Homemade Callus Treatment Balm Recipe (Or how to avoid a traumatic foot care experience.)

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Before you fall down that foot care rabbit hole and are ushered into an unforgettable foot care mishap by slapping on a shiny new set of foot peeling shoes, you’re going to want to read this article. Then craft up your own batch of this homemade callus treatment balm recipe to naturally promote foot health and banish tough calluses for good.

Homemade callus treatment balm recipe! Before you fall down that foot care rabbit hole and are ushered into an unforgettable foot care mishap by slapping on a shiny new set of foot peeling shoes, you're going to want to read this article. Then craft up your own batch of this homemade callus treatment balm recipe to naturally promote foot health and banish tough calluses for good.

No one wants ugly feet. Especially not when summer weather hits. We want our feet to look as awesome as those new sandals we just bought this season. What we DON’T want, however, is a YouTube video of us on a bus peeling skin off our feet. (…and then eating it.)

The horror of that video has since inspired me to experiment with various foot care products. It’s the unforeseen consequences of these products that led to my development of a homemade callus treatment balm.

Women don’t want funky feet. They don’t want you to have them either.

We’ve all heard the negative comments about feet when the weather heats up. Socks and sneakers are replaced with sandals and we tend to see a lot of chunky yellowed calluses, fungus infested toenails and the like. Women especially, I think, enjoy the gossip. Perhaps to feel better about themselves. Or maybe just because they really are completely and totally grossed out.

I remember when I worked on the farmer’s market many years ago. I overheard all kinds of remarks about unfit feet. Typically men were the brunt of these insulting observations. I imagine it’s because men in general don’t care as much about what other people think. If they did they wouldn’t wear socks with sandals, right? (wink. wink.)

I think that we, as women, tend to be more conscious of our own foot health. Many of us were raised to put more into our appearance than men were as children. And for the most part, I don’t see a lot of women wearing sandals if they have funky feet. With the hundreds to thousands of foot care care products marketed to women everyday, the money we’re willing to spend on foot health becomes more evident.

From foot scrubs, sprays, masks and soaks to pumice stones, foot butters and even foot peeling shoes, I’m always discovering new products for foot care. There’s in fact an entire aisle dedicated to just foot care products at my local Ulta.

Foot peeling shoes fall into two categories – effective and completely disgusting.

One of the stranger foot care products I’ve tried are the Tony Moly Foot Peeling Shoes. This liquid foot care product contains lactic acid, salicylic acid and a blend of plant based extracts to remove keratin from your feet. Thickened keratin or calluses, which is medically referred to as hyperkeratosis, peels off of feet when this product is applied within four to six days.

Similar to, but less expensive than, other foot peeling masks on the market, Tony Moly has seen increased popularity with the rise of the Korean skin care and beauty trend.

I first tried Tony Moly’s magic changing foot peeling shoes last year. Freaked out by some of the reviews and photos of excessive peeling, I followed the directions on using this product to a T. I left the foot peeling shoes on for an hour and a half, then washed and dried my feet as indicated.

However, before I reached the four to six day peeling period, I exfoliated my feet daily with the Earth Therapeutics Diamond File to remove excess skin and minimize peeling as much as possible. (You know. Because I had places to go and people to see.)

The product performed okay. There was no vomit inducing horror show on my feet after use, which I was happy about. I simply couldn’t imagine my feet recovering from some of the images I’ve seen from use of this type of product. (Google at your own risk.) I’ve used the foot peeling shoes twice since then.

With the arrival of spring I thought I’d give these foot peeling shoes another try. The weather has gone from spring temperatures straight to middle of August heat a few times already. Wanting to avoid any criticism of my forty plus year old feet – feet do weird things after forty – I placed an order with Ulta and waited for my Tony Moly foot peeling shoes to arrive.

I used my Tony Moly Foot Peeling Shoes within the past week or so. I cut the foot peeling shoes open and stuck one onto each foot. Each shoe was then held closed with the provided stickers. While the shoes did their thing, I did mine. I worked on social media for my blog. I made lunch. I walked around in those shoes – though cautiously on the stairs since I have a habit of falling down them.

