Hydrating Bastille Soap Recipe Plus Practical Tips on Flu Prevention

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What’s the story with the coronavirus? Is it really worth a full on toilet paper war? And more importantly, how can I protect myself from the coronavirus and diminish my chances of getting sick? Learn why the coronavirus shouldn’t be dismissed as your average flu. Plus easy, everyday tips on reducing your chances of becoming infected with COVID-19. I’m also sharing my favorite, hydrating Bastille soap recipe. It’s perfect for dry hand relief from overuse of cheap liquid hand soap and alcohol based hand sanitizers. Plus it’s the perfect project (new hobby?) to make while practicing social distancing to avoid the spread of coronavirus in your community.

What you need to know about the coronavirus. Learn why the coronavirus shouldn’t be dismissed as your average flu. Plus easy, everyday tips on reducing your chances of becoming infected with COVID-16. I’m also sharing my favorite, hydrating Bastille soap recipe. It’s perfect for dry hand relief from overuse of cheap liquid hand soap and alcohol based hand sanitizers. Plus it’s the perfect project to make while practicing social distancing to avoid the spread of coronavirus in your community.

Why Do We Need to Be Concerned About the Coronavirus?

The coronavirus has everyone up in arms. Whether you’re taking a no nonsense approach to the whole situation, are totally freaked out, or you simply think everyone is overreacting, it’s THE news right now. What I find the most troubling about COVID-19 is what we don’t know. As of yet, we have no clue if the virus will disappear once we have regular warm weather. It doesn’t act like a typical flu virus. It’s also highly contagious.

The current statistics put 3.65% people dying from the coronavirus worldwide. (In Wuhan, that number was 4.9% of the infected population. Source. With the death rate in Italy as of 3/13/20 at 6.7%.) Which, during a bad flu season, isn’t unheard of. However, approximately one in five people who develop this illness have to be hospitalized. 10% of which will require ICU treatment, per the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

To make matters worse, whereas the typical flu infects only 2 to 11% of the population each year, The Atlantic states that COVID-19 has the potential to infect 40-70% of people around the world. (This is now the generally accepted position among epidemiologists as well.) And that’s where it really starts to put this virus into a very sobering perspective. At that rate, it would have the ability to kills millions in the US alone.

So if this thing spreads like wildfire, like it has in China and Italy, it can seriously hamper, and even overwhelm, our health infrastructure. (Canada is already reporting that their hospitals would be unable to cope with a coronavirus outbreak.)

And it’s not just a concern for those with weakened immune systems, cancer or anyone over the age of 60. This virus is especially dangerous to anyone with diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, anyone who smokes or vapes and those with heart, lung or kidney disease. Many of my friends and family fall into one of these categories. And while I’d like to believe I’m invincible to anything life throws my way, I know that I’m not. I’m especially concerned for friends who recently had cancer (and have weakened immune systems,) my brother who has lupus and my dad who has both high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. But beyond that, I care about the rest of the people in the world as well. Which is why I felt it was so important to address this topic on my blog.

I know I’ve made jokes, both publicly and personally, in regards to this being the beginning of the apocalypse and the start of the toilet paper wars. But what remains is that we all need to be diligent and treat this as a real and possible threat. Maybe not to the point we’re rioting outside of Walmart in Cleveland because baby formula is sold out and there’s nothing to cut crack with. But with reasonable measures in which we take not only our safety into account, but also the consideration and safety of others — most especially those at risk.

So if you’re over there hoarding toilet paper, ibuprofen, face masks and hand sanitizer, maybe check in with neighbors and donate some to those in need. I promise you don’t need a year’s supply of provisions to survive this thing. And we need the rest of the population to be able to protect themselves from the coronavirus as well. (If you have doubts, here’s a first hand account of someone who has actually had COVID-19.)

Common Sense Ways to Protect Yourself from the Flu. Learn why you need to be concerned about the flu. Plus easy, everyday tips on reducing your chances of becoming infected with flu. I’m also sharing my favorite, hydrating Bastille soap recipe. It’s perfect for dry hand relief from overuse of cheap liquid hand soap and alcohol based hand sanitizers. Plus it’s the perfect project to make while practicing social distancing to avoid the spread of flu in your community.

Common Sense Ways to Protect Yourself from the Coronavirus

Taking all this into account, here are some common sense ways to protect yourself from the coronavirus, or COVID-19.

  • Practice social distancing. That means avoiding close contact with anyone who is sick, as well as distancing yourself from people if the coronavirus is spreading in your community.
  • Avoid crowds or crowded areas and events.
  • Wash your hands often, for at least 20 seconds, using soap and water. This is especially important if you have been in a public space.
  • If soap and water are unavailable, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. (You may want to carry some with you at all times.) To use, rub hands together until they feel dry. (If hand sanitizer is sold out, here’s how to make DIY hand sanitizer that meets CDC minimum guidelines.)
  • Avoid touching your face (eyes, nose, mouth) with unwashed hands.
  • In public, stay 6 feet (or a coughing distance) from others. 
  • Avoid shaking hands.
  • Disinfect your travel mug after every outing. 
  • Keep disinfectant by every entrance to your home.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces every day. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets and sinks. Household disinfectants should be at least 70% alcohol or an EPA-registered household disinfectant. Alternately, you can also use a bleach solution comprised of 4 teaspoons of bleach combined with 1 quart of water. (Or 1/3rd cup bleach per gallon of water.)
  • Avoid anyone with a cough and stay away from poorly ventilated areas.
  • If you need to cough, do so into your elbow or into a tissue, which is preferable, as it can be disposed of afterwards.
  • If possible, work remotely from home rather than going into the office. Most people get sick at work.
  • As there is a global shortage in face masks, donate yours to communities in need such as senior care facilities and caregivers to help slow the spread of transmission. You only need to wear a face mask if you’re sick, or caring for someone who is sick.
  • Donate excess supplies of hand sanitizer to those in your community who have none.
  • Make preparations in the chance that you do get sick and are quarantined. You will need two weeks worth of provisions, including food. (Not ten years of toilet paper.)
  • Don’t share anything with other people that comes in contact with your mouth or nose.
  • Ensure proper ventilation by keeping air circulation either by opening a window or using a fan. 
  • Use a humidifier. Higher humidity will keep the protective membranes in your nose from drying out, which makes them less effective as they try to keep pathogens out. Mid-range humidity also appears to cause some viruses to decay faster.

Tips to Prevent Flu Infection. Plus Proper Hand Washing with Soap and Water. Washing your hands is still the best way to protect yourself from the flu. Get tips for washing your hands correctly with soap and water. Plus how to make a hydrating Bastille soap recipe that won't dry out your hands like liquid hand soap or alcohol based hand sanitizers.

Hand Washing with Soap and Water

Washing your hands is still the best way to protect yourself from the coronavirus. (I mean, we can’t all hide under a rock forever.) Unfortunately, most cheap, liquid hand soaps aren’t real soap. Much like alcohol based hand sanitizers, they can also dry out your hands when used frequently. This leaves hands feeling tight, dry and itchy. Sometimes they even crack. In turn, this leads to an endless cycle of hand washing followed with moisturizers.

