut oil

9.75 oz./276.6 grams distilled water (30.5% of oil weight)
4.2 oz./120 grams lye/sodium hydroxide (8% superfat)

1 oz./28.3 grams sodium lactate (60% solution)
.55 oz./15.5 grams coconut activated charcoal (1 Tbs per pound)
1.1 oz./31.1 grams Australian midnight black clay (.5 Tbs per pound)
.05 oz./1.4 grams fine grain pink Himalayan salt (about 1/4 teaspoon)
up to 2 oz./56.7 grams fragrance oil, optional (1 oz. per pound)

Instructions:

I scented my chia & charcoal soap with a combination of two fragrance oils that were close to empty. I used .95 oz. of cardamom mocha fragrance oil with the last .4 oz. of my chocolate fragrance oil. It basically smells like yummy chocolates without being overpowering, but it was enough that it covered the smell of the neem oil.

I premade the pink roses for this soap using some of the leftover soap batter from my donut soap recipe here and a Wilton small rose silicone mold.

For the main soap bars, I used two Crafter’s Choice basic round soap molds. My chia & charcoal soap recipe yields about nine soap bars weighing just over 5 oz. each with the embeds.

As stated previously, working with the candelilla wax was a little challenging as I’d never worked with it before. Therefore I don’t recommend making my chia & charcoal soap recipe unless you have soapmaking experience under your belt. (If you’re looking to get started making cold process soap for the first time, I recommend you start with a beginner soap recipe.) Otherwise, you’ll follow your basic cold process soapmaking instructions to create this soap, but mix the lye/water and soapmaking fats at a higher temperature due to the wax.

Begin by measuring out the amount of water called for in the recipe into a heat safe container. Next, use a digital scale to weigh out the lye.

Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area. Stir the lye until it has dissolved, then set the lye-water aside.

Next, weigh out the soapmaking fats – these are all of the carrier oils and the wax called for in my chia & charcoal soap recipe. I combined these in a stainless steel pot and heated them on the stove over medium heat.

But – this is where it goes a little sideways. I’d never used a wax this hard in soap before. So my oils started to bubble before my candelilla wax melted. When this happened I basically just kept stirring the oil, which prevented it from bubbling and boiling. When the candelilla wax was almost entirely melted, I turned off the heat but left the pot on the stove. I continued to stir until the rest of the wax melted, then removed the pot from heat.

So, two things. First, I really recommend using a stainless steel pot to heat the soapmaking fats and mix the soap batter because of the higher temperature. Secondly, you may find using a double boiler is a much better way to melt the wax. (Or I welcome your suggestions in the comments!)

Allow your soapmaking fats and the lye-water to cool to around 115°F. Once they’ve reached this temperature, you’re ready to make soap.

Weigh out the sodium lactate and the salt and stir it into the cooled lye-water.

Then weigh out the activated charcoal, black clay and the fragrance oil, if desired. Add these ingredients to the melted oils and wax and mix to combine with a stick/hand blender.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the melted oils.

Mix with a stick blender on the lower setting until you reach trace, then keep going. You want a heavy trace for this recipe because of the wax to ensure you don’t get a false trace. Once you’re certain your soap batter has traced, evenly pour the chia & charcoal soap batter into the cavities of your round soap molds.

Now firmly press your premade roses into the tops of the soap in your molds’ cavities.

Cover if desired with plastic film or parchment paper and set aside in a safe location.

Your chia & charcoal soap bars should release easily from your molds the next day even if it doesn’t gel. If they don’t, simply wait another day or two.

This chia & charcoal soap recipe is made with chia seed oil, activated charcoal and black clay for maturing, combination and acne prone skin.

Allow your chia & charcoal soap bars to cure 4-6 weeks. Once your soaps have cured, they are ready for use. Simply wrap and label as desired for personal use or gifting.

If you’re planning to sell your chia & charcoal soaps, be sure to label them according to FDA guidelines. Not sure how to label your creations? I highly recommend the book, Soap and Cosmetic Labeling: How to Follow the Rules and Regs Explained in Plain English, by Marie Gale.

For even more of my soap recipes and tutorials, be sure to follow my Simply Soapmaking Pinterest board and my DIY Bath and Body Pinterest board. You can also find and follow me on G+TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. Or sign up to receive new posts from Soap Deli News blog to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.