Decorate the amber glass jars for your homemade herbal salves and balms with washi tape or stickers for a personal touch when gift giving!

Then Jasper, my dachshund, decided he needed to go outside. Jasper is not one who’s often willing to wait for me to primp. He’s basically a spoiled child in dog form. If he doesn’t get his way he will yell (bark) at you until he does. And if you tick him off, well. Let’s just say he will pee in all the wrong places.

There was no way however that I was going to make it out of the house in those foot peeling shoes. Our side door exits onto gravel and grass and dirt. And Jasper is finicky about where he’ll lay his load. So I removed the foot peeling shoes. I wiped my feet off with a tea towel, slid on a pair of flip flops and off we went.

My day resumed as usual after that. Work and dinner. I caught up on the new season of The Handmaid’s Tale on Hulu. I went to bed, got up, showered. That’s about when I realized I’d forgotten to wash off the residue from the foot peeling shoes. Oops.

A few days later the skin peeling commenced. It was the stuff of nightmarish google images – so totally gross. I would walk around the house leaving bits of dead skin everywhere. My roommate started having nightmares about her own feet peeling. So much in fact, she was peeling off dead skin in her dreams only to hit a road block that required scissors. Yes, scissors!

I alternated back and forth being using my diamond file and moisturizing – day in and day out. Until finally – FINALLY! – my feet started to resemble the feet of a normal human again. That’s when I decided to make a homemade callus treatment balm.

(And let me just say, this new guy I’ve been dating is on a whole new level of comfortable with me after this experience. Get your introduction here.)

Homemade Callus Treatment Balm Recipe! Before you fall down that foot care rabbit hole and are ushered into an unforgettable foot care mishap by slapping on a shiny new set of foot peeling shoes, you're going to want to read this article. Then craft up your own batch of this homemade callus treatment balm recipe to naturally promote foot health and banish tough calluses for good.

About my homemade callus treatment balm.

I formulated my homemade callus treatment balm using natural skin conditioning carrier oils like coconut oil and camelina seed oil. These oils were then combined with turmeric root powder and a blend of organic essential oils proven to minimize inflammation caused by calluses while also encouraging blood flow, fading discoloration and softening the build up of tough skin.

Essential oils such as tea tree oil and oregano essential oil also help to prevent and treat common fungal infections you get on your feet, including athlete’s foot, toenail fungus and fungus caused by candida.

Homemade callus treatment balm recipe! Before you fall down that foot care rabbit hole and are ushered into an unforgettable foot care mishap by slapping on a shiny new set of foot peeling shoes, you're going to want to read this article. Then craft up your own batch of this homemade callus treatment balm recipe to naturally promote foot health and banish tough calluses for good.

Homemade Callus Treatment Balm Recipe

© Rebecca D. Dillon

Ingredients:

1 oz. refined coconut oil
1 oz. safflower oil
1 oz. natural beeswax pastilles
.75 oz. sunflower oil
.25 oz. camelina seed oil
.025 oz. turmeric root powder
12 drops tea tree essential oil
12 drops chamomile essential oil (3% dilution)
12 drops oregano essential oil
12 drops lavender essential oil

Instructions:

Weigh out the ingredients.

Using a digital scale (I use this Baker’s Math Scale for all my bath, body and homemade soap recipes) weigh out the carrier oils, beeswax and turmeric root powder.

Melt the ingredients.

Combine the oils, beeswax and turmeric in a double boiler and gently heat until the beeswax has completely melted. Remove from heat.

Add the essential oils.

Using a graduated transfer pipette or dropper, add the essential oils to the melted homemade callus treatment balm ingredients. Stir to combine.

If desired you can omit the turmeric root powder and use turmeric essential oil in place of the lavender or chamomile essential oil.

Pour into containers.

Now pour your homemade callus treatment balm into clear or amber glass jars. Once cool, screw on the lids for each jar.

Decorate the amber glass jars for your homemade herbal salves and balms with washi tape or stickers for a personal touch when gift giving!

Decorate or label your jars.

I used two 2.3 oz. thick wall glass cosmetic jars for my homemade callus treatment balms, then decorated the outside of the jars with decorative washi tape. Washi tape and stickers are a fun way to give your balms a personalized homemade look for gifting.