But what if there was a soap that didn’t dry your hands out? An alternative that left your hands clean and also offered some level of dry skin relief?

There are actually a number of these alternatives. Many handmade, cold process soaps meet this criteria. And believe it or not, bar soap is no less sanitary than using liquid hand soap. It does the same job, without the drying side effects, provided the formula isn’t overly cleansing. 

Soap can’t moisturize skin. It is, after all, a wash off product. However, it can hydrate skin. And by choosing a soap with a high level of conditioning and a lower cleansing level, you can actually avoid dry skin all together. Don’t let the lower cleansing level scare you, however. All that means is that it strips fewer oils from your skin. Soap, the combination of a fat and an alkali, is still soap. What hand washing with soap does is mechanically remove germs and pulls unwanted material off skin. Bar soaps does that.

In fact, good old soap and water is more effective than alcohol-based hand sanitizers, especially if hands are visibly dirty. This is because the proteins and fats found in things, such as food tend, to reduce alcohol’s germ-killing power. It’s also favorable over antibacterial liquid hand soap containing triclosan, which contributes to antibiotic resistance. Studies have shown that both antibacterial soap versus good, old fashioned soap and water perform the same against bacteria. However, when tackling cold and flu viruses, antibacterial soap has no benefits over soap and water. This is because viruses aren’t affect by triclosan.

Tips for Washing Hands

When washing hands, there is a right way and a wrong way. Here are some tips to get the most out of washing your hands with soap and water.

  • Avoid scrubbing your skin when washing hands. This can easily damage skin and cause cracks and small cuts that give pathogens a place to grow.
  • As bacteria likes to live under fingernails, it’s wise to keep your nails short so the area underneath is easier to clean.
  • Use a hand lotion or other moisturizer after washing your hands. This helps to keep your skin barrier intact. 
  • Take your time when washing your hands. It takes about a minute to properly wash your hands. (Most of us take about 5 seconds.) However, washing your hands for a full 30 seconds can drop the bacteria count by 99.9%.

Bastille Soap Recipe. How to make cold process Bastille soap. This hydrating Bastille soap recipe won't strip your skin and dry out your hands through repeated hand washings like liquid soap does. Learn the benefits of homemade Bastille soap, how it's made and how you can use DIY Bastille soap when hand washing with soap and water to help prevent flu transmission and infection. Plus tips for washing hands the right way to remove germs.

How to Make Bastille Soap

If you’re in the midst of social distancing, now is a great time to learn how to make soap! And with a number of wonderful soap making suppliers online, you don’t even need to leave your home for supplies. A basic Bastille soap recipe is an easy way to get started. Not only is this hydrating Bastille soap recipe great for repetitive hand washing throughout the day, if you or your family have sensitive skin, it can also help to alleviate some of your other skin care issues.

(This portion of this post originally appeared as a guest post, written by myself, on Everything Pretty.)

What is Bastille Soap?

Formulated with a high percentage olive oil in combination with additional soapmaking oils, Bastille soap is a modern twist on traditional Castile soap which is made using only olive oil. While a traditional Castile soap recipe contains 100% olive oil, modern Castile soap has a looser definition in which Castile soap is defined as any hard soap made from olive oil in addition to other fats and oils. However, purists reject any soap not made with 100% olive oil as Castile soap and instead term soaps made primarily, but not wholly, with olive oil as Bastille soap.

Like Castile soap, Bastille soap still entertains a high percentage of olive oil. Any cold process soap made with at least 70% olive oil is considered a Bastille soap. However, because Castile soap has low lather and requires an extended cure time, Bastille soap makes a wonderful substitute that results both in a better lather as well as a harder bar.

Additionally, as olive oil historically creates a gentle soap that is well suited for sensitive or delicate skin, Bastille soap tends to be gentler on skin than other types of soap. This includes many commercial soaps and beauty bars made with detergent foaming agents and poor quality ingredients. With bastille soap there is also less of a chance that you might develop an allergic reaction to the ingredients used as typically the ingredients for homemade soaps are chosen for their purity and benefits in skin care.

My hydrating Bastille soap recipe that I’m sharing with you today is comprised of 80% olive oil. I also have included coconut and castor oil for better lather and cocoa butter to make a harder soap bar, thus shortening the cure time considerably over Castile soap.

Bastille soap recipe for dry skin or sensitive skin. Get dry skin relief for your dry or sensitive skin by using a handcrafted, cold process Bastille soap bar. Learn how to craft this natural soap recipe is made with 80% olive oil for a hydrating, skin conditioning soap that won't strip skin of its beneficial oils that lead to dryness and itching. A modern twist on traditional Castile soap, this moisturizing Bastille soap recipe is the perfect option for your family's natural skin care routine.

Tips for Making a Bastille Soap Recipe

While making homemade soap from scratch using fats (soapmaking oils and butters) and an alkali (lye or sodium hydroxide) involves a bit more know how than crafting your own melt and pour soaps, getting started with a basic recipe isn’t as difficult as one might presume. In fact, this basic bastille soap recipe can made in about hour and is a lot like baking a cake in many ways, though with weights rather than liquid measurements.

There are however, certain safety precautions you should take to avoid harm when working with a caustic material such as lye. These include wearing gloves, safety glasses and a safety mask that covers your mouth and nose. Nature’s Garden actually has a wonderful article on soap making safety where you can learn more about how to best protect yourself when working with lye.

If you’ve never made cold process soap before, I have an in-depth, cold process soapmaking tutorial here that instructs you on how to get started making homemade soaps from scratch. In addition, you can also find a plethora of soap making videos on YouTube, something that wasn’t available when I first started making soap many many years ago. So hopefully you’ll feel comfortable diving right in once you have a grasp of how it all works.

I know this information can seem like a lot at first for someone new to soapmaking, however, I promise you that once you start you won’t want to stop. Not only are cold process soaps a blessing for troubled skin, but they also make beautiful and functional homemade gift ideas for friends and family.

My hydrating Bastille soap recipe yields approximately six 3.5 oz. soap bars.

Hydrating Bastille soap recipe for dry skin or sensitive skin. Get dry skin relief for your dry or sensitive skin by using a handcrafted, cold process Bastille soap bar. This natural soap recipe is made with 80% olive oil for a hydrating, skin conditioning soap that won't strip skin of its beneficial oils that lead to dryness and itching. A modern twist on traditional Castile soap, this moisturizing Bastille soap recipe is the perfect option for your family's natural skin care routine.

Hydrating Bastille Soap Recipe

Ingredients:

1.6 oz. refined coconut oil (10%)
.8 oz. castor oil (5%)
12.8 oz. pomace olive oil (80%)
.8 oz. cocoa butter (5%)

4.85 fluid oz. distilled water (30.5% of oil weight)
2.05 oz. sodium hydroxide (8 % super fat)

1 Tablespoon sodium lactate (60% solution), optional
.5 oz. essential oil (or essential oil blend) of choice

Instructions:

To make this hydrating Bastille soap recipe, you’ll begin by measuring out the water into a non-aluminum, heat safe container. Next, using a digital scale, weigh out the lye.

