Growing a Container Garden: From Bush Cucumbers to Herbs and Fruits

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Don’t have the time to till a garden bed or just don’t have the space? Even if you don’t have a yard you can still grow vegetables for your table! I went down to the Roanoke City Market over the weekend itching to buy something other than herbs that I could grow in a pot. The solution? Bush cucumbers!
After talking to Tim of Rolling Meadows Farms I purchased some bush cucumbers from him, then transplanted half into a large container. (As they grow I’ll probably split these again into a second container.) The other half I left for my mom to plant in a container somewhere she could place up high so the deer couldn’t eat her crop this year like they did last year. Apparently bush cucumbers are perfect for containers. They’ll also produce cucumbers a lot sooner than cucumber plants that grow on vines. Just make sure to place your container of bush cucumber plants in full sun and keep watered.
Cucumbers aren’t the only things you can grow in containers though. There are a long list of fruits that can be grown in pots like strawberries and kumquats, and veggies like summer squash, tomatoes, acorn and pumpkin squashes, hot peppers, sweet peppers, small melons, and of course herbs and many greens. Be sure to check out TLC’s article, 66 Things You Can Grow at Home: In Containers, Without a Garden, for a fairly substantial list.

And, if you’re looking to deter pests and diseases in your garden – however you choose to grow one – I highly recommend taking a peek at the article, 35 Pest and Disease Remedies, from Fine Gardening Magazine. It offers some great recipes for keeping your garden looking great with ingredients from your kitchen! For even more great gardening ideas, be sure to check out my Gardening Board on Pinterest.
What types of plants are you going to be growing in your garden this year?