Use your homemade callus treatment balm.

To use simply apply your homemade callus treatment balm after bathing or soaking feet, then exfoliating with a pumice smoothing stone or diamond file. (Note that this product may stain light colored clothing.) 

More natural foot care recipes.

If you’re a fan of my homemade callus treatment balm, then you may also want to try my other natural foot care recipes.

Pedi Foot Scrub Recipe with Coconut Oil! This super exfoliating pedi foot scrub recipe with coconut oil will leave your feet feeling like you just had a professional spa pedicure! Made with all natural ingredients, this pedi foot scrub exfoliates with fine sea salt and pumice. It then hydrates skin with shea butter and coconut oil for softer, smoother feet with every use!

Have you tried foot peeling shoes?

If you’ve tried foot peeling shoes, I’d love to hear your experience! I’d be delighted if you shared your story in the comments.

Keep in contact.

For more natural skin care recipes be sure to  find and follow Soap Deli News across all of your favorite social media platforms including G+, PinterestFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. You can also subscribe to Soap Deli News via email for future updates, DIY projects and recipes.

This article is not intended to provide diagnosis, treatment or medical advice and is provided for informational purposes only. Information on products mentioned are based on my own personal experience and have not been evaluated by the FDA. Please consult a physician prior to making any changes that may impact your health.

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Exfoliating Microdermabrasion Scrub Recipe for Acne Prone and Combination Skin

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

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Check out this AMAZING DIY beauty hack for making your own exfoliating microdermabrasion scrub recipe for acne prone and combination skin! It contains just TWO ingredients to save you money over expensive commercial options and it doubles as an anti-acne face mask!

Ever wanted to make your own microdermabrasion scrub recipe but without potentially skin irritating baking soda? Then you need to check out this amazing DIY beauty hack for making your own exfoliating microdermabrasion scrub recipe for acne prone and combination skin! This simple and all natural microdermabrasion scrub recipe contains just TWO ingredients to help you save money over expensive commercial options. Plus it doubles as an anti-acne face mask!

I received a sample of dr. brandt® microdermabrasion skin exfoliant in my Birchbox this past October to try. I really liked it but the retail price on this product is $79 for 2 oz. and terribly out of my price range. So I kind of nixed the idea of microdermabrasion for a while. Then, during a rather pesky routine hormone induced break out, I decided to experiment with the Rocky Mountain Essentials Tuxedo Teeth Whitener and Detoxifier that I had in my bathroom closet.

This all natural, organic teeth whitener contains only coconut shell charcoal, calcium bentonite clay, organic mint and organic orange peel. Activated charcoal, of course, is known for it's detoxifying properties and is a common ingredient in anti-acne masks along with bentonite clay so it can double as an anti-acne face mask!

This all natural, organic teeth whitener contains only coconut shell activated charcoal, calcium bentonite clay, organic mint and organic orange peel. Activated charcoal, of course, is known for it’s detoxifying properties and is a common ingredient in anti-acne masks along with bentonite clay. I figured it’d be perfect as a face mask.

So, while in the shower the other day, I put a small amount of the Tuxedo Teeth Whitener and Detoxifier in the palm of my hand and added just enough water to make a paste. Then I massaged it onto my face in a circular motion. To both my surprise and my delight the paste felt exactly like a microdermabrasion product! So not only was I able to exfoliate my skin, I was also able to leave the product on my face as a mask for 5-10 minutes to help relieve my acne break out. It was as easy as that.

If, however, you’d like something a little more substantial than water to mix with the tooth powder, you can also mix it with skin friendly anti-aging oils like jojoba, rosehip seed or argan oil. Another good option would be to mix it with soothing (cooled) chamomile tea or aloe vera juice. Then simply use once or twice a week as needed to maintain skin.

If you prefer to premix your microdermabrasion scrub, here’s a simple recipe to get you started. (If you prefer to use aloe vera juice, water, milk or even yogurt don’t pre-mix your microdermabrasion scrub as water based ingredients can lead to bacteria and mold formation.)

Check out this AMAZING DIY beauty hack for making your own exfoliating microdermabrasion scrub recipe for acne prone and combination skin! It contains just TWO ingredients to save you money over expensive commercial options and it doubles as an anti-acne face mask!