In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the distilled water, then stir until all of the lye has dissolved. Now set the lye-water aside to cool.

Meanwhile, while the lye-water cools, weigh out and combine the soap making oils (coconut oil, castor oil, olive oil and cocoa butter) in a non-aluminum pot. Then heat on the stove over medium-low heat until all the oils have melted.

Remove the soap making oils from heat once the oils have melted and allow to cool.

Once both your soap making oils and lye-water have reached about 90° – 95°F you’re ready to make your hydrating Bastille soap recipe!

If desired you can add one Tablespoon of sodium lactate (60% solution) to your lye-water prior to making soap for a harder bar and to give your soap an additional boost in lather.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the liquified soap making oils then blend with a stick or immersion blender until you reach a light trace.

Weigh out the essential oil you’ve chosen to use, if a fragrance is desired, then add to the soap batter.

Continue mixing with a stick blender until you reach a medium trace, then pour the Bastille soap batter into a six-cavity rectangle silicone soap mold.

If desired, you can add flowers or decorative, cosmetic salt to the tops of your freshly poured soap. I added blue cornflowers to the tops of my hydrating Bastille soap bars.

Cover the soap lightly with plastic wrap then set aside in a safe location for 24-48 hours.

Once your Bastille soap bars are no longer soft, remove them from the mold and allow the bars to cure in a cool, dry location for four to six weeks.

If you need to resize my hydrating Bastille soap recipe to fit another soap mold, or to make a larger batch, you will need to run the recipe back through a lye calculator prior to doing so. You can find more information on how to use a lye calculator as well as additional information on how to create custom soap recipes here.

Not ready to make my hydrating Bastille soap recipe? You can purchase a number of lovely, handcrafted Bastille soap bars from artisans on Etsy here.

Bastille soap recipe for dry skin or sensitive skin. Get dry skin relief for your dry or sensitive skin by using a handcrafted, cold process Bastille soap bar. Learn how to craft this natural soap recipe is made with 80% olive oil for a hydrating, skin conditioning soap that won't strip skin of its beneficial oils that lead to dryness and itching. A modern twist on traditional Castile soap, this moisturizing Bastille soap recipe is the perfect option for your family's natural skin care routine.

Love my hydrating Bastille soap recipe? Then be sure to pin this recipe to Pinterest for later. Or explore more of my cold process soap recipes here. You can also find and follow me on facebooktwitterinstagram and Blog Lovin‘. Or sign up to receive an email whenever I share a new post!

DIY Hand Sanitizer with Alcohol: An Alternative When Hand Washing Isn’t An Option

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I may receive compensation from links on this site. As an Amazon Associate I also earn from qualifying purchases. See my disclosure policy.

This flu season is especially scary. As the Coronapocalypse continues to claim lives and spread throughout the world, it’s more important than ever to take protective measures against this new strain of the flu. The top two ways to do this include handwashing and the use of hand sanitizers when soap and water aren’t available. With hand sanitizer unavailable in many locations due to the outbreak, you can make an effective DIY hand sanitizer at home. Keep reading to learn how to make a simple, 2-ingredient homemade hand sanitizer recipe for use when tested, commercial hand sanitizers are unavailable. 

DIY hand sanitizer gel recipe with alcohol. Learn how to make an effective, 2-ingredient DIY hand sanitizer that contains the minimum recommended 60% alcohol for use as a protective measure against the flu virus. Two ways to make a homemade hand sanitizer recipe using either isopropyl alcohol or 150 proof vodka for natural health and wellness. A holistic approach to fighting cold and flu germs when hand washing isn't an option. Easy natural alternative to commercial hand sanitizers.

With the new virus now a pandemic, people are literally freaking out. Everywhere. And there are three sides to this entire event. At least for those of us living in the United States. They are:

  • The people who believe the reports of the coronavirus are nothing more than fear mongering.
  • Those who have a healthy outlook that most people will be okay, but precautions need to be taken especially if you are in a risk group.
  • And finally, the individuals who believe this is the start of the apocalypse.

There have been a lot of crazy photos and reports on social media. I’ve seen tons of pictures where big box stores and wholesale clubs who are entirely sold out of hand sanitizer, cleaning products and toilet paper. Not that the flu and toilet paper have anything in common necessarily. But there are folks who are literally preparing for the end of days. And while I can see TP being a priority in day to day life, I just never imagined folks would value it like gold when the zombie virus finally takes hold. (Although I’m definitely filing this information for later.)

On the flip side of this, I’ve also seen memes indicating that women ages 30-50 are most likely to carry the virus without symptoms. And therefore, they should quarantine themselves away from men and children, for a period of fourteen days, at their local wineries. With all cell phones confiscated upon arrival. (I mean, why not? We women totally deserve a break from home life.)

In the end, while the Coronapocalypse is indeed a pandemic, it’s not the world’s — or even our nation’s — top killer. That would be cardiovascular disease. And yet, no one is out there panicking about cutting their meat consumption and increasing their intake of fresh fruits and vegetables. No, the coronavirus is apparently a hell of a lot scarier. Perhaps because of its immediacy, and its ability to infect even the healthiest of hosts.

Homemade hand sanitizer recipe with vodka. Learn how to make an effective, 2-ingredient DIY hand sanitizer that contains the minimum recommended 60% alcohol for use as a protective measure against the flu virus. Two ways to make a homemade hand sanitizer recipe using either isopropyl alcohol or 150 proof vodka for natural health and wellness. A holistic approach to fighting cold and flu germs when hand washing isn't an option. Easy natural alternative to commercial hand sanitizers.

Of course, the two week quarantine protocol they’re enacting basically everywhere does cause concern. (But as such, two weeks still does not require 96 rolls of toilet paper!) As does the large percentage of deaths that first began in China. And if you’re at risk, either due to age or health issues, then you definitely want to take precautions to avoid becoming one of the 2% of the infected population dying from this new virus. (The flu, on average, kills .2% of those infected during an average flu season in comparison.)

While hand sanitizer is flying off the shelves, and is no longer available in many locations, it’s not the end all be all to flu prevention. It still remains, and the CDC holds to this, that hand washing is the #1 preventive measure you can take against this new virus. (Learn more here.) Still, if hand washing isn’t an option — and when it is you need to do so for at least 20 seconds — then hand sanitizer can offer some level of germ destroying power until you can get your hands on some soap and water. Therefore you may want to keep it in your bag as backup when you’re traveling or attending a public event. Or, simply avoid traveling and events until this whole thing boils over. (Really, why the hell is anyone flying into Colorado for a ski trip while harboring a deadly virus anyway? Am I right?)

It is also important to note, however, that if your hands are visibly dirty, hand washing is necessary. (That hand sanitizer isn’t going to do squat.) In which case, tossing a bar of soap and few bottles of water into your bag, in lieu of hand sanitizer, is probably an even better idea. But, I get it. Staying home isn’t a realistic option for most of us. Jamming your mom bag full of even more crap? Well, we expect that anyway.

