Natural Black Clay and Sea Salt Soap Recipe

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This natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe is made using Australian black clay and fine sea salt for a luxurious spa like experience in the shower!

This natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe is made using Australian black clay and fine sea salt for a luxurious spa like experience in the shower!

Australian Midnight Black Clay contains a variety of natural minerals including iron, potassium, calcium, magnesium and copper and is suitable for most every skin type. It aids in removing toxins and impurities from skin in a similar way as activated charcoal while also adding conditioning properties. Sea salt, like black clay, also helps to detoxify skin and provides trace minerals. Create this natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe to use daily as a facial or body soap or whenever you want to enjoy a spa like experience at home.

The lovely bluish-gray color of this sea salt soap recipe is derived solely from the black clay. Coarse sea salt is then added to the top of this homemade soap for visual interest and contrast.

This natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe is made using Australian black clay and fine sea salt for a luxurious spa like experience in the shower!

Natural Black Clay & Sea Salt Soap Recipe

© Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen

Ingredients:

18 oz. sustainable palm oil
7.2 oz. refined (76° melt point) coconut oil
1.8 oz. castor oil
7.2 oz. pomace olive oil
1.8 oz. apricot kernel oil

11.8 oz. distilled water
4.7 oz. lye/sodium hydroxide

1 teaspoon Australian Midnight Black Clay
4 Tablespoons fine sea salt
1.7 oz. Cedarwood Sage EO & FO blend, optional (or scent of choice)
coarse sea salt, optional to suit

Soap Notes:

Water as % of oils=33%
10% superfat

This natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe will yield 10-12 bars of soap approximately 4 oz. each depending on how they are cut and fits inside my DIY wooden loaf soap mold.

Instructions:

To make this natural Australian midnight black clay and sea salt soap recipe, you’ll need to follow your basic cold process soapmaking method instructions. (If you’ve never made cold process soap before here’s a good, inexpensive beginner’s cold process soap recipe.) Be sure to take all proper safety precautions when working with lye including goggles and gloves.

Begin by measuring out the distilled water in fluid ounces. Pour into a heat safe pitcher. Next, using a digital scale weigh out the lye. Slowly pour the lye into the water in a well ventilated area and stir until all the lye has dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Now weigh out the palm, coconut, castor, olive and apricot kernel oils using a digital scale and combine in a stainless steel pot. Heat until melted, then remove from heat and set aside. Then weigh out the fragrance, if desired, and set aside. You can also measure out the fine sea salt and black clay using measuring spoons so they are also ready when you start making this sea salt soap recipe.

When the lye-water and soapmaking oils have cooled to around 90°-95°F you’re ready to make soap.

Begin by adding the Austalian Midnight Black Clay to the melted soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until evenly distributed throughout the oils.

Now slowly pour the lye-water into the soapmaking oils. Mix with a stick blender until you reach a light trace, then add the fragrance and the salt. Mix well to combine thoroughly to medium trace, then pour the soap into your prepared mold.

This natural black clay and sea salt soap recipe is made using Australian black clay and fine sea salt for a luxurious spa like experience in the shower!

If desired add coarse sea salt to the top of the soap loaf at this time. As this soap does get rather hot during saponification, I recommend NOT covering and insulating it as it could cause the top to crack. Set aside for 24 hours.

After 24 hours your can unmold your homemade soap loaf and cut it into bars. (These sea salt soap bars harden rather quickly so it’s best to cut them as soon as possible.) Allow your soaps to cure 4-6 weeks before use, then wrap and label as desired.

For more of my homemade soap recipes as well as bath and beauty DIY’s be sure to visit Rebecca’s Soap Delicatessen. You can also follow me on Pinterest for collections of not only my homemade soap recipes and beauty DIY’s but also some of my favorites from around the web.

Keep track of all my new homemade soap recipes and other DIY creations by following Soap Deli News blog via Blog Lovin’ and Tumblr. You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, G+ and Instagram.


Blog posts may contain affiliate links for which I receive a small commission when you make a purchase. Full disclosure can be found here.


Comments

  1. Is there a particular ingredient that causes this soap recipe to get so hot during saponification? Thanks!