Exfoliating Microdermabrasion Scrub Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

.1 oz. Rocky Mountain Essentials Tuxedo Teeth Whitener + Detoxifier
.65 oz. distilled water
.25 oz. jojoba, rosehip seed or argan oil

Instructions:

I weighed out the ingredients using a digital scale. However, you don’t have to weigh the ingredients out. If you don’t have a scale simply add a small amount of oil to the teeth whitener powder until it forms a paste. Otherwise, weigh out the ingredients and mix together. Be sure to use a non-metal utensil and bowl to mix the microdermabrasion scrub recipe as metal deactivates the properties of the bentonite clay (an ingredient in the Tuxedo teeth whitener.).

If desired, you can also mix in up to 12 drops of your favorite essential oil(s) into your microdermabrasion scrub. You can also substitute part of the carrier oil in this recipe with neem oil. In which case I’d recommend using essential oils – a lavender and tea tree essential oil combo would work great for this! – to hide the smell of the neem oil. Neem oil has been known to help to relieve acne, psoriasis, eczema, dry skin, dandruff, skin ulcers, warts, and other skin conditions when applied either directly or into soaps, lotions, and creams.

Hot tip! Add .15 oz. of polysorbate 80 to this recipe to make removal of the product easier. Without it, it’s a little tough to wash off.

Once you’ve mixed up your face scrub, refill your empty jar of Tuxedo teeth whitener and detoxifier with the microdermabrasion scrub. Alternately you can also use a 2 oz. glass salve jar.

You’re new microdermabrasion face scrub is now ready to use!

To use your scrub, simply apply a quarter sized amount to your wet face and massage in a circular motion avoiding your eye area. If desired, leave on skin for 5-10 minutes afterward to use as a mask. Finally, rinse the scrub off completely using warm water and pat dry. Be sure to then follow with your favorite moisturizer or anti-wrinkle face serum.

Created as a dupe to the clariSEA Deep Pore Detox Activated Charcoal Exfoliating Mask, this activated charcoal detox mask recipe draws out impurities, clears up blackheads and removes excess oil for reduced breakouts and faster healing times.

For more anti-acne skin care recipes that contain activated charcoal including homemade soap, mask and face scrub recipes, visit Soap Deli News blog here.

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Tea Tree and Sea Mud Soap Recipe

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

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Tea Tree & Sea Mud Soap Recipe! This gorgeous homemade soap DIY is the product of a soapmaking experiment that failed and was then reinvented into the gorgeous soap you see here. Find the soapmaking recipe to create the success now at Soap Deli News blog and learn how to turn your soapmaking fail into a success worthy of gifting!

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a soap fail into a soapmaking success! Keep reading to learn how I turned my soap fail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

Silicone Ice Cube Mold from Target

I knew I wanted to make a melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soap recipe. And I also wanted to try out a silicone mold that I’d purchased at Target. The plan was to have “strips” of sea mud in the melt and pour soaps.

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

Unfortunately, I did not account for the sea mud soap embeds separating into the melted glycerin soap I poured around them in the mold. So essentially, I ended up with soap that, as it was cooling, looked like poop separating in a toilet bowl.

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

Nor were the finished soaps very attractive either.

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

As I was using melt and pour soap, I simply cut the soaps into chunks and reheated them in the microwave.

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

Then I poured the melted soap into my molds again. This time, however, I did not fill the mold cavities up completely. Once there was a “skin” on the surface of the soap I was ready to add my fix.

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

I then melted a white melt and pour soap base and added a forest green liquid soap colorant to it. I poured some of this new soap on top of the soap mixed with sea mud in the molds. I used a utensil to “lift” some of the sea mud soap from the bottom of the mold and mixed it into the top. I then place the soap in the fridge to cool further.

Next, I added turquoise mica to the rest of the melted soap base I previously added the forest green liquid soap colorant to and mixed it in. I allowed it to cool just to the point before it hardened, but I was still able to pour it.

I then poured the turquoise colored soap on top of the soap in the fridge and again used a utensil to pull more of the sea mud soap to the top so it all swirled together. Then I waited.