(Read the recommendations for utilizing handwashing and hand sanitizers as protective measures against the virus from the World Health Organization.)

DIY hand sanitizer gel recipe with alcohol. Learn how to make an effective, 2-ingredient DIY hand sanitizer that contains the minimum recommended 60% alcohol for use as a protective measure against the flu virus. Two ways to make a homemade hand sanitizer recipe using either isopropyl alcohol or 150 proof vodka for natural health and wellness. A holistic approach to fighting cold and flu germs when hand washing isn't an option. Easy natural alternative to commercial hand sanitizers.

How to Make Homemade Hand Sanitizer

If you can’t find hand sanitizer right now, or there’s some serious price gouging happening that you refuse to tolerate, then you can make your own DIY hand sanitizer. It is important to note, however, that unless your DIY hand sanitizer is at least 60% alcohol, then it’s not going to be effective. You can make your own DIY hand sanitizer using two types of alcohol. One is isopropyl alcohol, which is also known as rubbing alcohol. The other is ethyl alcohol, also known as ethanol. Ethyl alcohol is the type of alcohol used to make the alcohol we drink, such as  grain alcohol, vodka or everclear. Both isopropyl alcohol and ethyl alcohol come with varying levels of alcohol content. As well, they both have drawbacks.

Isopropyl Alcohol vs. Ethyl Alcohol for Making DIY Hand Sanitizer

Isopropyl alcohol is great for disinfecting surfaces. 70% isopropyl alcohol is recommended when sanitizing surfaces. (Source.) So while you may have the 91%+ in your arsenal for melt and pour soap making — hello, fellow soapers! — opt for the lower percentage when disinfecting and sanitizing surfaces. If you already have it on hand, you can use 70% isopropyl alcohol to make a DIY hand sanitizer as well, but with some caution.

It is extremely important to note that isopropyl alcohol is poisonous when consumed. This is especially the case where children are concerned, as isopropyl alcohol can poison children in even small amounts. As such, it’s not recommended that you use a DIY hand sanitizer with isopropyl alcohol on small children who may lick their hands after the application. (You can learn the symptoms of isopropyl alcohol poisoning here.)

Likewise, ethyl alcohol can also poison children through ingestion. (And, unless, it’s been denatured, is illegal in a number of states.) Small children could potentially become drunk or even develop alcohol poisoning through the ingestion of a DIY hand sanitizer made with ethyl alcohol. (I once came across an ex-physician who would drink a gallon of the old school, ethyl alcohol hand sanitizers when working at the hospital to feed his alcoholism.) Therefore, as the coronavirus seems to spare children from death, unlike adults, you may want be diligent about having young children wash their hands, rather than using a hand sanitizer.

It is also important to note, that any DIY hand sanitizer with a high level of alcohol, can be especially drying to skin. As dry skin is prone to cracking, which allows germs to more readily enter the body, you may want to stock up on moisturizers, and not just hand sanitizer, to prevent dryness.

As safety is a concern where children may have access to hand sanitizers, I chose to use vodka with 75% alcohol content, rather than 70% isopropyl alcohol to make my DIY hand sanitizer. However, you may use either one or the other according to your preference, in my homemade hand sanitizer recipe, found below.

Using Alcohol or Vodka to Make Homemade Hand Sanitizer

Despite Virginia being well known for its moonshine, 190 proof Everclear, which is 95% alcohol, is illegal where I live. Therefore, my homemade hand sanitizer recipe uses 150 proof vodka which contains 75% alcohol. Fortunately, you can readily purchase 150 proof alcohol, providing you’re at least 21 years of age, even if you’re in one of those states where 190 proof alcohol is illegal. This means, however, that you do need to use a larger percentage of vodka in your DIY hand sanitizer in order for it to be effective.

Vodka with a high alcohol content is also important if you’d like to add essential oils to your DIY hand sanitizer. As essential oils don’t mix well with water, low proof alcohol, witch hazel or vinegar, you risk causing irritation, sensitivity and even an allergic reaction if including them in your DIY hand sanitizer. Therefore it’s important to both properly dilute and ensure a solid emulsion when formulating a homemade hand sanitizer, or other skin care formulation, using essential oils. However, there is no evidence that adding essential oils improves the effectiveness of hand sanitizer. 

DIY hand sanitizer gel recipe with alcohol. Learn how to make an effective, 2-ingredient DIY hand sanitizer that contains the minimum recommended 60% alcohol for use as a protective measure against the flu virus. Two ways to make a homemade hand sanitizer recipe using either isopropyl alcohol or 150 proof vodka for natural health and wellness. A holistic approach to fighting cold and flu germs when hand washing isn't an option. Easy natural alternative to commercial hand sanitizers.

DIY Hand Sanitizer with Vodka or Grain Alcohol

You honestly only need two ingredients to make a DIY hand sanitizer. Aloe vera gel and 150 proof vodka or grain alcohol. A formulation calling for two parts 70% alcohol to one part aloe gel was recommended by my local news station, in order to meet the guidelines set for an effective hand sanitizer in that it contains at least 60% alcohol. However, as they didn’t use weights it all gets very confusing. Therefore, I now recommend using a 3 to 1 ratio unless you’re really good at math, and are able to verify the weight of your ingredients, in order to err on the side of caution. (See the addendum below.) If desired, you can also add an essential oil blend as you see fit. You can also substitute the grain alcohol or vodka, if desired with 70% isopropyl alcohol.

Ingredients:

2 oz. aloe vera gel 
6 oz. 150 proof vodka or grain alcohol 

Directions:

Measure out both the aloe vera gel and vodka in fluid ounce. (If you don’t have high proof vodka in your area, you can use Everclear 151.) Combine in a glass bowl.

Then mix the ingredients well, until thoroughly combined. There should be no lumps once the hand sanitizer is evenly mixed throughout.

Once you have a smooth hand gel, spoon your sanitizer into a 6 oz. container (or several smaller containers) of your choice. (I used these containers from SKS Bottle & Packaging.)

Be sure to wash your hands frequently. When soap and water are not available, rub your alcohol based hand sanitizer on hands until dry to help protect against viruses, when a tested, commercial product is unavailable.

DIY hand sanitizer with alcohol and immune boosting essential oils. Make an effective, 2-ingredient DIY hand sanitizer that contains 60% alcohol for use as a protective measure against the flu virus with two essential oil blends for immune support. Two ways to make a homemade hand sanitizer recipe using either isopropyl alcohol or 150 proof vodka for natural health and wellness when hand washing isn't an option to fight cold and flu viruses when other alternatives aren't available.

Adding Essential Oils to Hand Sanitizer

Essential oils aren’t necessary for an effective DIY hand sanitizer. The key is, as previously stated, ensuring the alcohol content of your homemade hand sanitizer is 60% or more. There is no indication that essentials oil can or will protect you from the coronavirus, or other cold and flu viruses. If you do decide, however, that you’d like to include essential oils in your formulation, you can add one of the following essential oils blends to my homemade hand sanitizer recipe when blending the alcohol with the aloe gel. You should also increase the alcohol in your DIY hand sanitizer by triple the amount of essential oils added.

Immunity Boost Essential Oil Blend:

Thieves Essential Oil Blend:

It’s important to note that both clove and cinnamon essential oils are known skin irritants. Therefore, this blend is used in a lower concentration, and should be used with caution.

Addendum: The correct way to figure the amount of alcohol needed for a DIY hand sanitizer is to use weight measurements. I used volume to simplify this recipe for those without access to a digital scale. Aloe gel by weight is not 2 oz. It’s 1.75 oz. While vodka seems to weigh less than water, around 1.5 oz. per 2 fluid oz.

I have a screenshot of a chart here that explains the math for figuring out the amounts you need to end up with the desired amount of alcohol in your final product. If you are using a product with 99% alcohol say, you can decrease the recipe to 2 parts alcohol to 1 part aloe gel.

For further reading on how alcohol based hand sanitizers are formulated, you can learn more here

Or check out my natural remedy for cold and flu relief for making fire cider vinegar. You can also learn how to make soap. Or buy some! It’s not sold out yet. 

If you like my post on how to make a DIY hand sanitizer with vodka, then follow Soap Deli News more health and wellness projects! You can find and follow me on facebooktwitterinstagram and Blog Lovin‘. Or sign up to receive an email whenever I share a new post!

Fire Cider Vinegar Recipe: A Natural Cold and Flu Remedy

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I may receive compensation from links on this site. As an Amazon Associate I also earn from qualifying purchases. See my disclosure policy.

I tried fire cider vinegar as a natural cold and flu remedy for the first time at the end of last year. This was after getting yet another cold. A cold which I honestly think was being passed back and forth between me and and a guy I’d been dating. The results were quickly noticeable. By day three I felt like a whole new, shiny person. And that undying sinus headache, that typically only Sudafed takes care of, was quick to make a hasty retreat from the first use. Not only did it help immediately, I didn’t have to take any over the counter medication in addition to the fire cider I was taking.

Fire cider vinegar recipe: A natural cold and flu home remedy for symptom relief. Learn how to make a homemade fire cider vinegar as a natural cold and flu remedy. This traditional, warming apple cider vinegar tonic acts as a holistic decongestant while also supporting immune health. Boost your immunity for health and wellness with this holistic homeopathic fire cider recipe.

I’ve since recommended fire cider vinegar for natural cold and flu relief to all of my friends. Those who took my advice felt better within two days time, with complete relief in under a week. Those who didn’t, well. Let’s just say their illnesses dragged on for two full weeks. Unfortunately, buying fire cider can be expensive. Therefore, if you aren’t in a time crunch, I recommend making your own to keep in stock for when you need it as a home remedy for colds and flu.

With the new virus now a pandemic, a combo of both fire cider vinegar and elderberry syrup are my go to products for cold and flu season. Keep reading to learn more about the benefits of fire cider as a cold and flu remedy, how to make your own fire cider vinegar recipe using raw apple cider vinegar, and other natural cold and flu remedies you can try.

ingredients for making fire cider at home from scratch

Fire Cider Cold and Flu Remedy

I’ve been an advocate for apple cider vinegar for a number of years now. It all started with a quest to learn how to better manage my fibromyalgia after realizing that pain killers were literally the worst ever way to treat a chronic condition. I tried literally a zillion supplements and remedies during my hunt for a natural alternative. This journey led me to kombucha tea. Then, eventually, to an apple cider vinegar tonic to remedy my gut health.

When I first learned about fire cider vinegar it was during a trademark dispute over the use of “fire cider.” A traditional cold and flu remedy, the term fire cider had been used for centuries as a holistic remedy. That a company had come along and trademarked a well known term used for a natural remedy was concerning to a lot of people. Luckily, some upstanding, prominent herbalists took it upon themselves to fight this trademark. And, after a lot of time and money (much of which was donated to the cause), they finally won. Five years later and Shire City Herbals no longer owns a trademark to the common term, fire cider.

horseradish for making traditional fire cider vinegar recipe as a natural home remedy for cold and flu relief

This also sets a precedent that prevents the names for traditional folk remedies from being trademarked in the future. Therefore it’s seen as a win for herbalists. After all, people had been making, using and selling fire cider vinegar long before Shire City Herbals trademarked the name in 2012.

Not only should the name not have been trademarked in the first place, but the claim that Shire City Herbals came up with fire cider vinegar on its own in 2010 was simply untrue. There are decades upon decades of history outlining its use. Rosemary Gladstar, a well known and respected herbalist, also outlined a fire cider tonic recipe in her book, Herbs for the Home Medicine Chest, which was first published in 1999 as a traditional, herbal cold and flu remedy.

raw honey and garlic for making a natural cold and flu home remedy for fire cider

What Is Fire Cider?

Fire cider vinegar is a traditional, warming apple cider vinegar tonic. It acts as a holistic decongestant while also supporting immune health. Comprised of onions, garlic, peppers, ginger, horseradish, a lemon or orange, turmeric, raw honey and apple cider vinegar, this spicy folk preparation is perfect as a shooter or an addition to water, oil and vinegar dressings and foods like fried rice or mixed veggies. There are a number of different ways to make fire cider vinegar, although the basics tend to remain the same due to their effectiveness.

It’s easy to customize and, of course, you can add as much honey as you like to taste. It also makes a great addition to non-alcoholic, bloody mary recipe. Unfortunately, it does take a month to steep in a cool, dark location. So if you need your fire cider fix ASAP, you can buy this traditional herbal cold remedy online. Or pick some up at your local co-op like I did!

Keep reading to learn how to make a homemade fire cider vinegar as a natural cold and flu remedy for you and your family.

Fire cider vinegar recipe: A natural cold and flu home remedy for symptom relief. Learn how to make a homemade fire cider vinegar as a natural cold and flu remedy. This traditional, warming apple cider vinegar tonic acts as a holistic decongestant while also supporting immune health. Boost your immunity for health and wellness with this holistic homeopathic fire cider recipe.

Traditional Fire Cider Vinegar Recipe

Ingredients:

1 medium organic onion, chopped
10 cloves of organic garlic, crushed or chopped
2 organic jalapeno peppers, chopped
Zest and juice from 1 organic lemon
1/2 cup fresh grated organic ginger root
1/2 cup fresh grated organic horseradish root
1 Tbsp. organic turmeric powder
1/4 tsp. organic cayenne powder
2 Tbsp. of dried rosemary leaves
organic apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup of raw local honey, or to taste

Instructions:

Prepare the ingredients as indicated, by chopping the onion, garlic and peppers. Then grate the ginger and horseradish. Zest and juice the lemon, then combine with the prepared vegetables and spices in a one quart, sterilized mason jar.