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

Once my soaps had hardened completely, I removed them from the refrigerator.

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

I then removed the individual soaps from my silicone mold cavities and used a knife to trim off the excess around the top from my pours.

Tea Tree & Sea Mud Soap Recipe! This gorgeous homemade soap DIY is the product of a soapmaking experiment that failed and was then reinvented into the gorgeous soap you see here. Find the soapmaking recipe to create the success now at Soap Deli News blog and learn how to turn your soapmaking fail into a success worthy of gifting!

Tea Tree and Sea Mud Soap Recipe // Learn how to make this easy melt and pour soap recipe plus learn how I turned a soapmaking fail into a soapmaking success!

I then used a potato peeler to bevel the edges of the soaps.

Tea Tree & Sea Mud Soap Recipe! This gorgeous homemade soap DIY is the product of a soapmaking experiment that failed and was then reinvented into the gorgeous soap you see here. Find the soapmaking recipe to create the success now at Soap Deli News blog and learn how to turn your soapmaking fail into a success worthy of gifting!

Tea Tree and Sea Mud Soap Recipe // Plus how to turn a soap fail into a soap success!

Then all that was left to do was to wrap my completed tea tree and sea mud soaps in foodservice film!

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

And my #soapfail was now a #soapsuccess!

To make your own tea tree and sea mud soap, simply follow my revised tea tree and sea mud soap recipe below.

As a crafter and soapmaker, there are absolutely those days when an idea for a soap recipe you have in your head, does not execute the way you thought it would. This was one of those projects. However, with a little creativity, I was able to turn a #soapfail into a #soapsuccess! Learn how I turned my #soapfail around and find out how to make your own melt and pour tea tree and sea mud soaps!

Tea Tree & Sea Mud Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

22 oz. aloe vera & olive oil glycerin melt and pour soap base
4.2 oz. basic white melt and pour soap base
3.75 oz. dry sea clay
1.2 oz. tea tree oil
.1 oz. lavender essential oil
forest green liquid soap colorant
turquoise mica

Instructions:

Using a digital scale, weigh out 22 oz. of the aloe vera and olive oil melt and pour soap base. Cut into chunks, then heat in the microwave in 30 second increments. Stir in between heatings until the soap has melted fully.

Now weigh out the sea mud and stir into the melted soap base. Do the same with the essential oils.

Place your Ozera 6-Cavity Silicone Soap Mold onto a cutting board.

Now pour the melted soap evenly into each of the cavities leaving space on top to add the colored soap.

Once a “skin” forms on the top of the soap you are ready for your next soap.

Now weigh out 4.2 oz. of the basic white soap base. Cut it into chunks and heat in the microwave, in 30 second increments, until melted.

Add the forest green soap soap colorant to the melted soap, a drop at a time, until you reach the desired color.

Now pour part of the green tinted soap base on top of the soap mixed with sea mud in the molds. Use a fork or chopstick to “lift” some of the sea mud soap from the bottom of the mold and mix it into the top.

Using the cutting board for support, transfer the soap into your refrigerator to cool further.

Now add turquoise mica to the green tinted soap to suit and mix well. Once it starts to set up, but is still pourable, pour the turquoise colored soap on top of the soap in the fridge. Use a fork or chopstick to pull more of the sea mud soap from the bottom of the mold cavities to the top and swirl it slightly until you’ve achieved your desired effect.

Once your tea tree and sea mud soaps have solidified, remove them from the mold cavities, trim the edges, then wrap tightly in foodservice film until use.

For more of my homemade soap recipes, be sure to follow my DIY Bath and Body board and my Simply Soapmaking board on Pinterest. You can also find and follow me on G+,TumblrFacebookTwitterBlog Lovin’, and Instagram. You can also sign up to receive new posts to your email via FeedBurner so you never miss a post. You can also gain access to more detailed information and step-by-step photos of new projects by becoming my patron on Patreon.

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Neem Oil & Tea Tree Foot Scrub Recipe

I may receive compensation from links on this site. See my disclosure policy.

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This natural neem oil and tea tree foot scrub recipe helps keep feet looking great with exfoliating salt and pumice and anti-fungal neem and tea tree oils.