Fill the remainder of the mason jar with unfiltered apple cider vinegar. (I love Bragg’s apple cider vinegar with the “mother.”) Then, place a piece of wax paper, or parchment paper, on top of the jar and screw on the lid. (Alternately, you can also use a mason jar with a plastic lid. You just don’t want the acid from the apple cider vinegar eating away at the metal.)

Shake the jar to combine the ingredients. Then, store the mason jar with the fire cider vinegar in a cool, dark location. You should shake the jar once a day for a period of four to six weeks.

After this time, strain the fire cider vinegar through a fine mesh sieve strainer or cheesecloth. Be sure to squeeze the liquid from the pulp of your fire cider vinegar ingredients as well. You want all the natural health benefits that are found in these particular foods!

Now add the raw honey to the fire cider vinegar. You can adjust the amount to taste. Fire cider vinegar is spicy, but not so spicy I couldn’t stand it. (And yes, I’m a wimp. I buy MILD salsa like a crazy person.)

Your fire cider vinegar is now ready to be used. When not in use, simply store your fire cider vinegar in a cool, dark location or in your refrigerator.

Fire cider vinegar recipe: A natural cold and flu home remedy for symptom relief. Learn how to make a homemade fire cider vinegar as a natural cold and flu remedy. This traditional, warming apple cider vinegar tonic acts as a holistic decongestant while also supporting immune health. Boost your immunity for health and wellness with this holistic homeopathic fire cider recipe.

How to Use Fire Cider as a Cold and Flu Remedy

To use your fire cider vinegar, take one to two Tablespoons as needed to naturally relieve cold and flu symptoms. I like to do shots about three times a day when I first start getting sick. (I also chug a glass of water directly afterwards to tame the burn.) However, you can adjust your intake based on what your body needs at the time.

If you drink a LOT of apple cider vinegar, it does have the potential to damage tooth enamel. So you may want to dilute yours in a glass of water instead.

Fire cider vinegar recipe: A natural cold and flu home remedy for symptom relief. Learn how to make a homemade fire cider vinegar as a natural cold and flu remedy. This traditional, warming apple cider vinegar tonic acts as a holistic decongestant while also supporting immune health. Boost your immunity for health and wellness with this holistic homeopathic fire cider recipe.

If you like my fire cider vinegar recipe, then be sure to pin it for later.

Alternative Natural Cold and Flu Remedies

If you’re looking for more ways to support immune health throughout cold and flu season, you can also try one of these other natural alternatives.

If you like my natural fire cider vinegar recipe, be sure to follow Soap Deli News on facebooktwitter and instagram as well as on Blog Lovin‘. Or sign up to receive an email whenever I share a new post!

This article is not intended to provide diagnosis, treatment or medical advice and is provided for informational purposes only. Information on products mentioned are based on my own personal experience or research and have not been evaluated by the FDA. Please consult a physician prior to making any changes that may impact your health.

Sleep Rollerball Recipe: A Simple Essential Oil Blend To Promote Restful Sleep

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I may receive compensation from links on this site. As an Amazon Associate I also earn from qualifying purchases. See my disclosure policy.

Learn how to make an easy, 2-ingredient sleep rollerball recipe with a simple essential oil blend for sleep. A natural way to promote restful sleep, this essential oil blend is kid-safe and can be used even if you are pregnant or nursing. Plus discover tips on how to get a good night’s sleep by simply changing a few of your daily habits.

Sleep Rollerball Recipe: Essential Oil Blend for Sleep. An easy 2-ingredient DIY sleep rollerball recipe with a simple essential oil blend for sleep. A natural way to promote restful sleep, this kid safe essential oil blend for insomnia can be used if pregnant or nursing. Plus tips on how to get a good night's sleep by simply changing a few of your daily habits. Kick your insomnia for good with this natural sleep remedy that uses aromatherapy to promote sleep.

Using Essential Oils for Sleep

There are a lot of factors that affect one getting a good night’s sleep. For me, living with fibromyalgia has a huge impact. While I’ve worked hard to find successful ways to manage fibromyalgia symptoms, I still have bad days. Between the barometric change in pressure (rain, rain, go away) and Aunt Flo making a visit that coincides with that, I’ve been struggling hard the past few days. Not only does this mean having to step back a bit from the blog and exercise a bit of self care, it also means that I have to find ways to ensure I’m getting the best sleep I possibly can.

Essential oils for sleep. How make essential oil blends to use in aromatherapy for sleep: 3 ways to make an insomnia sleep spray recipe for pillow mists & body sprays. Help combat sleeplessness and get a good night's rest with an aromatherapeutic essential oil blend recipe. By utilizing aromatherapy for sleep, you can promote a restful night's sleep. Not only can my easy DIY aromatherapy sleep spray assist in helping you fall asleep faster, it may also help you sleep more soundly

Previously I made an aromatherapeutic insomnia sleep spray to help promote sleep. Made with a simple essential oil blend of vetiver, lavender and ylang ylang, this sleep pillow spray works wonders. However, I know not everyone loves the ways these essential oils smell. Some people hate the scent of lavender essential oil, while others find vetiver too earthy and overpowering. That, and vetiver can give you some pretty wacky dreams. (Kind of like melatonin has a tendency to do.) Therefore, I thought I’d also share an easy sleep rollerball recipe as another natural alternative to help with sleep.

My sleep rollerball recipe requires only the purchase of a single, sleep essential oil blend. This makes this project cheaper than buying multiple essential oils up front. Rather than a blend of lavender, vetiver and ylang ylang essential oils that I used previously, this sleep essential oil blend contains lavender, grapefruit, ho wood and bergamot essential oils. It smells heavenly and it’s also child safe for kids ages 2 and up, when properly diluted. Additionally, it’s also safe if you are pregnant or breastfeeding — and a lot of us know how exhausting both of those prospects can be. Plus, by utilizing the aromatherapeutic of essential oils, there are no pills to swallow or drug interactions to worry about. 

This super simple, sleep rollerball recipe is one of the recipes from a past Simply Earth essential oil recipe box. I love how easy Simply Earth makes it to get started using essential oils by including six recipes in each of their monthly boxes, in addition to the essential oils and other materials you need to create them. If you think you might be interested in giving their recipe boxes a go, then be sure to use coupon code: SOAPDELIFREE when you sign up here. You’ll score a free bonus box (with rollerball bottles, coconut oil and more) valued at $40, along with a coupon for $40 off your next order. (I used mine to score this awesome essential oil diffuser.)

Otherwise, you can simply purchase Simply Earth’s sleep essential oil blend here without having to sign up for anything at all. Or straight up purchase their pre-made Sleepy Rollerball and you’re good to go with no extra work necessary.

Here’s how to make Simply Earth’s easy, sleep rollerball recipe. (And don’t forget to check out my tips for getting a good night’s sleep after the recipe for more ideas on how to get a restful night’s sleep!)

Sleep Rollerball Recipe: Essential Oil Blend for Sleep. Make an easy 2-ingredient sleep rollerball recipe with a simple essential oil blend for sleep. A natural way to promote restful sleep, this essential oil blend is kid-safe and can be used even if you are pregnant or nursing. Plus discover tips on how to get a good night's sleep by simply changing a few of your daily habits. Kid safe essential oils for sleep. How to use aromatherapy to promote sleep.

Sleep Rollerball Recipe

Ingredients:

9 drops Sleepy essential oil blend
10 mL sweet almond oil

Instructions for making this sleep rollerball recipe:

Add nine drops of the sleep essential oil blend to a 10 mL rollerball bottle.

Then fill the remainder of the bottle with sweet almond oil. Then swirl to mix.

Cap the rollerball bottle before screwing on the lid.

How to Use Your Sleep Essential Oil Blend:

To use your aromatherapeutic sleep essential oil blend you made from this sleep rollerball recipe, simply apply to pulse points as needed to promote a restful sleep.

Don’t want to use this sleep essential oil blend in a rollerball bottle? Learn how to use this sleep essential oil blend to create an aromatherapeutic sleep pillow spray here. Or simply add a few drops of the sleep essential oil blend to your diffuser to promote a restful night’s sleep.

DIY Aromatherapy Roll On For Rest and Relaxation! Learn how to make your own DIY aromatherapy roll on for rest and relaxation! Plus other natural alternatives that teach you how to get a good night's sleep. #sleepaid #health #wellness #aromatherapy #sleep #sleepease #natural #holistic #herbal #essentialoils #naturalremedies #homeremedies

Alternately, you can also try this aromatherapy roll on recipe for rest and relaxation. It’s made with an essential oil blend for sleep that includes lavender, mandarin, bergamot and ylang ylang essential oils.

Looking to learn even more about essential oils and their aromatherapeutic benefits? Be sure to check out Simply Earth’s new Essential Oil Hero Course. This extensive course on essential oils not only provides you with recipes and the knowledge you need to use essential oils safely, it also comes with a fabulous essential oil starter kit. And, there’s even the option to pay for the course over time. Learn more here.

But, before you leave, check out my tips on getting a good night’s sleep below!

Tips for Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

While products such as melatonin, herbal supplements and even aromatherapy — like my sleep rollerball recipe — can help promote a restful night’s sleep, there are also simple activities and changes you can make in your day to day lifestyle to help you get a good night’s sleep. Following are a few simple tips to help you sleep better naturally.

  • Stay active and exercise daily, even if you’re just taking a walk around the block.
  • Ditch electronic devices two hours before bedtime. That means no tv, video games, computers or cell phones.
  • Increase your time outdoors. Two hours of sunshine a day can improve your quality and duration of sleep by up to 80%.
  • Skip caffeinated beverages all together. If this isn’t doable, then avoid drinking any beverages with caffeine after 2pm or at least seven hours prior to your normal bedtime.
  • Don’t drink alcohol. The consumption of alcohol can seriously disrupt your sleep patterns as well as reduce your body’s natural melatonin production. 
  • Avoid eating meals before going to bed. Your last meal of the day should be at least three hours before hitting the hay. Otherwise, it can disrupt hormones and affect sleep quality.
  • Stick to a consistent schedule. Keeping a regular schedule by getting up and going to bed at the same time everyday can help you get consistent, better quality sleep. 
  • Need a nap? If you must take a nap during the day, limit that nap to no more than a half hour.
  • Make sure you’re getting all the vitamins and minerals your body needs by taking a daily multivitamin or supplements. Low levels of things like B6 and magnesium can definitely affect sleep quality as well as your ability to fall asleep.

Do you have tips for getting a good night’s sleep? I’d love to hear about them in the comments!

Sleep Roller Blend Recipe: Best Essential Oil Blend for Sleep plus tips on how to get a good night's sleep. Stop your insomnia with these natural alternatives for sleep. An easy 2-ingredient DIY sleep rollerball recipe with a simple essential oil blend for sleep. A natural way to promote restful sleep, this kid safe essential oil blend for insomnia can be used if pregnant or nursing. Kick your insomnia for good with this natural sleep remedy that uses aromatherapy to promote sleep.

And don’t forget to pin this easy sleep rollerball recipe to Pinterest for later. (You can also find and follow on me on Pinterest here.)

For more ways to use essential oils for home, healthy and beauty, be sure to follow my Essential Oils Pinterest board. Or for more great recipes and projects from Soap Deli News, be sure to follow me on Blog Lovin‘, facebooktwitter and instagram. Or sign up for my newsletter. 

Self Care Journal: How to Make a Self Care Journal (with Free Printables)

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I may receive compensation from links on this site. As an Amazon Associate I also earn from qualifying purchases. See my disclosure policy.

Learn how to make a self care journal to set your healthy resolutions for the New Year with these printable journal pages that are all about self care! This printable self care journal contains not just inspiration blank journal pages for writing down your thoughts and dreams, it also has pages for setting goals, healthy food recipes, skin care recipes and face mask recipes that fit your skin type each season. So you can use this journal throughout the year and start at any time.

Printable self care journal. Learn how to make a self care journal to set your healthy resolutions for the New Year with these free printable self care journal pages that are all about self care! This printable self care journal contains inspirational blank journal pages for writing down your thoughts and dreams, as well as pages for setting goals, healthy food recipes, skin care recipes and face mask recipes that fit your skin type each season.

Additionally, there’s also a self care checklist so you remember to take time out for self care at least once a week. I’ve even included a printable front and back cover that you can print onto cardstock to make a completely handmade self care journal if desired.

Keep reading to discover 60 self care journal prompts and my printable self care journal pages. You’ll also learn how to make a self care journal using my free resources. Plus there’s information I received from licensed therapist, Corinne Phillips, on how to break unhealthy habits and addictions through journaling, along with some great ideas and projects you can implement for self care.

Free printable self care journal. Learn how to make a self care journal to set your healthy resolutions for the New Year with these free printable self care journal pages that are all about self care! This printable self care journal contains inspirational blank journal pages for writing down your thoughts and dreams, as well as pages for setting goals, healthy food recipes, skin care recipes and face mask recipes that fit your skin type each season.

DIY Self Care Journal

It’s a New Year and hopefully that means you’ve set your sights on some healthy resolutions to get you through the year. That means taking care not just of your physical health, but your emotional health as well. And what better way to learn how to put yourself first (so you can be there for others) than with a self care journal?

How to make a self care journal. Learn how to make a self care journal for inner reflection and emotional health with these free printable self care journal pages that are all about self care! This printable self care journal contains inspirational blank journal pages for writing down your thoughts and dreams, as well as pages for setting goals, healthy food recipes, skin care recipes and face mask recipes. Plus 60 self care journal prompts and easy self care ideas and projects. #selfcarejournal

Journal Prompts & Ideas

Not sure what to write in your self care journal. If need some direction to get started, then try one of these self care journal prompts for self care and inner reflection.