This natural neem oil & tea tree foot scrub recipe helps keep feet looking and feeling great year round! Natural salts and fine ground pumice exfoliate dead skin cells and rough calluses while gentle kaolin clay helps to detox skin. In addition, naturally anti-fungal neem oil and tea tea tree oil work together in this neem oil & tea tree foot scrub recipe to help keep feet fungus free or to aid in clearing up any existing conditions like toe nail fungus or athlete’s foot!

This natural neem oil and tea tree foot scrub recipe helps keep feet looking great with exfoliating salt and pumice and anti-fungal neem and tea tree oils.

Natural Neem Oil & Tea Tree Foot Scrub Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

2.4 oz. dead sea salt (or fine pink Himalayan salt)
6.5 oz. pumice powder
3.6 oz. Epsom salt
.3 oz. kaolin (white cosmetic) clay
2.5 oz. safflower oil
2.5 oz. hemp seed oil
.5 oz. neem oil
4 mL tea tree oil
2 mL lemongrass, rosemary or lavender essential oil

Instructions:

Using a digital scale weigh out salt, pumice and clay into a large glass bowl. Mix well.

In a separate container weigh out the safflower, hemp seed and neem oils. Then using a graduated transfer pipette, measure out the essential oils and stir into the oil mixture.

This natural neem oil and tea tree foot scrub recipe helps keep feet looking great with exfoliating salt and pumice and anti-fungal neem and tea tree oils.

Slowly pour the dry ingredients into the oil mixture, using a fork to whisk the ingredients together as you go. Once the ingredients for this neem oil and tea tree foot scrub recipe are thoroughly combined, spoon into an 16 oz. jar. (I used an 16 oz. straight sided amber plastic jar with a black smooth plastic lined cap from SKS Bottle & Packaging. You can purchase these jars in bulk for homemade gifts or for packaging for products you are making to sell here.)

Now screw the lid onto your jar and label as desired.

Use this foot scrub daily in the bath or shower by massaging onto wet feet then rinsing and patting dry. Then follow with my natural foot repair salve recipe with neem oil. You’ll love how soft your skin feels afterwards! Plus, because this neem oil and tea tree foot scrub recipe is made using fine ground pumice, you can also use it as natural body scrub to exfoliate and soften other rough or dry skin areas.

If you’re selling this neem oil and tea tree foot scrub, be sure to label your product to FDA guidelines. It’s also highly recommended you use a preservative in this product to prevent mold and bacteria should water be introduced into the product during normal use. You may also want to consider using either vitamin E or rosemary extract to help extend the shelf life of the oils used.

For even more of my natural skin care recipes be sure to follow me on Pinterest for collections of my favorite bath and beauty recipes from around the web.

Discover all of all my new beauty and skin care recipes by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ or Tumblr. Or find and follow me on FacebookTwitter, G+ and Instagram.

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Don’t be a stinker!

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Our neighborhood is a haven for skunks. At least once a week you can smell them lurking around, probably ticked off by a neighbor’s dog or a car that cut too close. Last week I was taking my miniature doxie, Jasper, out for a 3am pee just as a fat and happy skunk came waddling down the driveway. Needless to say Jasper and I both went back the way we came and I ended up taking him out at the back of the house. Despite their distinctive and downright disgusting odor, there seems to be a niche market for those with a fascination for skunks. From amusing stuffed animals to home decor to clothing and costumes to art, these woodland creatures might actually be charming if they didn’t smell so bad.
Of course, we ourselves, don’t like to smell bad either. So we tackle the dirt with soaps and body washes, and of course deodorant. Not all deodorants are created equal though, and many of us are becoming more consciousness about what type of ingredients we put on our skin. There’s long been a debate about the use of aluminum in antiperspirant, but finding a deodorant that can kick the stink? Well, that can sometimes be a challenge. So here’s a simple, handmade Quick Stick Deodorant recipe from Little House in the Suburbs Blog. Just click here for the full how to. It’s made using natural baking soda, cornstarch, tea tree essential oil, and a tiny bit of coconut oil pressed into an empty deodorant container. Now you can wear a natural deodorant and not be a stinker.