  • What makes me happy?
  • What goals do I aspire to?
  • Why do the people in my life make me happy?
  • When am I most confident?
  • What does my ideal day look like?
  • Who is someone in your life who should treat me better?
  • What do I want my legacy to be?
  • Today my self care mantra is…
  • How do I enrich the lives of others?
  • What inspires me?
  • I feel most energized when I do or experience these things.
  • What is causing me stress right now?
  • Is there a new craft or hobby I’d like to explore?
  • What actions or bad habits are holding me back from a happier, richer life?
  • What am I proud of myself for?
  • How can I change my morning routine to make it easier?
  • What is my favorite personality trait?
  • What things make me feel powerful?
  • How can I love myself today?
  • What is my best accomplishment?
  • Who is the person I want to become?
  • What advice would I give my teenage self?
  • The words I like to live by are…
  • What makes me unique?
  • How have I changed from the person I was five years ago?
  • What message do I most want to share with the world?
  • Ten reasons why I love myself.
  • What am I afraid of?
  • If I died tomorrow, how do I think I’d be remembered?
  • Who in my life means the world to me and why?
  • What changes can I make to slay my goals?
  • My life feels like magic when…
  • During difficult times, I’ve found that doing this helps the most.
  • What’s something I can do to make my life a delight every single day?
  • Make a list of twenty things that make me smile.
  • Write a list of things I’m grateful for today.
  • If I could take a vacation anywhere in the world, where would I go and who would go with me?
  • What does forgiveness mean to me?
  • How does journaling help me?
  • What love means to me…
  • On a scale of 1-10 my mental health is at…
  • What do I wish my parents had done differently when raising me?
  • Write a letter to my mom.
  • What is my biggest regret and what have I done to make amends?
  • I wish for….
  • The two most memorable moments of my life are…
  • What does unconditional love look like for me?
  • I practice self care because I want to feel…
  • Where is my happy space?
  • If my body could talk, this is what it would say.
  • What are three things I’m doing that no longer serve my best interests?
  • Make a list of everything I should say “no” to.
  • What do I love most about life?
  • How will making myself a priority positively impact my life?
  • What changes can I make to get a more restful night’s sleep?
  • When I’m really busy, what activities can I do in just ten minutes to practice self care?
  • How can I better balance my work and my personal life?
  • What is my favorite self care quote?
  • What are the things I truly, deeply need in my life?
  • If I had unlimited resources and zero obligations, what would I do with my life?

Don’t feel like you need to write paragraphs for these journal prompts. You can bullets instead. For best results, however, it’s best not to go more than two days without putting something down on paper.

How to make a self care journal. Learn how to make a self care journal for inner reflection and emotional health with these free printable self care journal pages that are all about self care! This printable self care journal contains inspirational blank journal pages for writing down your thoughts and dreams, as well as pages for setting goals, healthy food recipes, skin care recipes and face mask recipes. Plus 60 self care journal prompts and easy self care ideas and projects to make at home.

How to Make a Self Care Journal

Print the Journal Cover

Print the self care journal cover onto 8.5″ x 11″ cardstock. Then cut out the front and back cover. For best results, use a paper cutter to get straight, clean lines. Allow some white space around the black lines of the cover when cutting. (Download here.) I used my Epson Expression printer, which has been a dream to use.

printable skin care recipe and face mask recipe cards

Print the Journal Pages

This journal consists of 12 8.5″ x 11″ pages, each with two journal pages for a total of 24 pages for your self care journal. You can either print all of the pages or simply the pages you want. The pages include two each of the following:

  • Skin care recipe cards
  • Self care checklist pages
  • Healthy recipe cards (here’s one of my fave healthy recipes to try!)
  • Face mask recipe cards
  • Pages for setting healthy goals

printable self care journal pages

There are also fourteen lined journal pages featuring seven different motivational quotes and images.

Simply download the printable self care journal pages then print onto 8.5″ x 11″ paper. Then cut out the pages the same way you did the cover for the journal. (Download here.)

The pages are slightly smaller than the cover so they fit neatly inside. These printable self care journal pages will even fit inside your Happy Planner!

self care journal pages

Assemble Your Journal

To assemble your journal, use a hole punch to punch holes into both the cover of your journal, if using, as well as the free printable self care journal pages. If you you are using a Happy Planner, you can use those pages as a guide both for cutting out your pages as well as lining up the holes properly.

Once you’ve punched holes into your journal pages, you can either add them to an existing journal, such as a Happy planner, or create a self care journal using the printed journal cover.

To use the provided journal cover, simply position the journal pages between the printed front and back cover. Then loose leaf binder rings to hold the cover and pages together.

Alternately, you don’t have to punch holes into your self care journal pages. Instead, you can use binder clips to hold the pages together in book form. Both methods, however, allow you to remove or add pages as desired.

Printable self care weekly planner stickers

Want printable self care planner stickers for your new journal? Here are a few you might like including these printable self care weekly planner stickers (pictured) from Love2Plan92.

Need more guidance on your self care journey? Check out this amazing sacred self care workbook or this therapy journal for mental health struggles.

Journaling to Break Unhealthy Habits & Addictions

If you’ve been reading Soap Deli News for some time, then you’re probably aware that I started seeing a therapist after a rather difficult end to what was an incredibly short second marriage. She has been a dream with helping me overcome emotional distress and work toward healthy emotional goals.

Recently I started seeing her again to help me break unhealthy habits. Three of the most important tips she gave me to help me break unhealthy habits and addictions were to 1.) not shame myself for these habits and 2.) find something positive to replace the habit you want to stop and 3.) focus on the benefits of breaking that unhealthy happy or addiction and the positive things that come from not doing it. These work for any number of unhealthy habits or addictions including alcohol consumption as well as binge eating.

She also gave me an acronym to use with journaling. That acronym is TICES. TICES stands for:

  • Trigger
  • Image
  • Cognition
  • Emotions
  • Sensations

So basically, when you want to do whatever the unhealthy habit is you want to stop, you consider these five things and then write about them. For example, if you are trying to stop binge eating or give up alcohol (I chose these as examples as are they are so common) and you want to binge eat or drink, then stop and think about these five things. Then write down the following in your journal:

  • What triggered you to want to binge eat or drink
  • What images you see in your head when you are triggered
  • What happened to lead you to the point that you want to binge eat or drink
  • What emotions do you feel from being triggered
  • What sensations your body is experiencing

I also recommend keeping a running list of all the wonderful things you experience both physically and emotionally when you aren’t engaging in that unhealthy habit. For example, if you are trying to quit drinking, then positive results would be weight loss, a more restful night’s sleep, increased productivity, etc. Then think about these positive benefits (rather than the negative results of the unhealthy habit) and all that you gain from quitting whenever you are triggered to engage in that unhealthy habit.

More Ways to Practice Self Care

Looking for more ways to practice self care in your day-to-day life? Try one of these other self care ideas and projects.

free printable self care journal pages ideas prompts

If you love my free printable self care journal, then be sure to pin it to Pinterest for later.

For more great self care ideas as well as DIY bath and beauty recipes, be sure to follow Soap Deli News. You can follow me now on facebooktwitterpinterest and instagram. Or find me on Blog Lovin’. To receive an email whenever I share a new post, sign up via feedburner here.